WeAreTechWomen & Funding Circle - The Big Tech Meet Up 800x600

WeAreTechWomen & Funding Circle host inspiring & motivating network evening at the Big Tech Meet Up

WeAreTechWomen & Funding Circle - The Big Tech Meet Up

This week, WeAreTheCity gathered its WeAreTechWomen Women in Tech community for an action packed evening of career planning in the heart of the City of London.

The event was kindly sponsored and hosted by Funding Circle and was attend by over 50 women who work in various technology roles from across the UK.

During the event, Vanessa Vallely OBE shared her keynote which talks about her own career as a technologist and touches on hints and tips to overcome your inner imposter, how to harness your personal brand, how to build your network, how to optimise your digital footprint on line and the importance of coaches, mentors and sponsors in your career. The event was opened by Bruno Tavares who has recently joined Funding Circle as VP of Engineering.

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"What an inspiring event with so many amazing women working in technology. A huge thanks to Funding Circle and to Katie and Bruno for their fantastic hospitality, and to all our guests that brought their energy and passion to progress in their careers in tech. It was so wonderful to see so many new faces, alongside a number of our previous award winners. A great evening all round"

— Vanessa Vallely OBE, Founder, WeAreTheCity & WeAreTechWomen

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Meet develop: an organisation helping introduce young children to STEM careers through new partnership

develop team with Canon Barnett STEM partnership

develop, a London-based software engineering recruitment firm, is donating £20,000 to a Tower Hamlets primary school to fund STEM education.

develop, which operates in London, Berlin and Miami, will donate £25 to Canon Barnett Primary School in Tower Hamlets for every placement it makes in the next financial year.

Based on 2021/22 figures, this will amount to a total of over £20,000 going directly towards STEM education in the form of toys, learning platforms, and equipment.

‘develop’ is hoping to help reverse the talent shortages in the software engineering industry by providing help at grass roots level to directly impact the education and prospects of inner-city children.

A recent UK survey of nearly 10,000 primary school children shows that only 17 per cent aspired to a career in science despite the overwhelming growth of the UK’s STEM industries.

In this article, we get an insight from develop and Canon Barnett Primary School and get their views on the partnership, why it’s important and getting young children into the STEM space.

Let’s meet Amy and Agata to discuss the partnership and how it will help support young children’s STEM education. 

Meet Amy Moore, Senior Marketing Manager at develop

Amy is the Senior Marketing Manager at develop. Here, we talk to Amy about develop’s decision to partner with Canon Barnett Primary School, the aims of this partnership and how we can encourage more girls into STEM careers.

Amy Moore

develop are donating £25 per placement to a primary school in Tower Hamlets – can you tell us more about this?

develop are incredibly proud to announce our partnership with Canon Barnett Primary School. For every placement we make this financial year we’re going to donate £25 to the school to fund important STEM toys and resources for the pupils. Based on our statistics from last year, the donation should amount to more than £20,000.

What are the aims of this partnership?

We see the skills gap in tech talent every day, and we know that in order to fix the pipeline issue it starts from educating people from a young age. Through our partnership with Canon Barnett Primary School, we want to provide resources to the pupils that open up a new world of possibilities to them, allowing them to explore careers that they haven’t considered. The earlier that opportunities are presented, the bigger impact they can have.

What more can be done to help tackle the talent shortages in STEM?

Young women aren’t considering technology careers as they grow up because they don’t have the encouragement to pursue a career in tech, and they are not being exposed to what working in the sector involves. This then creates a lack of role models and leaders for children to aspire to, and the cycle continues for the next generation.

Businesses are struggling to hire for roles. There aren’t enough Engineers out there to meet the demand, and this is only worsening over time – the tech talent shortage is no longer a female-only issue, it impacts everyone.

How can we encourage more girls into STEM careers?

Providing girls with the resources and information from a young age is crucial in encouraging them to pursue a STEM career. Technical skills are transferable, and benefit people in all aspects of their life whether that’s at school, in the workplace or at home.

Introducing coding courses into the core curriculum is one way that allows children to explore a range of careers in their day-to-day schooling.

Early exposure is crucial in dismantling assumptions that tech isn’t a career for girls.

Educating children and young people to explore career opportunities in tech is needed in order to inspire the next generation of tech talent. Awareness and investment in the early part of the talent pipeline should be a priority for all organisations.

Meet Agata Glonek, Science Lead at Canon Barnett Primary School

Agata is the Science Lead at Canon Barnett Primary School. Here, we discuss with Agata how the partnership came about, how it will impact their pupils and why it’s important to support STEM education.

