Emma Griffin

WeAreTechWomen Conference Speaker Spotlight: Emma Griffin, Sky

Emma Griffin

WeAreTechWomen speaks to Emma Griffin, Director, Group Deputy Chief Information Security Officer, Sky, about her career.

Emma is also one of our speakers at our upcoming WeAreTechWomen: The Future World of Work conference on 22 November. Emma is holding a session on her journey from ambulance dispatcher to security chief.

Emma is Group Deputy Chief Information Security Officer at Sky with responsibilities across all aspects of cyber security, including information security strategy, governance, risk and compliance.

With over 20 years of experience in security and technology infrastructure, Emma has worked across a variety of sectors including financial services, insurance and management consultancies. Prior to Sky, Emma has held numerous roles at Worldpay and Goldman Sachs leading and managing global cyber programmes.

Emma has a Master’s degree in Information Security from Royal Holloway.

WeAreTechWomen, the Technology arm of WeAreTheCity, is hosting its fourth full-day conference in London, aimed at over 400 women who are wanting to broaden their technology horizons, learn new skills and build their tech networks.

Our unique conference will include the opportunity for our delegates to learn about a variety of technical topics and get involved in Q&A’s, hands-on activities and interactive workshops. Our aim is to provide an environment where our delegates can upskill and grow their skills/networks for the future.

Can you tell us a little about your background? Where you’ve come from, where you’ve worked, how you got to where you are today?

I started my working life working for the London Ambulance Service. Covering North West London, including Heathrow airport and Wembley Stadium, I was responsible for managing normal 999 calls alongside hotels on fire, train accidents, emergencies with large crowds and aeroplanes landing with mechanical problems. It was both exciting and stressful and taught me the fundamentals of incident management that I still use today. I then embarked on a career in technology, spending most of my time in the financial sector and now work at Sky as their Deputy Group CISO responsible for everything cyber security.

Did you ever sit down and plan your career?

For many years I just bumbled along, working hard and hoping I would be rewarded and something good would come along. But I then realised I needed to own and drive my career and so literally sat down worked out what I wanted to do, formalised a plan and even wrote a script of how to have ‘the conversation’ with my manager.

What inspired you to get involved with in motivational speaking?

The important changes in my life and career have been helped by guidance and support from mentors and role models, I realise that not everybody has them, do think it is important to encourage and inspire the person next to you.

Do you have a favourite experience from your career?

The feeling of empowerment when I convinced my boss to help me change role when no role existed. I was terrified I would be out of a job, but so proud of my bravery and wish I had done it years before.

What do you think WeAreTechWomen guests will gain from your talk?

Hopefully they will feel inspired to take charge of their career, form a plan and act on it.

What are your top three tips for success?

  • Never stop learning / studying – life is changing around you all the time.
  • Take ownership of your career and drive it – don’t expect someone else to do it.
  • Build a great team – success is not a solo achievement, you need good company.

What has been your biggest challenge during your career?

I wanted to change role, but didn’t know what I wanted to do next, just that I wanted something different. Building up the courage to take a leap of faith, and just try something new, that may not be successful.

What piece of advice would you give to your younger self?

Don’t be shy - Learn to promote your skills and successes, it’s not boasting.


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Ada Lovelace featured

Inspirational quotes: Ada Lovelace | The first computer programmer

Ada Lovelace

Ada Lovelace was a mathematician and writer, known for her work on Charles Babbage's proposed mechanical general-purpose computer, the Analytical Engine.

Lovelace was the first to recognise that the machine had applications beyond pure calculation and published the first algorithm intended to be carried out by such a machine.

As a result, Lovelace is regarded as one of the first computer programmers.

Today, marks Ada Lovelace Day - an annual event celebrated on the second Tuesday of October. The day began in 2009 with the aim of raising the profile of women in STEM (science, technology, engineering and maths), and to create new role models for girls and women.

In honour of Ada Lovelace Day, WeAreTechWomen take a look at Lovelace's most inspiring quotes!


