Sue Black OBE in conversation with Vanessa Vallely OBE - She Talks Tech podcast

Listen to our latest She Talks Tech podcast - Sue Black OBE in conversation with Vanessa Vallely OBE

Sue Black OBE in conversation with Vanessa Vallely OBE - She Talks Tech podcast

Today we hear from award-winning Computer Scientist and Digital Skills Expert, Sue Black OBE.

Sue set up the UK’s first online network for women in tech and led the campaign to save Bletchley Park. She left home at 16, married at 20 and had three children by 23 – becoming a single parent at 25. We hear about Sue’s background and career in tech and her most recent passion ‘TechUPWomen’ – which is all about retraining women from underserved backgrounds into tech careers.

You can find out more about and connect with Sue on LinkedIn.

LISTEN HERE


‘She Talks Tech’ brings you stories, lessons and tips from some of the most inspirational women (and men!) in tech.

From robotics and drones, to fintech, neurodiversity and coronavirus apps; these incredible speakers are opening up to give us the latest information on tech in 2020.

Vanessa Valleley OBE, founder of WeAreTheCity and WeAreTechWomen brings you this latest resource to help you rise to the top of the tech industry. Women in tech make up just 17 per cent of the industry in the UK and we want to inspire that to change.

WeAreTechWomen are delighted to bring this very inspiring first series to wherever you normally listen to podcasts – and the first three episodes are now live!

So subscribe, rate the podcast and give it a 5-star review – and keep listening every Wednesday morning for a new episode of ‘She Talks Tech’.

Produced by Pineapple Audio Production.


Win a complimentary place to WIRED Live

WIRED Live

WeAreTechWomen has teamed up with WIRED to give you a chance to win a complimentary place to WIRED Live on 24th November 2020.

WIRED Live celebrates the inspirational and compelling stories on ideas, business, technology and design found within WIRED UK's magazine.

WIRED Live – Europe’s premium conference dedicated to exploring the future of the world – returns this November as a virtual broadcast. Hear top-level talks from a curated smorgasbord of scientists, artists, innovators, disruptors and influencers.

As we settle into a post-COVID world, WIRED Live will retain the rare combination of WIRED’s journalistic eye, diverse programme, and connections with innovators, designers, strategists and entrepreneurs whilst designed to allow attendees to view at home or in the office (or, where ever they are in the world!).

Attendees have said that WIRED Live is like “coming up for a breath of fresh air” – and we hope to see you again this year.

This year's speakers include:

  • Demis Hassabis, Co-founder & CEO, Deepmind
  • Es Devlin, Artist and Designer
  • Brian May CBE, Musician, Astrophysicist, Founding Member of Queen
  • Chi Onwurah, Shadow Minister Digital, Science & Technology, Labour MP for Newcastle upon Tyne Central
  • Pragya Agarwal, Behavioural Scientist, Author, SWAY: Unravelling Unconscious Bias
  • Herman Narula, CEO and Co-Founder, Improbable
  • Lynne Owens, Director General, NCA
  • Clara Sousa-Silva, Molecular Astrophysicist, Research Scientist, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
  • Joe Wicks, The Body Coach
  • Jessica Wade, Physicist, Department of Physics and Centre for Plastic Electronics, Blackett Laboratory
  • Benedict Evans, Independent analyst
  • Maria Konnikova, Author of The Biggest Bluff: How I Learned to Pay Attention, Master Myself, and Win
  • Bjarke Ingels, Founder and Creative Director, BIG-Bjarke Ingels Group
  • Vanessa Nakate, Ugandan climate activist
  • Joshua Wong, Hong Kong Political Activist

WeAreTechWomen are delighted to confirm we have four complimentary places to offer to our members – tickets will be allocated on a first come, first serve basis.

REGISTER HERE


workplace bullying

Tech sector needs to take problematic behaviour in the workplace more seriously

workplace bullying

One-quarter of the UK’s tech workforce have experienced unacceptable behaviour in the workplace, according to a new report.

The report from Culture Shift also found that 39 per cent feel anxious about seeing somebody they have a negative relationship with when they go back to the office.

The tech-for-good developer has released the insights in line with this year’s Anti-Bullying Week, which falls between the 16th-20th November, to encourage companies across the UK to take a preventative approach to tackling problematic behaviour in the workplace.