You’re partnering with develop to support your STEM education – how did this come about?

develop reached out to us, as we’re local to their office and they were looking for an inner-city primary to partner with so they could really benefit the STEM education of younger children. They wanted to find out about our existing STEM initiatives, what our needs were and how they could supplement that. We were really excited about what develop wanted to offer, and the impact it would have on the children.

What impact will the funding offer to your pupils?

The funding is going to give the children opportunities that they would have never been able to have themselves. As a school, we would not have been able to afford the resources needed for STEM education of this quality or exposed them to the different types of careers that they probably haven’t even heard of before.

The children will now be able to access STEM education to see that technology is everywhere and there are various paths they can follow. I think there really needs to be more awareness that there is so much more out there, and technology is such a big factor in our lives. It’s everywhere, so we need to expose children more to those kind of tech areas that they probably are going to find themselves working in because, truth to be told, that’s where we’re heading. Tech is a huge industry in the UK and constantly developing and changing so it’s really beneficial for children to hear about that at a young age.

How important is it to support STEM education on a grass-roots level?

Children don’t know what exists unless they are exposed to it. When we ask our pupils what they’d like to do when they grow up, the choices are very, very standardised and very limited. They tell us they want to be a teacher, because that’s who they see every day, or a doctor, because they are familiar with those roles.

Exposing them to the roles they are not familiar with or have not had the access to learn about is so important for them to make informed decisions about their future.

There will be jobs out there that probably haven’t been invented yet. Preparing them for that is very important and making sure that we offer them a range of choices so they can really see what different types of jobs and workplaces are there, is really crucial at primary age.

How can we encourage more girls into STEM careers?

We need to include more tech-based learning and activities in Science and Maths curriculums to ensure STEM education is more accessible for girls, and to teach them from a young age that they are capable of achieving the career they want. We should be connecting the subjects in more relevant ways that show our children the types of experiences that are available to them.

If girls don’t know what is out there, how are they going to aspire to do something?

STEM careers are for everyone and should not conform to any traditional gender stereotypes. We want all of our pupils to aspire to what they would like to do and never feel that their gender should stand in the way of that.


She Talks Tech - Enabling an Improved Customer & Colleague Experience Through Better Use of Technology' with Cheryl Stevens, DWP Digital, 800x600

Listen to our latest She Talks Tech podcast on 'Enabling an Improved Customer & Colleague Experience Through Better Use of Technology' with Cheryl Stevens, DWP Digital

She Talks Tech - Enabling an Improved Customer & Colleague Experience Through Better Use of Technology' with Cheryl Stevens, DWP Digital

In this session of She Talks Tech, Cheryl Stevens, Digital Director of Shared Channel Experience at DWP, describes how her department is leading the transformation of simplified experiences for colleagues and customers driven by life events and other user needs, regardless of channel or service line, and how this enables safe, efficient, inclusive and consistent journeys across DWP.

If you want to find out more about Cheryl – you can connect with her on LinkedIn.

LISTEN HERE

‘She Talks Tech’ brings you stories, lessons and tips from some of the most inspirational women (and men!) in tech.

From robotics and drones, to fintech, neurodiversity and coronavirus apps; these incredible speakers are opening up to give us the latest information on tech in 2022.

Vanessa Valleley OBE, founder of WeAreTheCity and WeAreTechWomen brings you this latest resource to help you rise to the top of the tech industry. Women in tech make up just 21 per cent of the industry in the UK and we want to inspire that to change.

WeAreTechWomen are delighted to bring this very inspiring first series to wherever you normally listen to podcasts!

So subscribe, rate the podcast and give it a 5-star review – and keep listening every Wednesday morning for a new episode of ‘She Talks Tech’.

Produced by Pineapple Audio Production.

Listen to more episodes of She Talks Tech here


TechWomen100: What happened next for Saima Sadiq

What happened next for Saima Sadiq?

In this ongoing series, we speak to our winners about life after winning a TechWomen100 Award.

Now in their sixth year, the TechWomen100 Awards recognise and celebrate the achievements of women in tech – the emerging tech talent and role models for the future.

We spoke with Saima Sadiq, who won a TechWomen100 Award in 2021.

Saima Sadiq

I started my technology career fresh out of college as a young 19 year old helping Sky TV customers with their technical equipment issues (and then broadband and mobile technical support when these products came along).