"That brain of mine is something more than merely mortal; as time will show."

"If you can't give me poetry, can't you give me poetical science?"

"I never am really satisfied that I understand anything; because, understand it well as I may, my comprehension can only be an infinitesimal fraction of all I want to understand about the many connections and relations which occur to me, how the matter in question was first thought of or arrived at..."

"Religion to me is science and science is religion."

"The more I study, the more insatiable do I feel my genius for it to be."

"Your best and wisest refuge from all troubles is in your science."

"The science of operations, as derived from mathematics more especially, is a science of itself, and has its own abstract truth and value."

"Imagination is the Discovering Faculty, pre-eminently. It is that which penetrates into the unseen worlds around us, the worlds of Science."

"Mathematical science shows what is. It is the language of unseen relations between things. But to use and apply that language, we must be able to fully to appreciate, to feel, to seize the unseen, the unconscious."

"As soon as I have got flying to perfection, I have got a scheme about a steam engine."


Women who broke the barriers of STEM

Eight forgotten women in history who broke the barriers of STEM

 

Women have had a long and illustrious history in science, technology, engineering and mathematical fields.

From the invention of Kevlar to the blueprint for the inaugural computer programme, female pioneers have been behind some of the greatest STEM discoveries.

Currys PC World and Microsoft Surface's campaign looks at eight superheroines who fought for their work, their ideas, and often overcame the odds in the process. Each of the women has an incredible story worth discovering, and a legacy that has left a lasting impact on the world.

Ada Lovelace

Lovelace is recognised as the world’s first computer programmer.

While poring over the designs for Charles Babbage’s mechanical computer, dubbed The Analytical Engine, Lovelace reached a remarkable conclusion.

If the machine could manipulate numbers to solve equations, it could also manipulate symbols, and thus could be instructed to do almost anything.

While Babbage focused on producing flawless mathematical tables, Lovelace saw that the Analytical Engine could be programmed to create music or graphics.

To demonstrate the power of the Analytical Engine, she wrote a detailed description of how it could calculate an important series of numbers called Bernoulli Numbers.

This invention is seen today as the world’s first computer program.

Hedy Lamarr

Considered by many the Angelina Jolie of 1940s cinema, Lamarr was disillusioned with the idea of starring in films while the Second World War raged.

She and her neighbour, the composer George Antheil, filed a patent for a “frequency-hopping” system that would allow Allied torpedoes to travel unseen under the water without being intercepted by German intelligence.

Though the patent was granted in 1942, the idea was never used during the war. It was, however, picked up by the Navy in 1957, and today is one of the principles behind Bluetooth, GPS and Wi-Fi.

Rosalind Franklin

For a long time, the history books gave credit to two men for discovering the shape and form of DNA: Francis Crick and James Watson.

But without Rosalind Franklin, they wouldn’t have had all the pieces needed to complete the puzzle.

Franklin captured an X-ray image of DNA, proving a long-held scientific belief that DNA was likely composed of two opposing coiled chains: a double helix, in other words.

As fate would have it, Crick and Watson were given access to Franklin’s work. The photo, along with their existing research, gave them free rein to take credit for the structure of deoxyribose nucleic acid, their findings published in Nature magazine in 1953.

A small footnote in Nature acknowledged Franklin for having “stimulated” aspects of the discovery, but Franklin died an unknown commodity outside the scientific community.

Virginia Apgar

Apgar specialised in anaesthetics, with a focus on analysing the effects of these drugs on newborn babies and mothers.

Her proximity to the postnatal wards meant she was able to make a troubling observation: babies who were born blue in the face or struggling to breathe were being written-off as stillborn. Apgar reasoned that, in many of the cases, if treatment was delivered swiftly, the baby could be saved.

She devised the “Apgar Score” in response. When a child is delivered, they would be judged on their heart rate, breath, muscle tone, reflexes and skin colour. Each category carried a score of either 0, 1, or 2. Once these scores were totted up, children in danger could be easily identified and sent off for immediate treatment.