The same report also revealed that while 88 per cent of employees across the UK’s tech sector say knowing their employer takes bullying and harassment complaints seriously is an important factor to their overall happiness at work, 15 per cent have witnessed unacceptable behaviour in their workplace. Furthermore, 43 per cent feel more likely to experience something they would describe as bullying or harassment in the workplace, compared to 30 per cent who feel more likely to bear the brunt of such behaviour while working from home.

Speaking about the report, Gemma McCall, CEO, Culture Shift, said, "It’s clear that bullying and harassment is prevalent in many workplaces and employers need to do more to tackle the problem."

"Many employees are calling for their employers to put a platform in place in which individuals can provide anonymous feedback or report any instances of bullying and harassment, and this kind of insight must be acted on by employers if they want to attract and retain talent."

“If incidents of problematic behaviour are left unchecked in a workplace, it can lead to significant cultural issues that will get worse over time."

"It can lead to people feeling unhappy which in turn can create high rates of absence or presenteeism, low productivity and high turnover of staff.”

“By providing clear and safe reporting pathways, organisations can encourage a speak up culture."

"Employers should not only signpost to these platforms, but actively encourage employees to use them, with those that do speak out against bullying encouraged and supported for doing so, rather than perpetuating any stigma."

“Taking a proactive and preventative approach to tackling negative and harmful behaviours, will in turn help protect company culture and employee wellbeing.”


WeAreTechWomen covers the latest female centric news stories from around the world, focusing on women in technology, careers and current affairs. You can find all the latest gender news here.

Don’t forget, you can also follow us via our social media channels for the latest up-to-date gender news. Click to follow us on Twitter, Facebook and YouTube.


June Angelides

June Angelides MBE | VC at Samos Investments, Entrepreneur, Advisor, Speaker, Writer

June Angelides

Named the 6th Most Influential BAME tech leader by the FT in 2018 and 15th Most Influential Woman in Tech by Computer Weekly in 2018, June Angelides MBE is an early stage investor at Samos Investments.

Prior to joining the world of venture capital, she founded a social enterprise, Mums in Technology, which was the first child-friendly coding school in the UK. She previously held roles on the Venture Capital and Early stage banking team at Silicon Valley Bank. She is a strong advocate for the rights of working mothers and is passionate about getting people from all backgrounds into careers in tech and helping more underrepresented founders gain access to funding. She is also a mum of three young children. She actively mentors founders and is on the Board Advisor of Cajigo App, which connects young girls to mentors. In her spare time she can be found on commercial and film sets with her children.


'Rose Review: What's stopping female entrepreneurs?' with Wincie Wong - She Talks Tech podcast

Listen to our latest She Talks Tech podcast episode on 'Rose Review: What's stopping female entrepreneurs?' with Wincie Wong

'Rose Review: What's stopping female entrepreneurs?' with Wincie Wong - She Talks Tech podcast

Today we hear from Wincie Wong, Head of Rose Review Implementation, in her session about the Rose Review and female entrepreneurship. 

The Alison Rose Review for Female Entrepreneurship was commissioned by HM Treasury to look at barriers to female entrepreneurship in the UK. In this session, Wincie will dive into how this review has galvanised the public and private sectors to work together to add another 600,000 female entrepreneurs to the UK by 2030.

You can find out more about and connect with Wincie on Twitter at @WincieWong

LISTEN HERE


‘She Talks Tech’ brings you stories, lessons and tips from some of the most inspirational women (and men!) in tech.

From robotics and drones, to fintech, neurodiversity and coronavirus apps; these incredible speakers are opening up to give us the latest information on tech in 2020.

Vanessa Valleley OBE, founder of WeAreTheCity and WeAreTechWomen brings you this latest resource to help you rise to the top of the tech industry. Women in tech make up just 17 per cent of the industry in the UK and we want to inspire that to change.

WeAreTechWomen are delighted to bring this very inspiring first series to wherever you normally listen to podcasts – and the first three episodes are now live!

So subscribe, rate the podcast and give it a 5-star review – and keep listening every Wednesday morning for a new episode of ‘She Talks Tech’.

Produced by Pineapple Audio Production.


Emily Burridge

Inspirational Woman: Emily Burridge | Concrete Technical Production Manager, Hanson

 

Emily BurridgeEmily Burridge, 22, is a Concrete Technical Production Manager who covers 25 concrete plants in the West Midlands.