I’ve worked in a variety of roles with increasing levels of responsibility and escalation resolution. In 2012 I moved in to project management and became responsible for some of Sky’s high profile and strategic projects which gave be an opening and insight into a whole different world of technology. This is when I truly became involved in STEM and the growth opportunities within this field for women. Until this point, not only did I not have much awareness of STEM and what this meant but also what this could mean in terms of a long term fulfilling career. 2017, following the e birth of my youngest son at the age of 35 years old I decided to take the leap after 18 years at Sky TV and branch out in to the technology world and took up a position as Senior Program Manager at Mastercard Payment Gateway Services and have never looked back. Payments technology is a fascinating field that we all take for granted but learning and growing my knowledge in this field has really opened my eyes and ignited a new passion in my life. I am part of the group that work with young primary school aged girls as part of the Girls4Tech program to tech them about STEM and the job and career opportunities that are open to them. I now work as the Lead Technical Program Manager for MPGS in Europe leading a high performing team of Technical Program Managers delivering strategic business change working closely with our Product and Engineering partner teams.

How did you feel when it was announced that you’d won a TechWomen100 award?

I was extremely proud and truly humbled to have won the TechWomen100 award. I have worked extremely hard in my career and have taken many falls along the way but always have risen stronger and more motivated and determined to succeed. 2019, 2020 and 2021 were extremely difficult years for me on both a professional and personal level so to have received this award was the ultimate recognition of hard work and commitment.

Please tell us what has happened in your career since winning the TechWomen100 award?

Since winning the TechWomen100 award, I have been called out in Mastercard’s Global and European and local colleague town halls, I have featured on our internal bulletin board, Mastercard HUB as well as Linkedin. I was fortunate enough to work with our comms and marketing team to have recorded a podcast which was published and shared on the Mastercard network and on socials such as our twitter, Facebook and Linkedin pages. In terms of my career, support from my immediate team and wider Mastercard payment gateway team has been phenomenal. I exceeded expectation and goals for my year end performance review and got really positive feedback and results and to top off what was a whirlwind end to and amazing year, I also secured an internal promotion to Director, Program Management with my new role still evolving but moving toward an amazing future!

What advice would you give to someone else going through the award’s process?

You will get back in life what you are willing to put in so believe in yourself – you are truly awesome! Winning is amazing but even to be recognised is a sign that you ARE making a difference. Keep it up and keep on shining!

What tips would you give to our other members to enhance their careers?

Build your network but stay true to yourself, bring your most true, authentic and confident self to work every single day. Persevere and don’t be shy to talk to your boss about where you want to go in your career.

Step out of your comfort zone but most importantly, own your own career.

Nobody owes it to you to help you succeed – you however owe it to yourself to go out there and get it!

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TechWomen100

Nominations now open!

The TechWomen100 awards are the first of their kind to focus solely on the female tech talent pipeline and recognise the impact of champions, companies and networks that are leading the way. Nominations are open via the WeAreTechWomen website until 12 August 2022.

NOMINATE NOW

Imposter syndrome, masks with happy or sad expressions.Bipolar disorder, fake faces and emotions.

Beating imposter syndrome: Tips and tricks from two women in tech

Imposter syndrome, masks with happy or sad expressions.Bipolar disorder, fake faces and emotions.

Imposter syndrome is loosely defined as doubting your abilities and feeling like a fraud.

As women in the workplace, imposter syndrome is something Sarah Murphy and Lisa Hampel from Clio are all too familiar with.

So, they thought it would be encouraging (and hopefully empowering) to share their stories with you.

Meet Sarah, Director of Marketing EMEA, Clio

Sarah Murphy, Clio

Before I joined Clio, I’d spent nine and a half years in the marketing world and in some pretty diverse roles.

I’d worked within Sky for six years but prior to joining Clio, spent the last three and a half years in various B2B start-ups. Working at Clio has given me the challenge that I was looking for, particularly in developing an EMEA team and launching an amazing product into new territories.

Imposter syndrome has certainly been a bit of block for me at times. I have found that, as both a mother and business professional, there is additional pressure because traditionally being a parent impacted a woman’s career, while men were often able to keep accelerating theirs. There’s still a lot of pressure to catch up in this context and that can force you to overcompensate.

We have moved on over the years to where women can continue to grow their careers alongside being parents, but there is an expectation that women will juggle everything and do it well!

This includes their career, home and social lives, which combined can contribute strongly to imposter syndrome.