The “Apgar Score” gave nurses the teeth to act swiftly and gave babies a fighting chance. In part because of Apgar’s simple system, deaths of newborn babies dropped from one in 30 in 1950 to one in 500 in America today.

Katsuko Saruhashi

Katsuko Saruhashi came to prominence in the 1950s when she concluded that carbon dioxide (CO2) – produced by humans and big industry - was killing marine life. She brought this fact to the world’s attention, then armed scientists with a system for measuring it – the Saruhashi Table is still used today.

In the 1960s, she turned her attention to nuclear waste. The United States had been testing nuclear weapons on islands 4,500 kilometres from Japan. Saruhashi discovered that in the space of 18 months, radioactive water had turned up on Japanese shores. Her research helped tighten ocean laws governing nuclear experimentation.

Maria Van Brittan Brown

Marie Van Brittan Brown worked odd hours as a nurse and was often home alone in Queens, New York in the 1960s. Fearing for her safety, she decided to take matters into her own hands by inventing the world’s first home security system.

Working with her husband Albert, Marie drilled four discreet peep holes through her door, then installed a camera attached to a motor that could move between the four holes at the behest of the homeowner. This was rigged up to a monitor in Marie’s bedroom, and a microphone was installed so that Marie could address door-knockers without having to get out of bed. If the intruder was welcome, a button could be pushed that opened the door remotely. If not, a separate button pinged the emergency services.

The husband and wife duo filed a patent in 1966 and this early blueprint is still inspiring inventors today.

Stephanie Kwolek

Of all the inventors on this list, perhaps no one has saved as many lives as Stephanie Kwolek.

Why? Well, Kwolek discovered Kevlar in 1965.

At the time, she was a DuPont employee working to find a lightweight material that could reinforce car tires. She spent her time experimenting with liquid solutions that she melted at temperatures reaching 200°C and “spun” into thin, fibrous strands – a process broadly similar to making cotton candy. Kwolek discovered that, by lowering the temperature, she was able to spin something incredibly strong, stiff and light: Kevlar.

It’s a buttermilk-coloured yarn that’s five times stronger than steel and has reinforced police jackets since entering mass production in 1971.

Emilie Du Châtelet

Emilie Du Châtelet had complementary gifts: an ability to comprehend complex science, and an ability to describe that science to the masses.

She is famous for translating the works of Newton, whose science was new, ground-breaking and almost entirely alien to the French people of the time.

At 42, du Châtelet fell pregnant in an era when childbirth was incredibly dangerous and at an age where her odds of survival were slim to none. She worked long days and nights to complete her magnum opus before she died: a complete translation of Newton’s Principia, adding in extensive notes and a summary section where she cleaned up Newton’s obtuse prose and gave clear, digestible, bite-sized bits of information. She managed to complete the work before her untimely death, and today, du Châtelet’s translation remains the definitive French-language version.

Discover more about the STEM Superheroines campaign here.


gender-equality-featured

Shining a light on the equality problem in STEM this Ada Lovelace Day

gender equality

By Industry Experts

Not only are education institutions seeing a continued low proportion of women opting for STEM subjects and ultimately taking up roles in these fields, but a recent report has revealed more than half of women in the tech industry leave by a mid-point in their career.

This is double the rate of men and due in part to weak management, a lack of perceived opportunities, and a poor work-life balance.

Ada Lovelace Day presents the perfect opportunity to reflect on the personal experiences of women in tech and hear what they think companies must do to encourage greater equality in the workplace.

Natacha Robert, Divisional Finance Director, Civica, explains that studying STEM gives you the best foundation for your future career. “In my current job as Divisional Finance Director, my STEM background and knowledge has no doubt informed many of my leadership decisions, resulting in more scientifically grounded and logical decision-making. I found that having a STEM background has given me a better understanding of my peers’ specialities, related to software development and system architecture. I firmly believe that studying STEM subjects equips you with problem-solving skills and teaches you how to apply knowledge and skills to real-world professional challenges, giving you the ability to maximise results.”