Emily is one of only four females to go through the Hanson LEAD programme, which she joined three years ago.

She gained a foundation degree in Minerals Management from the University of Derby and is now focusing on gaining an honours degree, whilst working in her management role at Hanson.

Tell us a bit about yourself, background and your current role

My name is Emily Burridge; I am 22 years old and have been working for Hanson UK for just over three years. I started as a LEAD trainee supervisor on a three-year Higher Apprenticeship in partnership with the University of Derby. I achieved a level 4 SHE qualification and completed a foundation degree in Mineral Extractives Technology. I am now a technical production manager covering 25 concrete plants in the West Midlands, focusing on the quality control of all concrete produced out of the plants and delivered to customers. I also manage four employees who regularly visit construction sites to sample and test the materials produced.

I come from Somerset but moved to South Wales and then the West Midlands for my job. My family are very hands-on in their careers, my father has had roles as a farm labourer and a mechanic, so I was never afraid to get stuck in. Being able to work outside has always appealed to me and mixing office work and site visits is a huge benefit to my role. However, the characters you meet in this industry are the most memorable and fun parts of my job, and stories about massive or unusual building projects are commonplace. Discussing drones, using explosives, or how things have changed over 30 years is incredible; what you can learn talking to others who have been in business for years is astounding.

Did you ever sit down and plan your career?

I was never one for planning the future as I always had the mind-set that everything could change at the last-minute, but the one thing I saw myself going into after college was graphic design having achieved an A* in my A-levels. That never happened. In my last year at college all my friends were visiting universities and applying to UCAS and panicking about the debt they would get into and it changed my perspective. Having already been working for a few years in a pub, I was already adjusting to the world of work and the appeal of getting an education as well as a wage was an eye-opener, so I started looking for apprenticeships on the government website when I spotted the Hanson LEAD programme.

I had no back-up plan and attended the interview and assessment centre where applicants were given a series of challenges to assess team-building, assertiveness, and communication. Luckily I had a phone call the week after and was offered the role.

Have you faced any challenges along the way?

You face challenges in every job, but in the construction industry, ours tend to be on a much larger scale and as a matter of urgency. Typically, you have two hours to place concrete once it is mixed, so there is little time to correct any issues. Imagine you are supplying material to a motorway but the route to the site is blocked. You have to work around that and find a solution or at least ensure the customer is kept informed. The biggest challenge for me has been adjusting my leadership style to ensure I am the best manager I can be for staff who are more experienced than me.

How do you feel about mentoring? Have you mentored anyone or are you someone’s mentee?

While I have no official title as a mentor, I like to think that I make myself approachable and I have good supportive relationships with everyone I communicate with. I see mentoring as crucial as it’s never fun to be thrown in the deep end. Some people can get really weighted down without the right support. In terms of career progression, mentoring people not only gives them higher self-worth but can also prepare them for new roles and changes within the company.

What do you want to see happen within the next five years when it comes to diversity?

Diversity is already increasing within the industry; I would love to see this continue. By no means is the industry discriminatory, but it doesn’t appeal to certain groups of people due to the stereotype of being out on a cliff-face looking at rock. We have space for all types of people within our company and offer positions not just in the building products operational sites but also in the technical areas, HR, Finance, and IT.

If you could change one thing for women in the workplace, what would it be?

Facilities at our operational sites are catching up fast with our larger offices which have excellent amenities and I would like to see that accelerate.

What has been your biggest achievement to date?

My biggest achievement aside from becoming a manager of 25 concrete plants at the age of 21, was a project I headed to create a new concrete mix to be used in ‘Tremie’ applications. It took me a little over a year to research, trial and produce our proprietary product Tremiecrete which is now on the market. I had to send the final report to our parent company, Heidelberg Cement, for approval. It was an intense time, but the reward of seeing a product from an initial idea, to market across the whole of the UK is incredible. I can walk past buildings in the middle of cities and say: my concrete helped that to be possible.

What is your next challenge and what are you hoping to achieve in the future?

My next challenge is in finding a way to challenge the technology of concrete further and create types of mixes that solves existing problems in the construction industry. In my role, product development and an emphasis on material quality is vital. In the future, I hope to help revolutionise the industry through the use of new technologies and initiatives.