That’s something I’m trying to counteract in my management style. To me, being the best leader and role model for your team means showing them the realities of your life instead of acting as if everything is perfect and never allowing the line between your personal and professional life to blur. If you need to finish work early to take your child to the doctor or go to a school play, that’s being a much better role model than working until 8pm and missing bedtime!

When companies provide assistance and leadership programmes that allow employees to express themselves with confidence, this can be massively beneficial to help employees overcome imposter syndrome. Clio has been fantastic in this regard and offers a number of programmes to help all employees succeed, including personalised development plans, mentorship programmes, one-to-one sessions with a career coach, regular discussion sessions on workplace challenges, leadership development programmes, and more.

My advice is to be clear about what you want to achieve and to put energy into building strong relationships, both within and outside of your company.

It is important to know what it is you want on your career journey and to discuss this with your manager regularly.

Building strong relationships helps you to build your own personal brand and it will help you to create visibility for your output, as well as yourself. You never know when an opportunity will arise but when it does don’t be afraid to jump into the unknown. Taking a chance on something new can be greatly rewarding and you don’t ever have to feel 100% ready for a step up.

Just go for it!

Meet Lisa, Senior Manager of Customer Success EMEA, Clio

Lisa Hampel

I’ve been at Clio for two and half years now but my career looked rather different some years ago.

I studied Psychology but I started my career working for an online games publisher and from there, I worked in a handful of tech companies before joining Clio. I joined Clio because I love working with agile and high-performing teams – challenging myself and finding new ways to grow motivates me.

Imposter syndrome definitely comes in waves for me, especially around the time of a big career opportunity. For a lot of my career, I didn’t feel like I really fit the image of what a “leader in tech” looks like.

Only after seeking out sponsors, mentors, and learning to be intentional in asking for help when I needed it, my pathway started to become a lot clearer.

From what I’ve seen, imposter syndrome affects anyone who dares to be introspective about their life. This is especially true if you don’t have a relatable example of where you want to go. The shining beacons of “success” in the workplace are still often cis-presenting, white and male – this does not seem very relatable to anyone who may not have these same attributes.

One thing that’s really helped me to navigate imposter syndrome is to challenge my own thinking. Often, the origins of imposter syndrome stem from the model we’ve created about our lives in our heads. Taking time to be introspective about what you can realistically achieve right now, as well as what you currently need and want, is immensely helpful. Learning to navigate this with kindness and patience is a study in itself but taking the doubts as an opportunity to question the status quo is not a bad thing and can help to drive real change.

Another thing that I find helpful is knowing that many people, including my own idols and colleagues, suffer from a version of imposter syndrome. At Clio, I feel fortunate to see leaders that are authentic and share examples of humanity. By encouraging staff to share stories and creating space for diversity of thought, there is a culture of acceptance and normality.

We are all human and will never know it all – accepting this is a big step.


S04E14 Day in the life of a software engineer SST

Listen to our latest She Talks Tech podcast on 'A Day in the Life of a Software Engineer' with DWP Digital

S04E14 Day in the life of a software engineer SST

A career in software engineering can open a lot of exciting doors for anyone, with it being one of the fastest-growing areas in the digital sector. 

Today on She Talks Tech, DWP Digital software engineers Chloe, Shivangi and Beth will share their journeys into tech. They discuss what a day-in-the-life of a software engineer looks like, as well as the different career paths into this field. They’ll also cover the difference between front-end and back-end, popular programming languages, and the use of API’s. Not to mention top tips to kick start your career in software engineering.

LISTEN HERE

‘She Talks Tech’ brings you stories, lessons and tips from some of the most inspirational women (and men!) in tech.

From robotics and drones, to fintech, neurodiversity and coronavirus apps; these incredible speakers are opening up to give us the latest information on tech in 2022.

Vanessa Valleley OBE, founder of WeAreTheCity and WeAreTechWomen brings you this latest resource to help you rise to the top of the tech industry. Women in tech make up just 21 per cent of the industry in the UK and we want to inspire that to change.

WeAreTechWomen are delighted to bring this very inspiring first series to wherever you normally listen to podcasts!

So subscribe, rate the podcast and give it a 5-star review – and keep listening every Wednesday morning for a new episode of ‘She Talks Tech’.

Produced by Pineapple Audio Production.

Listen to more episodes of She Talks Tech here


TechWomen100 2022 Banners (800 × 600 px)

One week to go until nominations open | TechWomen100 Awards 2022

TechWomen100 2022 Banners

Just one week to go until nominations open for the TechWomen100 Awards 2022.

