watching a virtual conference on a laptop, zoom call, video call

Can virtual onboarding attract top talent?

Article by Kirsty Carter, Solutionize Global

watching a virtual conference on a laptop, zoom call, video callJoining an organisation can be both daunting and exhilarating.

However, when new and future recruits are unable to meet their colleagues face-to-face or even get a feel for what their physical office space might look like – especially during a global crisis – can they really get to know their company and be a part of the team?

The truth is, they absolutely can. That’s because – when it’s done right – hiring and settling in a talented individual exclusively online can help to break down any ‘formal’ barriers. It also provides a more time and cost-efficient process for both parties and takes away any issues that might occur from commuting.

This is, of course, all on the basis that the correct planning has been completed beforehand, and there is a structure in place that is agile enough to welcome a new recruit into the team seamlessly – even when they’ve never stepped foot into the office.

Now known as ‘virtual onboarding’, this way of embedding a colleague provides an alternative option for many organisations that are continuing to navigate the pressures that come with growing a business during a pandemic – and beyond.

For several modern-day firms, they’re exploring fresh and exciting ways in which they not only attract the brightest talent but retain their future services too. And virtual onboarding can play a pivotal role in driving many employment models forward, as a result.

That’s because a technology-first approach presents so many opportunities for employees that want to work flexibly and remotely – or via a hybrid mix of an office and home setting.

From an enterprise’s point of view, it widens the talent pool geographically and – if they’ve hired effectively – means that new additions can operate autonomously and settle in quickly to a supportive team culture.

Easing any ‘first day’ nerves

In the first few moments at a new firm, employees are typically looking to understand internal operations swiftly, get to know their colleagues and hit the ground running in a positive way.

And with technology enabling that process to all be done virtually, this can help individuals feel as though they’re receiving as good – if not better – of a welcome compared to stepping foot into the physical office for the first time.

Utilising video conferencing tools can ensure communication remains a high priority and any questions that a new employee has, can be made without vast disruption, or spending the time booking a meeting room to have a quiet conversation.

Speaking to colleagues can be made into more of a social event too – such as a virtual coffee morning – to avoid any intimidating, more ‘formal’ gatherings. And by inviting people into instant messaging groups and apps, these can all enhance the virtual onboarding process even further.

Creating leaders throughout the workforce

On the other side of the coin, a digital-first approach to talent recruitment can also empower existing members of the team. Encouraging them to host their own specialist sessions for a new recruit – whether social media, HR, or software demonstrations – can all help the workforce dynamic and upskill everyone as a result.

All of these elements form a critical part of a successful virtual onboarding process – and this can often only take days and weeks online rather than months and years to achieve in person.

And when things can be done seamlessly and swiftly, that means new additions can begin to add value as quickly as possible – and with that comes trust, loyalty, and employee ‘buy-in’ of an enterprise’s core values – because they feel like they’re being supported and motivated throughout.

Of course, virtual onboarding can take more planning and structure than when it’s done in a face-to-face environment. For example, employees who have joined a team and only operated online will require everything in place beforehand so they can truly hit the ground running from their first day. That means providing laptops, work phones, IT security software and passwords.

Ultimately, it’s about engaging with new staff, encouraging the wider team to get involved, and being flexible and communicative throughout. Providing an alternative, agile way to embed a recruit can open up more doors to attract a wider talent pool, and could help firms take a huge leap forward when it comes to tackling the ongoing technological skills shortage.

Kirsty Carter, chief of staff, Solutionize GlobalAbout the author

Attracting, developing and engaging the very best people at Solutionize Global is just one of Kirsty’s specialisms in the business. Embodying the technology solutions and services provider’s commitment to reliability and availability, she works tirelessly to ensure the team is the most successful version of itself.

A devotee to ensuring that the enterprise’s culture strikes the right balance of support and self-motivation, Kirsty recognises that empowering employees to fly, in turn, provides clear benefits to customers and drives growth throughout the organisation.