Hanson use Early Talent specialists Cohesion to manage their LEAD recruitment process on their behalf. For more information please visit: https://www.hanson-careers.co.uk/en/apprenticeships


Matabe Eyong

Inspirational Woman: Matabe Eyong | Research Chemist, BP

 

Matabe has an impressive academic career – she holds three university degrees, including a Bachelor of Science in Physics, a double major in Chemistry and Biological Science, and a Master’s degree in Physical Chemistry.

Matabe gained experience in various different industries – she worked for cosmetics, food and beverage  and oil and gas companies. Following the birth of her son, she decided to go into research and joined BP.

The main reason for her to pursue a career in science was triggered by the surroundings of her childhood. Growing up in Africa, where science was perceived as a man’s role, and being the only girl of a family with five brothers, she always tried to bridge the gender gap within her family and her surroundings.

Tell us a bit about yourself, background and your current role

My name is Matabe Eyong and I’m a Research Chemist at BP’s Naperville Research Centre. I’m super proud to say I have my dream job. I wake up every day and I am excited to go to work. I joined the company eight years ago and I’m now responsible for designing experiments, operating small pilot plants, training entry level engineers, scientists, and technologists, and ensuring that all our applications on vessels and valves are safe.

I love science. I like the exploratory nature of my job, developing hypotheses and doing experiments. Even if the end result shows you something else than expected, it is always a useful finding.

Outside of work, I love rock-climbing and sky-diving. I go sky-diving every fortnight, and since my son is tall enough, I have started taking him along as well. I also love to cook - I find that recipes are just like chemical formulations.

I’m originally from Cameroon, in West Africa. When I moved to the United States, I enrolled at the Northern Illinois University and graduated with high honours with a double major in Chemistry and Biological Science. I also recently finished a Master’s degree in Physical Chemistry, while I was working at BP.

Did you ever sit down and plan your career?

There has never been a career plan per se. I believe people should pursue a career in a field they are really interested in, stay true to themselves but always look for new opportunities to grow. My motivation to pursue a career in STEM was triggered by my surroundings. Where I grew up in Cameroon, it was a common belief that women are less likely to pursue a career in science or engineering. Growing up among five brothers, who all went into engineering and science, I knew that this was what I wanted to do as well. I just wanted to have the same opportunities in life as the men in my family.

After university, I worked across different industries until I found the sector I really enjoyed working in; I started off at a cosmetics company, then joined a food and beverage company until I decided to try out working in the energy industry. After the birth of my son, I decided to leave the refinery environment behind and joined the research team at BP.

So for me, it was more of ‘trial and error’ until I found my dream job, instead of having a perfectly manufactured career plan.

Have you faced any challenges along the way?

Moving from one position to another is never easy. I would say the biggest challenge was moving to a catalyst discovery lab doing process engineering and analytical chemistry, while managing the equipment. I had to understand the technicalities of engineering and operate small pilot plants. It was a challenging transition for me because I had to learn a lot of new things that engineers do. But every time I went through a challenging time, there was always a positive outcome.

If you could change one thing for women in the workplace, what would it be?

I believe women need to help and uplift each other more. Women can be very critical of each other at times. I do not believe in competing for what I want, I believe in creating what I want. Abraham Lincoln once said: “the best way to predict the future is to create it”. In order for me to be successful I don’t have to take away from anyone. Of course, there are advantages in looking at your peers for inspiration, but being competitive can bring out fears and insecurities that can end up holding you back, so wish other women well and celebrate their successes with them.

How would you encourage more young women and girls into a career in STEM?

I am a STEM ambassador. I want to encourage girls to be curious, persistent, ask a lot of questions and never be afraid to fail. It’s okay to not know the answer right away. I believe there is still a real mystification around STEM jobs – it’s not all hard hats and overalls. We need to be more vocal about our roles and showcase how STEM is all about solving real world problems. I also think that we need to broaden our audience. If we want to attract more girls into science, we should not only focus on this particular audience, but also on educating other key influencers, such as parents and teachers who play a crucial role in a young person’s career choice.

What has been your biggest achievement to date?

I would say that my biggest career highlight was my development over the past couple of years at BP. I moved from a research technologist to a research chemist. I have also had the opportunity to work on high profile projects where I helped to expand production in our refineries and looked at BP’s long-term interest. I have also had the opportunity to work with diverse teams in the UK and China, and got the chance to connect with academics to develop a large number of research and development projects. On a personal level: I’m very proud of having raised my nine year old son on my own.