But according to Lindsey Kneuven, Chief Impact Officer at Pluralsight and Executive Director of Pluralsight One, there is still a long way to go. “Despite the increased awareness around STEM’s gender imbalance, the problem is systemic. According to a recent UNESCO report, women represent just 35 per cent of STEM students globally. We must accelerate the pace of change to achieve gender equity and ensure the voices, expertise, power and perspectives of women are included to help shape the future.”

Esther Mahr, Conversational Experience Designer, IPsoft, echoes this. “When I look around at industry gatherings, among a sea of engineers, developers, program managers, business analysts and service delivery heads, I still see too few female faces. And it’s not just a lack of female representation – we are a rather homogeneous industry.

“While one day is a good start to creating awareness, more needs to be done to encourage girls to take up STEM subjects. As technology – and in particular AI – becomes an integral part of our world, we have to equip younger generations with the necessary skills they will need to be successful in their future working lives.”

Barbara Schretter, Team Lead Data Science, Celonis, agrees that, it’s important to encourage more women of all ages, backgrounds and experience levels to explore working in technology. “Hopefully by making them more visible, the next generation of female technology professionals can find role models and become inspired to pursue a career in technology.

“It’s a good idea to involve companies in such projects as there will be more and more people needed in tech in the future,” explains Schretter. “The sooner young people start with coding, the better it will be for their future careers. Even if they don’t programme on their own, to have a basic understanding of coding can’t do any harm. Having companies involved in such projects might also help them get excited about building their own scripts or solving various problems through scripting.”

But, while the number of girls studying STEM subjects has risen, “we need to ensure we continue to highlight more role models and the opportunities technology presents for girls’ and young women’s future careers,” explains Jayne Stone, Chief Marketing Officer, Vuealta

“As business leaders, we need to make an active effort to work in collaboration with schools, colleges, parents and media, to ensure girls can learn about these role models and feel confident and equipped to study STEM subjects and hopefully, a career in STEM. We also need to broaden our role models to make it clear that a career in technology doesn’t mean you’ll be confined to one discipline, and it doesn’t necessarily require qualifications in STEM fields.

“From example, Vuealta enables its customers to transform their business planning and supply chain operations through the use of technology, but you don’t have to necessarily be an expert in IT to work within this industry.”

As explained by Joanne Warner, Head of Customer Service, Natterbox though, there is still a cultural change needed within the workplace as well. “It was only after I had my second child that I felt that my gender was at the heart of an issue at work. Some of my management and colleagues thought that my commitment and motivations within the workplace had changed. But this only made me even more determined to prove that work ethic is not defined by gender or children. Everyone will always come across workplace challenges, but I enjoy sometimes having to prove myself – it’s what keeps us engaged with our work and motivated to push forward.

Warner believes “we need diversity to thrive and evolve, so it’s vital that businesses and education organisations continue to promote all opportunities as equal. Spending time and investment in understanding people’s motivations and strengths can produce the most innovative and loyal employees or students.”

Lori MacVittie, Principal Threat Evangelist, F5 Networks thinks “there is a tendency to dismiss women in technology that aren’t in a hands-on role, but we need to support and promote all women in the technology industry because ultimately not everyone that wants a slice of the tech world wants to sit and code all day.

“Fundamentally, STEM has a brand problem and there is a stereotype of the type of women who work in STEM roles. We might think of introverts and people that wear all black and no heels, but that’s just not the case! Whatever kind of woman you are, what you wear or what personality you have, is irrelevant. There’s a role for you.”

Kneuven concludes, “now is the time for companies to prove they are not merely interested in rhetoric but are committed to achieving lasting change in the STEM industry within our lifetime. We must eliminate the barriers that prevent girls’ participation, radically disrupt our education systems and hiring practices to ensure true inclusion and inspire the next generation of talent to pursue their own promising STEM careers. It’s time for all leaders to evaluate how they can make a difference and move the industry forward with equal representation.”