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Dan Zinkin

HeForShe: Dan Zinkin | Managing Director & Head of Tech for Global Investment & Corporate Banking, J.P. Morgan

Dan ZinkinA 22 year veteran of JPMorgan, Dan has worked in a number of roles across the Corporate & Investment Bank, bridging Operations, Strategic Projects, Business Management and, since 2010, Technology.

Dan leads technology for JPMorgan Global Investment Banking & Corporate Banking including our Digital Investment Banking strategy and core M&A, Capital Markets and Wholesale Payments Sales businesses.

In addition, Dan is broadly focused on the EMEA innovation agenda and connectivity with FinTech in the region. He spends time with clients sharing JPMorgan’s insights and activities across the fast-changing tech landscape. Dan is a passionate champion of diversity and philanthropy, bringing innovation to both areas at JPMorgan.

Dan’s most recent prior role was the EMEA lead for the Global Technology Strategy, Innovations & Partnerships team focused on developing IT strategy, innovation and emerging technology relationships aligned to the Corporate & Investment Bank and CRM strategy firmwide.

Outside of JPMorgan, Dan was a co-founder of SimGuard, a (failed) mobile tech startup in the first dotcom phase ('98-'01). Dan received a B.A. in International History & Politics from the University of Leeds, England.

Why do you support the HeForShe campaign? For example – have you witnessed the benefits that diversity can bring to a workplace?

It’s crazy we have to ask that question! Who wouldn’t support efforts to drive a more inclusive environment? The evidence is clear that more diverse firms deliver better results and morally and socially it’s clearly the right thing to do. I have personally witnessed and benefited from a more diverse workplace, seeing the culture, perspectives and impact of my team improve as we have grown our female leadership. That said it didn’t and shouldn’t take witnessing it personally to believe and take action to address the inequalities and inequities of the past. Anyone who somehow still needs persuading should go read Caroline Criado Perez’s awesome book “Invisible Women” to get some perspective.

Why do you think it’s important for men to support gender equality in the workplace?

Pretty much every injustice in the world that has been addressed (or at least made meaningful progress) has required those with power or privilege to support those without. It is incumbent on men to be key sponsors, mentors, enablers, barrier-removers and change agents.

More specifically in the workplace: do you want your company and your specific team to perform better? If so, the data is pretty clear that diversity will have a positive impact on your results.

How welcome are men in the gender equality conversation currently?

Within JPMorgan we have multiple initiatives for different levels of experience and roles (e.g. Tech versus Finance etc). My experience has been fantastic working with multiple programs and have had the opportunity to listen and learn to better understand the challenges, as well as provide mentoring, support and lead initiatives to drive change.

Externally it takes a little more effort, which is fair, to demonstrate you are there to help and drive change, not just build profile or talk. Incidentally, I do think the proliferation of overlapping initiatives is partly due to people wanting to be the leader and get the credit and over time I think to really drive change there will need to be some scaling up of the most impactful organizations.

In any case, men are likely still more welcome in these conversations than women are in many business contexts, so let’s focus on fixing that.

Do you think groups/networks that include the words “women in…” or “females in…” make men feel like gender equality isn’t really their problem or something they need to help with?

It is a really interesting question. I co-founded and ran a program (Associate Women’s Program) for almost 6yrs at JPMorgan for mid-career women specifically targeting the next promotion and ever year 2 things happened: at least one female participant would tell me that they resented the fact we had created this program specifically for women as they did not “need special help” to progress; and some number of men would complain to me how unfair it was that they did not have the same help to get promoted. I would always answer simply by pointing them to the data showing clearly that historically men were more likely to get promoted (outperforming their proportion of any mid/senior level). The program made a measurable difference, but there remains a long way to go.
More broadly, I think the growth of programs such as JPMorgan’s “Men as Allies” does bring home the message that men need to play a role but needs to reach more people.

What can businesses do to encourage more men to feel welcome enough to get involved in the gender debate?

I think successful men and women in business get involved in many things where they don’t initially feel welcome. They dive in because they see a problem or opportunity to grow or protect their business. Diversity needs to be seen through that lens. It is an imperative, not soft, side issue.