What is your next challenge and what are you hoping to achieve in the future?

On a professional level, I’m planning to continue developing new skills to become a technical project leader, broadening my scope in terms of research and development. I also want to continue inspiring and guiding more girls into STEM careers in the US, and am planning to go to Cameroon to educate and encourage young girls in both primary and secondary schools on careers in STEM.


She Talks Tech Podcast - Sharmadean Reid in conversation with Vanessa Vallely OBE

Listen to our latest She Talks Tech podcast episode - Sharmadean Reid in conversation with Vanessa Vallely OBE

She Talks Tech Podcast - Sharmadean Reid in conversation with Vanessa Vallely OBE

Today we hear from Sharmadean Reid - the Founder of Beautystack.

Her mission is to use technology to economically empower women. She started WAH as a hip hop magazine for girls in 2006 while still at university. She then founded WAH Nails as a side project in 2009. She then wrote two books, delivered global pop up nail salons for 100s of brands, created a product line with Walgreen Boots Alliance and was awarded an MBE from HRH Queen in 2015 for services to Beauty. Sharmadean and Vanessa discuss the challenges of entrepreneurship and being female founders

You can find out more about and connect with Sharmadean on Twitter at @SharmadeanReid

LISTEN HERE


‘She Talks Tech’ brings you stories, lessons and tips from some of the most inspirational women (and men!) in tech.

From robotics and drones, to fintech, neurodiversity and coronavirus apps; these incredible speakers are opening up to give us the latest information on tech in 2020.

Vanessa Valleley OBE, founder of WeAreTheCity and WeAreTechWomen brings you this latest resource to help you rise to the top of the tech industry. Women in tech make up just 17 per cent of the industry in the UK and we want to inspire that to change.

WeAreTechWomen are delighted to bring this very inspiring first series to wherever you normally listen to podcasts – and the first three episodes are now live!

So subscribe, rate the podcast and give it a 5-star review – and keep listening every Wednesday morning for a new episode of ‘She Talks Tech’.

Produced by Pineapple Audio Production.


Seema-Khinda-Johnson-featured

Inspirational Woman: Seema Khinda-Johnson | Co-Founder & COO, Nuggets

 

Seema Khinda Johnson

Seema Khinda Johnson is the Co-Founder and COO of Nuggets

Nuggets is an e-commerce payments and ID platform. It stores your personal and payment data securely in the blockchain, so you never have to share it with anyone – not even Nuggets.

Tell us a bit about yourself, background and your current role

I’ve worked for a variety of companies including Skype and Microsoft, and gathered a lot of strategic experience leading teams and delivering large-scale commercialization, products, and projects.  In 2016 I co-founded Nuggets, where I’m now the COO.

Nuggets is an ecommerce payments and ID platform that stores personal and payment data securely in the blockchain. That means you can pay, log in or verify your identity without having to share your data with anyone - including Nuggets itself.

Did you ever sit down and plan your career?

Not exactly – my career has grown fairly organically. I began as a production coordinator at a digital agency, managing technical and creative teams, and progressed into leading and managing delivery and operations. After that, I found myself building larger teams, and leading product and go-to-market for global businesses and start-ups.

Have you faced any challenges along the way?

There have certainly been a few! The speed of the blockchain industry and how quickly the technology moves is something I haven't experienced before. Additionally an ongoing challenge is hiring the best people and finding the right talent for the company to grow and scale to meet demand.

How do you feel about mentoring? Have you mentored anyone or are you someone’s mentee?

I think it’s a great thing. Role models are essential to just about everything in life, and business is no exception. A good mentor does so many things. As well as sharing skills and expertise, they demonstrate the power of a positive attitude, showing as much as telling you how to progress. They have to be people who take a real personal interest in the mentoring relationship, giving guidance and constructive feedback all along the way. And they need to be goal-oriented, I think: setting and meeting goals for themselves and their mentee, personally and professionally.

Sponsors are just as important. Carla Harris gave a fantastic Ted talk on this topic – tearing apart the idea of a ‘lone wolf’ meritocracy, where individuals can get ahead by working hard. Instead, relationships should be forged with a sponsor, who will make your voice heard in meetings and have your back!