It is no secret that the technology industry lacks female representation at all levels. Women make up just 17 per cent of the industry. There are some fantastic awards for women working in tech, however, most of these focus on senior women.

Whilst we feel it is extremely necessary to highlight senior and influential women, we also believe the pipeline of female technologists need a platform to shine.

This is why the TechWomen100 Awards were created. Our awards focus solely on women working in tech below director level. We hope that by highlighting the accolades of up-and-coming inspirational female tech talent, we can help to create a new generation of female role models for the industry, and a pipeline of future leaders.

The awards also feature a “Global Award for Achievement” category, to help expand our search for global talent. This category is a female individual who works within the tech industry outside of the UK, whose current position is below director level.

Through the awards, we would also like to recognise a number of senior individuals who are championing up-and-coming women, as well as any organisations that have designed and implemented successful initiatives and programmes in order to attract, retain and develop the female tech talent.

Finally, we applaud the often-voluntary efforts of the women in tech networks that operate across the UK, and again would like to formerly recognise these within our awards.

The TechWomen100 awards are the first of their kind to focus solely on the female tech talent pipeline and recognise the impact of champions, companies and networks that are leading the way.

The 2022 awards are kindly sponsored by Accenture, BAE Systems, Bank of America, BT, Clifford Chance, Credit Suisse, Funding Circle, Goldman Sachs, Huawei, Morgan Stanley, Northern Trust, Oliver Wyman, PwC and Sky.

The process

Nominations open online on 01 July via WeAreTechWomen. Nominations will close after a six-week period on 12 August.

A shortlist of 200 women from a range of technology disciplines will be chosen in October by an esteemed panel of judges. There will also be a shortlist of three Champions, Global Award of Achievement, Companies and Networks.

The shortlist will then be published and we will also open the TechWomen100 individual category for public votes of support.

Winners will be announced in October and celebrated at award’s ceremony on 06 December. There will be 100 winners of the TechWomen100, a Champion of the Year, a Global Award of Achievement, a Company of the Year and a Network of the Year.

Who should nominate?

  • Self-nominations are encouraged
  • Organisations looking to recognise their emerging talent pool
  • Organisation wishing to obtain recognition for their initiatives
  • Individuals who would like to recognise their efforts of their champions/role models
  • Individuals/colleagues/friends/clients/mentors/sponsors of the nominee

Award’s timeline

Nominations open
01 July 2022

Nominations close
12 August 2022

Shortlist announced
03 October 2022

Public vote opens
04 October 2022

Voting closes
07 October 2022

Winners announced
10 October 2022

Winner’s celebration event
06 December 2022


SPONSORED BY

TechWomen100 Sponsors 2022

TechWomen100 2022 Banners (800 × 600 px)

Two weeks to go until nominations open | TechWomen100 Awards 2022

TechWomen100 2022 Banners

Just two weeks to go until nominations open for the TechWomen100 Awards 2022.

It is no secret that the technology industry lacks female representation at all levels. Women make up just 17 per cent of the industry. There are some fantastic awards for women working in tech, however, most of these focus on senior women.

Whilst we feel it is extremely necessary to highlight senior and influential women, we also believe the pipeline of female technologists need a platform to shine.

This is why the TechWomen100 Awards were created. Our awards focus solely on women working in tech below director level. We hope that by highlighting the accolades of up-and-coming inspirational female tech talent, we can help to create a new generation of female role models for the industry, and a pipeline of future leaders.

The awards also feature a “Global Award for Achievement” category, to help expand our search for global talent. This category is a female individual who works within the tech industry outside of the UK, whose current position is below director level.

Through the awards, we would also like to recognise a number of senior individuals who are championing up-and-coming women, as well as any organisations that have designed and implemented successful initiatives and programmes in order to attract, retain and develop the female tech talent.

Finally, we applaud the often-voluntary efforts of the women in tech networks that operate across the UK, and again would like to formerly recognise these within our awards.

The TechWomen100 awards are the first of their kind to focus solely on the female tech talent pipeline and recognise the impact of champions, companies and networks that are leading the way.

The 2022 awards are kindly sponsored by Accenture, BAE Systems, Bank of America, BT, Clifford Chance, Credit Suisse, Funding Circle, Goldman Sachs, Huawei, Morgan Stanley, Northern Trust, Oliver Wyman, PwC and Sky.

The process

Nominations open online on 01 July via WeAreTechWomen. Nominations will close after a six-week period on 12 August.