Do you currently mentor any women or have you in the past?

I mentor multiple women, some formally and others informally. Mentoring done well is a two-way street and mentors learn as much as they share.
I also led JPMorgan to become the sponsor of Finding Ada’s Network – a mentoring platform – where 50 JPMorgan female employees mentor a diverse range of external women in STEM.

Have you noticed any difference in mentoring women – for example, are women less likely to put themselves forward for jobs that are out of their comfort zones or are women less likely to identify senior roles that they would be suited for?

I have personally seen real-life confirmation of many of the clichés we hear about women opting out of promotions, or not being willing to ask for what they deserve (roles, pay, opportunities etc). Interestingly I have also noticed a misplaced (in my view) belief that the “right thing” will happen without them having to speak up or make it happen. Maybe as teams become more diverse, with more women in leadership roles noticing things that today’s predominantly male leaders may miss, that will become true, but for now, the old rules generally apply and hope/belief is not a good strategy.


WeAreTechWomen has a back catalogue of thousands of HeForShe interviews, including Christian Edelmann, George Brasher, Stephen Mercer and many more. You can read about all the amazing men championing gender equality here


Amy Choi featured

Inspirational Woman: Amy Choi | Director of Product, Lion Studios

Amy Choi

I’m a Director of Product at Lion Studios where I oversee our Product Management, Game Design, and Quality Assurance (QA) teams.

I work closely with our Game Designers, Analysts, Engineers, Artists, and with other teams across the business to create and execute on the product roadmaps for our titles.

I’ve always been an avid gamer and after college, I joined a mobile ad tech company where I worked with game developers on ad monetization. I really enjoyed working with game developers, but wanted to delve deeper into the product side and work directly on all aspects of a mobile game. I then joined Lion Studios as its first Product Manager, and have grown tremendously since starting two years ago.

I most recently led the launch of one of Lion Studio’s newest games, Ancient Battle. Players assemble their army with unique and powerful troops, collect items and runes to enhance their power, and discover new lands in a fight for glory.

Ancient Battle was the first game Lion Studios co-developed with another studio and is the latest example of how we continue to evolve and diversify our games and publishing services. We worked with Chinese developer Mandrill VR to reimagine all of the characters, buildings, and animations, and paired this with custom sound effects to give the game a fully-immersive, high-quality finish. We’re really pleased with the work we’ve done and the reception we’ve gotten so far!

Did you ever sit down and plan your career?

After college, I was really intrigued by the Product Manager path since it’s such an interdisciplinary role – I loved the idea of collaborating across teams and really digging into end user behavior. As a Product Manager in games, many people assume I have a technical background but I actually studied Neurobiology and French Literature in college. You don’t need to have an engineering degree in order to do this job – if you love games, all you need is a willingness to try new things and test your assumptions. I find that game industry veterans come from a wide range of academic and professional backgrounds – this is one of my favorite things about working in this space.

Have you faced any career challenges along the way and how did you overcome these?

When I joined Lion Studios, there were a lot of firsts. I was the first Product Manager on the team, it was my first time on the product side, and my first time working directly on games.

I’m really fortunate to have landed at a studio that embraces continual learning and testing, and I really took advantage of this when I first started. I had a steep learning curve my first year with lots of missteps and questions asked, but ramped up very quickly as a result.

What has been your biggest career achievement to date?

Building Ancient Battle up to be a sustainable game has been one of my biggest and most rewarding career milestones. As both the Product Manager and the acting Project Manager on this game, I had to ensure all things game-related were running smoothly. This meant balancing competing art, engineering, analytics, and monetization priorities across different time zones.

What one thing do you believe has been a major factor in you achieving success? 

The ability to try new things! With each role I’ve had, I had the opportunity to take on the widest responsibility I can handle. This ensures I’m always growing and never getting too comfortable with the status quo. I’ve also been fortunate to have managers that have encouraged me to try new things and as I’ve built my team, I continue to look for opportunities where my team can learn new skills and expand into new areas.