What do you want to see happen within the next five years when it comes to diversity?

There’s definite momentum, but it’s going to take some time to see a more balanced playing field in tech. It’s a traditionally male-dominated industry, but given its immense role in the digital age, it’s critical that we reverse that trend. As a blockchain proponent, I’m of the strong opinion that the technology can be used for greater inclusion around the world.

I’d love to see more VC money made accessible to women leading great projects, so more female-driven startups can succeed. We need more female leaders and role models, not only in blockchain, but also in the wider tech industry. We need to raise their profile, to inspire girls and young women to pursue STEM subjects as a springboard into these industries. We need as many women interested in this industry as possible.

How would you encourage more young girls and women into a career in STEM?

I think there are three aspects to this. First, learning. These days anyone with a web connection can access years’ worth of educational materials – from webinars and books to technical papers – catering to every part of the learning curve. And this is such a nascent space – now is the time to dive in.

Then there’s support. We need to support each other by sharing learnings. Things move incredibly fast in this space, and we’re all experiencing different facets of blockchain technology.

And lastly, getting involved. Hackathons, meetups and social media are great ways to interact with other people involved in every area of blockchain. I’d strongly recommend attending meetups to connect with like-minded people. There are innumerable fields in each of the STEM disciplines, so it’s important for all women to explore them and discover their passions.

What has been your biggest achievement to date?

I think my work with Nuggets has been one of the most rewarding experiences in my professional life. Given how new the technology is, it’s largely unchartered territory, and there are few precedents for tackling problems that arise. That said, the sense of satisfaction you get from finding a solution is unparalleled! We’ve come incredibly far already, receiving a number of awards and forging some hugely significant partnerships.

What is your next challenge and what are you hoping to achieve in the future?

There are so many answers to both of those! Nuggets is evolving into a movement for good: we really want to change the way companies hold and manage data. Across the world, we’re all forced to share a host of sensitive, valuable information just to make purchases or use services. That means sacrificing privacy and security. It’s something we’ve been conditioned to do over recent years, but it can’t go on. This model is fundamentally broken.

I’m so proud to be part of a project that gives people control back over their personal data. But I want to do much more. That’s why, at Nuggets,, we will always give a portion of transaction fees  to charity. Of course we want to grow – but we want good causes to grow with us too.


woman using tablet, women in tech, CMI

Calling all job seekers! CMI are expanding their tech team

woman using tablet, women in tech, CMI

The Chartered Management Institute (CMI) is the only Chartered Body for Management and Leadership, working with business and education to inspire people to become skilled, confident and successful managers and leaders.

CMI are committed to transforming accidental managers into conscious, inclusive leaders.

What’s going on?

It’s an exciting time at CMI at the moment, as they are expanding their Technology team significantly to allow them to continue on their roadmap of tech transformation. CMI are looking to fill a variety of roles from engineers to analysts, as well as roles focused on data, cyber security and service.

What they're looking for?

CMI looking for passionate, agile innovators who can collaborate well in a diverse and inclusive team environment.

They have a number of exciting vacancies for experienced Software Developers/Engineers and Lead Engineers to support their tech team with integrating new services (applications and infrastructure) into their existing portfolio, modernising legacy platforms and enabling their move to the cloud. The roles involve collaborating closely with both tech and business colleagues across a variety of requirements & workstreams.

Benefits of working with us @ CMI

CMI pride ourselves on their approach to flexible working. They don’t define what flexible means - they let you do that. CMI give our people the freedom to do their jobs in a way that works best for them - regardless of where or when that is.

As the UK’s experts on Management & Leadership, they know the importance and impact a positive and engaging workplace culture has on success and as such, you will be joining a warm community of CMI employees in a supportive, flexible environment.  CMI are proud to be the two per cent of companies who have achieved Investors in People Platinum Accreditation.

They offer generous holidays and a health care plan alongside a wealth of opportunities for people to develop themselves both personally and professionally.

How do I apply?

If you want to be part of the growing community of passionate tech professionals, take a look at the vacancies on LinkedIn and for more information about CMI, please visit their website.

CMI logo


If you are a job seeker or someone looking to boost their career, then WeAreTechWomen has thousands of free career-related articles. From interview tips, CV advice to training and working from home, you can find all our career advice articles here.