Sky-logo-featured

Sky Returners Progamme | Leeds

SKy-Logo-e1546951493720

We’re Sky, Europe’s biggest entertainment brand.

Think top-quality shows. Breaking news. Innovative tech. Must-have products. Careers here mean the freedom and support you need to make an impact – pushing boundaries, creating solutions, hitting targets. And as part of our close-knit team, you’ll enjoy plenty of benefits. Plus, experiences you’ll only find at Sky.

This is the first time we are running a Technology Returners Programme at Sky Leeds Dock. The programme is designed to support anyone who has previously worked as a Software Developer but have taken a career break (for any reason), and is wanting to get back into the industry. The programme will be paid from the start and is a permanent position. We will give the training and support you need to get your skills up to date and give you the confidence to get back to work.

The perks

Sky Q, a generous pension and private health care. Access to over 12,000 LinkedIn Learning courses to support your development. And if that’s not enough, our Leeds Dock campus offers a pool table, table tennis, discounted gym membership, endless local discounts, and much more. We are also happy to discuss flexible working.

To find out more about working with us, search #LifeatSky on LinkedIn, Twitter or Instagram.

You will:

  • Attend a 4-week paid bootcamp on campus at Sky to upskill and train in TDD, BDD, Java, writing clean code, ReactJS to help build upon your skills and build your confidence.
  • Work on a project alongside other technical returner.
  • After 2 months of training you will move into delivery teams at Sky Leeds dock and take on a technical role on projects to deliver unified solutions.
  • Be involved as necessary with the planning, design, development, enhancement and implementation of solutions.
  • Develop and maintain Sky’s website and apps which are used by millions of customers daily.
  • Used TDD to deliver enterprise-quality code.
  • Work in an agile team and contribute to agile practices.
  • Receive ongoing support to ensure you feel integrated back into the workplace after your career break.

You’ll have:

  • Software development experience in industry at a mid level.
  • Excellent problem-solving abilities; able to learn and apply new technical knowledge quickly.
  • Excellent communication skills, and able to relate to all levels of the company.
  • Understanding of sound software lifecycle methodologies and/or agile delivery.
  • Ability to work under pressure in a fast-paced and progressive environment.
  • Have a passion for software excellence, delivering code of the highest quality, and a willingness to learn new languages and practices.

So, what are you waiting for? Apply now for a chance to forge your own career path and be brilliant as part of a bright, talented team.

Just so you know: if your application is successful, we’ll ask you to complete a criminal record check. And depending on the role you have applied for and the nature of any convictions, we might withdraw the offer.

We’re happy to discuss flexible working.

It’s our people that make Sky Europe’s leading entertainment company. That’s why we work hard to be an inclusive employer, so everyone at Sky can be their best.

A job you love to talk about.

FIND OUT MORE & APPLY


'Amazon Future Engineer' launches to help children from low-income backgrounds build careers in Computer Science

amazon-logo

'Amazon Future Engineer' launches in the UK to help children and young adults from low-income backgrounds build careers in Computer Science.

The UK needs an additional 38,000 workers with computer science-related skills, including 21,000 computer science graduates, to meet labour demands every year – or the economy could lose out on an estimated £33 billion a year by 2030, according to new research by Capital Economics.

To help close that gap, Amazon is launching Amazon Future Engineer in the UK – a comprehensive childhood-to-career programme to inspire, educate, and enable children and young adults to try computer science. By supporting the recruitment and training of 50 secondary school computer science teachers and over 200 ‘Careers Leaders’, launching robotics workshops for 10,000 children and creating other opportunities to experience computer science, Amazon Future Engineer is set to reach more than one million children and young people across the UK over the next two years.

Through Amazon Future Engineer, ten thousand primary school pupils will have the opportunity to take part in free robotics workshops at Amazon fulfilment centres across the UK over the next two years, learning to program robots which use similar technology to what is used by Amazon to fulfil customer orders. The workshops, created alongside Fire Tech, are designed to give children first-hand experience of how technology works in the real world and have been accredited by the British Science Association. Amazon will also embark on a road trip across the UK, bringing the robotics workshops to primary schools around the country.