What top tips would you give to an individual who is trying to excel in their career in the video game industry?

Live and breathe data!! Most roles in game development heavily leverage data to create, publish, and grow games. Even if you’re new to gaming, having a solid understanding of data and the ability to critically analyze different key performance indicators (KPIs) is an important skill that pays off whether you’re a Product Manager or a Game Designer.

Do you believe there are still barriers for success for women working in tech, if so, how can these barriers be overcome?

We still see a shortage of women in the industry, and especially so in leadership roles. We need to increase the visibility of female executives and normalize women in decision-making roles. Female-centric recruiting practices can also really increase the volume of strong female candidates in your pipeline. Last but not least, companies should listen to their female employees and ensure they’re retained–they’re your strongest advocates and the path to a more inclusive and diverse workplace starts with them!

What do you think companies can do to support the progress of the careers of women working in technology?

In addition to reviewing hiring practices, hosting events that empower female leadership and programs that encourage diversity can normalize the idea of women in leadership and amplify their voices. At AppLovin, we host quarterly events that spotlight a strong female leader who has found success in a male-dominated industry like tech. We’ve also hosted ladies’ happy hours at Lion Studios, and they’ve been great opportunities to connect with female colleagues and celebrate their achievements.

What resources do you recommend for women working in tech?

I recently discovered GameChangers, a webinar series that highlights women in gaming and revolves around a wide variety of topics ranging from User Acquisition to mental health. I’d encourage women working in tech to really connect with other women in the workplace and use each other as a resource.


WeAreTechWomen has a back catalogue of thousands of Inspirational Woman interviews, including Professor Sue Black OBE, Debbie Forster MBE, Jacqueline de Rojas CBE, Dr Anne-Marie Imafidon MBE and many more. You can read about all our amazing women here

 


Nicky Tozer featured

Inspirational Woman: Nicky Tozer | EMEA Vice President, Oracle NetSuite

Nicky Tozer As Oracle NetSuite’s EMEA Vice President, I’m responsible for driving sales strategy, operations, and building and leading a world class organisation across Europe, the Middle East and Africa, taking our strong footprint in the region to another level.

Prior to this role, I led Oracle NetSuite in Northern Europe, and established NetSuite’s presence across Benelux and the Nordics.

Before NetSuite, I spent 5 years working within the Oracle Applications business across the Manufacturing, Retail and Distribution industry sectors. I now have over 20 years of experience in the IT industry and have worked across a number of disciplines in the field of ERP, CRM, EPM and Business Intelligence. I’ve also got two degrees in the fields of Management Science and Psychology.

Did you ever sit down and plan your career?

Well, I was originally looking for a career that would fit with my degree. I went to Keele University and took a Management Science degree with French and German, which set me up well to start out in my career – learning the ins and outs of business and with the ability to apply those skills on a more international level. The role that got me to where I am today was working as a receptionist at a software company. I worked hard, and was asked to join the telemarketing team, which is where I got my first job in sales and started on the path I’m still on today.

Have you faced any career challenges along the way and how did you overcome these?

For me, staying focused on what needs achieving – in spite of barriers and hurdles – has made me the professional that I am today. There is a perception that technology is a traditionally male-dominated field, but I never considered my career trajectory in terms of being a woman in a predominantly male environment. It may sound a little blasé, but I always got on with doing my job to the best of my abilities and I’m proud of my achievements. That isn’t to underplay the fact that, across all industries and professions, there is much to do to ensure men and women are consistently on an equal footing.

I try to see both sides of a potential barrier. The predominantly male tech environment never represented a major problem. There were times when I would walk in as the only female sales rep with my team, and, often, everyone would direct the questions at the guys. But I found that when there was an opportunity to say something credible, they would say, ‘she knows what she’s talking about’ and opinions quickly changed. Also, being female meant they remembered me.

What has been your biggest career achievement to date?