A shortlist of 200 women from a range of technology disciplines will be chosen in October by an esteemed panel of judges. There will also be a shortlist of three Champions, Global Award of Achievement, Companies and Networks.

The shortlist will then be published and we will also open the TechWomen100 individual category for public votes of support.

Winners will be announced in October and celebrated at award’s ceremony on 06 December. There will be 100 winners of the TechWomen100, a Champion of the Year, a Global Award of Achievement, a Company of the Year and a Network of the Year.

Who should nominate?

  • Self-nominations are encouraged
  • Organisations looking to recognise their emerging talent pool
  • Organisation wishing to obtain recognition for their initiatives
  • Individuals who would like to recognise their efforts of their champions/role models
  • Individuals/colleagues/friends/clients/mentors/sponsors of the nominee

Award’s timeline

Nominations open
01 July 2022

Nominations close
12 August 2022

Shortlist announced
03 October 2022

Public vote opens
04 October 2022

Voting closes
07 October 2022

Winners announced
10 October 2022

Winner’s celebration event
06 December 2022


SPONSORED BY

TechWomen100 Sponsors 2022

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The STEM Returners Index 2022 | STEM Returners

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The STEM Returners Index is an annual survey with UK STEM professionals who are on a career break, attempting to return to work or recently returned.

We know that STEM professionals on career breaks face hidden barriers when attempting to return to work. The STEM Returners Index aims to further understand these barriers, track the progress UK STEM industries are making with solving them, and shine a light on the change needed to create fair opportunities for all.

This year we are pleased to launch the 2nd annual STEM Returners Index, based on a survey completed by over 1000 STEM professionals in April 2022.

DOWNLOAD THE REPORT

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Recruitment bias preventing talented engineers from returning to work after a career break

Returning to work, recruitment bias, Unhappy woman with resume rejected by employer vector flat illustration.

Bias in the recruitment process prevents STEM professionals who have had a career break return to employment, according to a new survey by STEM Returners.

The STEM Returners Index, published on International Women in Engineering Day, showed bias against age, gender and lack of recent experience to be the main barriers to entry.

The Index asked more than 1,000 STEM professionals on a career break a range of questions to understand their experiences of trying to re-enter the STEM sector.

of women feel they've experienced bias in recruitment

of women think childcare responsibilities are a barrier to returning to work

of men more likely to be victim of age-related bias

Nearly a third of women said they feel they have personally experienced bias in recruitment processes due to their gender compared to seven per cent of men.

Despite 39 per cent of females wanting to return to work due to children now being of school age, 40 per cent of females still feel childcare responsibilities are a barrier to returning due to lack of flexibility offered by employers.

In the survey, men (46 per cent) were more likely to be victim of bias because of their age compared to women (38 per cent). Bias also appears to become more prevalent with age, with more than half of over 55’s saying they have experienced personal bias, compared to as low as 23 per cent in younger age groups.

The Index also asked returners about the impact of Covid on their experience. 34 per cent said the pandemic made getting back to work more difficult than it would have been already. It would also appear that for many people, Covid was the catalyst for a career break that they might not have taken otherwise, as 36 per cent said Covid was a factor in their decision to take a career break. Redundancy was also on the rise year on year as a reason for career breaks according to the results.

STEM Returners has conducted the STEM Returners Index for the past two years. The programme helps highly qualified and experienced STEM professionals return to work after a career break by working with employers to facilitate paid short-term employment placements. More than 260 engineers have returned to work through the scheme across the UK since it began in 2017.

Speaking about the findings, Natalie Desty, Director of STEM Returners, said, “We know that the engineering sector faces a significant skills shortage and yet this group of talented and dedicated individuals are still overlooked.”

“It’s disappointing to see that 66 per cent of STEM professionals on a career break are finding the process of attempting to return to work either difficult or very difficult and that nearly half (46 per cent) of participants said they felt bias because of a lack of recent experience.”

“This situation is being made even harder with more redundancies and more people wanting to return to work due to uncertainty about the economy and the rising cost of living leading to a wider pool of potential returners.”

“There is a perception that a career break automatically leads to a deterioration of skills.”

“But the reality is, that many people on a career break keep themselves up to date with their industry, can refresh their skills easily when back in work and have developed new transferable skills that would actually benefit their employers.”

“Industry leaders need to do more to update recruitment practices and challenge unconscious bias to help those who are finding it challenging to return to the sector and improve diversity and inclusion within their organisations.”

DOWNLOAD THE FULL REPORT
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