Additionally, Amazon has helped create an interactive dance-themed online coding tutorial together with non-profit organisation Code.org, featuring songs from leading artists, with the aim of reaching a million children in the UK. Globally, tens of millions of children and young people have already participated in Hour of Code tutorials since 2013. One hour of learning through Hour of Code is proven to have a positive impact on students, with a significant increase in the number of students saying they like computer science and perform better in computer science tasks.

Speaking about the programme, Doug Gurr, UK Country Manager, Amazon, said, "Research shows the UK needs 21,000 more computer science graduates on average, every year, to meet the demands of the digital economy."

"By making computer science skills more widely accessible from childhood to career, we hope Amazon Future Engineer will inspire and empower young people, regardless of their background, to take up careers in computer science.”

RT Hon Gavin Williamson CBE MP, Secretary of State for Education added, "Today’s school pupils will go on to do jobs that don’t even exist yet because the world of technology and computing is progressing so quickly."

"This is why we’re making sure our schools and teachers equip young people with the skills and knowledge they’ll need to be successful in the future by expanding our IoT programme and investing an extra £14bn in schools over the next three years."

"The work of Amazon Future Engineer will support us in just that by harnessing  Amazon’s reach and know-how to make sure that pupils from all backgrounds can access a cutting edge education and I look forward to seeing it in action.”

Amazon Future Engineer is part of the Amazon in the Community programme, which aims to ensure more children and young adults have the resources and skills they need to build their best and brightest futures, especially those from low-income communities in the areas where Amazon has a physical presence.

You can find out about Amazon Future Engineer at http://www.amazonfutureengineer.co.uk, and more about the Amazon in the Community programme at https://www.aboutamazon.co.uk/amazon-in-the-community.


TechWomen100 2019 featured

Nominations are now closed for WeAreTechWomen's 2019 TechWomen100 Awards

TechWomen100 2019

Nominations are now closed for WeAreTechWomen's 2019 TechWomen100 Awards.

A shortlist of 200 women will now be chosen by an esteemed panel of judges and will be published in November.

The shortlist will then be open to a public vote. Judging for the final 100 winners will take place with independent judges across November. The TechWomen100 Award winners will be announced on 10 December and all winners, sponsors and supporters will be invited to attend a prestigious evening reception to celebrate and collect their awards in January 2020.

For the TechWomen100 awards, we are leveraging the extensive experience and industry knowledge of 17 amazing judges. Each judge has been carefully selected for their expertise in a particular field or their breadth of knowledge across the tech landscape.

On behalf of WeAreTechWomen, our sponsors and nominees, we would like to sincerely thank all of our judges for their dedication to the female pipeline and for donating their valuable time to judge the TechWomen100 awards in 2019.

Meet our judges here

The TechWomen100 awards are the first of their kind to focus solely on the female tech talent pipeline and recognise the impact of champions, companies and networks that are leading the way.

The 2019 awards are kindly powered by J.P. Morgan, and supported by Accenture, BAE Systems, Barclays, Credit Suisse, Lloyds Banking Group, Oliver Wyman and Worldpay.

Remaining timeline

  • Shortlist announced & public vote opens* – 18 November 2019
  • Voting closes – 29 November 2019
  • Winners announced – 10 December 2019
  • Winner’s celebration event – 23 January 2020

*There is no public vote of support for the Champion, Network and Company categories

If you have any additional questions about the awards, please contact info@wearethecity.com. For further details about the awards, please click here.


Sponsored by

TechWomen100 Awards sponsor bubble


TechWomen100 2019 featured

Just one week left to nominate for our 2019 TechWomen100 Awards

TechWomen100 2019

Just one week left to nominate someone for our 2019 TechWomen100 Awards.

It is no secret that the technology industry lacks female representation at all levels. Women make up just 19 per cent of the industry. There are some fantastic awards for women working in tech, however, most of these focus on senior women.

Whilst we feel it is extremely necessary to highlight senior and influential women, we also believe the pipeline of female technologists need a platform to shine.

This is why the TechWomen100 Awards were created. Our awards focus solely on women working in tech below director level. We hope that by highlighting the accolades of up-and-coming inspirational female tech talent, we can help to create a new generation of female role models for the industry, and a pipeline of future leaders.

Through the awards, we would also like to recognise a number of senior individuals who are championing up-and-coming women, as well as any organisations that have designed and implemented successful initiatives and programmes in order to attract, retain and develop the female tech talent.

Finally, we applaud the often-voluntary efforts of the women in tech networks that operate across the UK, and again would like to formerly recognise these within our awards.

The TechWomen100 awards are the first of their kind to focus solely on the female tech talent pipeline and recognise the impact of champions, companies and networks that are leading the way.

The 2019 awards are kindly powered by J.P. Morgan, and supported by Accenture, BAE Systems, Barclays, Credit Suisse, Lloyds Banking Group, Oliver Wyman and Worldpay.

NOMINATE NOW

Nominations

Nominations will close after a seven-week period on 20 September.

A shortlist of 200 women from a range of technology disciplines will be chosen in October by an esteemed panel of judges. There will also be a shortlist of three champions, companies and networks.

The shortlist will then be published in November where we will also open the TechWomen100 individual category for public votes of support.

All winners will be announced in December and celebrated at our prestigious award's ceremony in January. There will be 100 winners of the TechWomen100, a Champion of the Year, a Company of the Year and a Network of the Year.

Who should nominate?

  • Self-nominations are encouraged
  • Organisations looking to recognise their emerging talent pool
  • Organisation wishing to obtain recognition for their initiatives
  • Individuals who would like to recognise their efforts of their champions/role models
  • Individuals/colleagues/friends/clients/mentors/sponsors of the nominee

Awards timeline

  • Nominations open – 01 August 2019
  • Nominations close – 20 September 2019
  • Shortlist announced & public vote opens – 18 November 2019
  • Voting closes – 29 November 2019
  • Winners announced – 10 December 2019
  • Winner's celebration event – January 2020

NOMINATE NOW


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women in computing, teacher, STEM featured

Proportion of women studying Computing rises to 13.3 per cent

women in computing, teacher, STEM

The proportion of women studying Computing A-Levels has risen to 13.3 per cent, according the new research.

The study, conducted by Ensono, found that although the number of women taking Computing has doubled since 2013, it remains unequal. In 2019, 9,649 males took Computing A-Levels, while only 1,475 females did.

The research also found that there has been a five-year increase in students taking STEM subjects. STEM subjects include Biology, Chemistry, Computing, Further Maths, Maths and Physics.

Further to this, there has been a five-year decrease in arts subjects of 20 per cent. Art subjects include English, Drama, Art & Design, Media/Film/TV studies and Religious Studies.

Speaking about the research, Oliver Presland, Vice President of Global Product Management at Ensono said, "More students than ever are achieving STEM A-Levels, with a nine per cent uptick in these subjects over five years."

"Computing has been no exception and it’s especially encouraging to see the proportion of women taking the subject has doubled since 2013."

"However, it’s worth pointing out that in Computing, the gender balance is still highly skewed towards men, with 9,649 and 1,475 entries for males and females respectively."

"More will still need to be done in this regard to encourage women into the space."

"With the UK in the midst of a digital skills gap, increased uptake of Computing A-level represents positive news for the industry."

"Lack of appropriate skills currently presents a major hurdle to business growth and innovation, and has hindered the UK’s competitiveness."

"As the Fourth Industrial Revolution ushers in far-reaching economic and societal changes, the world of work is evolving with new roles demanding new, digital capabilities."

"Youngsters need to be able to flourish in this dramatically different environment, and students today seem to be acknowledging those changes in the subjects they’re choosing.”