I’m very proud to have been entrusted to lead NetSuite across the EMEA region. Seeing the success that we’ve had as an organisation feels very meaningful. I also have a lot of pride in how our employees have adapted to the experiences that 2020 has thrown at us. It’s also been great to have been recognised by peers too, being named in CRN’s 2020 Women of the Channel, and having been shortlisted for Business Leader of the Year at the Women in IT Awards earlier this year.

What one thing do you believe has been a major factor in you achieving success?

I’ve benefitted greatly from seeking support from other like-minded professionals. One-on-one mentoring allows women to focus on their career paths and their own strengths and aspirations. Throughout my career, I have got to know many ambitious women – one of my closest friends is the CFO of a bank and her insights have given me a lot of direction and motivation over the years. It’s these natural relationships that I encourage women to nurture and draw inspiration from.

What top tips would you give to a woman who is trying to excel in their career in technology?

The strongest bit of advice I can give to any woman wanting to get to the top of their profession is this: you – and only you – will be the person responsible for your success. Consider your strengths and weaknesses, what you want to achieve and acknowledge where the challenges are; but don’t make them the thing that defines you. Understand that these challenges may be barriers and work out how to navigate them. Talk to people, whether it’s a mentor or a confident person in your peer group who can help you highlight what you have to offer. If you are skilled at what you do, and can provide supporting evidence for your proposals, people have to listen.

It’s true there are some industries that are harder to crack for women, and I don’t want to shy away from that. But in my mind, it is always better to focus on what you want to achieve than what might hold you back. When you focus on what might inhibit you, you risk expending energy on the wrong things.

Do you believe there are still barriers for success for women working in tech, if so, how can these barriers be overcome?

I actually reflected on this very topic in a piece I wrote on International Women’s Day earlier this year. My summation was this – gender balance is improving, but we can still do better. While clearly there’s still a long way to go – take for example the female astronauts denied the opportunity to take part in the first all-female spacewalk because spacesuits were not designed with them in mind – we are seeing a wider pattern of continued change that is equipping future generations of women.

Historical imbalances can’t be changed, but incremental, consistent progress will ensure that equality is achieved. It’s my responsibility to hire a diverse group. Then we coach them to be the best, most confident individuals they can be, by providing an environment that allows that talent to come forward.

What do you think companies can do to support and progress the careers of women working in technology?

Once women (or men) do get into the technology industry, they may find it daunting. This is where mentorship is critical. Within Oracle, for over 14 years now groups like the Oracle Women’s Leadership Group (OWL) and Oracle Pride Employee Network (Open) have been on a mission to develop, engage and empower current and future generations of leaders within the business, allowing employees to develop their skills through workshops, webinars and support networks. These programmes deliver a tangible way for women – and men – to support one another.

There is currently only 17% of women working in tech, if you could wave a magic wand, what is the one thing you would do to accelerate the pace of change for women in the industry?

I wrote last year about the need to harness girls’ interests in STEM subjects. Instilling this confidence and belief in ‘traditional’ male fields has to start at an early age.

If I look at my career, I was the only woman in every room for a lot of it. We can also help the ones that are there to improve faster. Developing confidence and belief in women has to start at school.

What resources do you recommend for women working in tech?

Sifted does a great job of covering issues around diversity and inclusion in the startup sector. The Women in Technology Online Festival recently brought together a great range of speakers and will do so again next year. It’s also great to hear from women at the top of their fields as well. I’ve read books by Sheryl Sandberg and Michelle Obama to name a few. The amount of content out there is amazing, and continually growing. The only challenging bit is finding the time!


WeAreTechWomen has a back catalogue of thousands of Inspirational Woman interviews, including Professor Sue Black OBE, Debbie Forster MBE, Jacqueline de Rojas CBE, Dr Anne-Marie Imafidon MBE and many more. You can read about all our amazing women here


Bela Stepanova

Inspirational Woman: Bela Stepanova | VP of Product, Iterable

Bela Stepanova

Bela Stepanova is VP of Product at Iterable, a leading cross-channel marketing platform, where she’s been able to nurture her passion for building enterprise products with design and data science at the forefront. 

Bela has spent the last 14 years building products, used by millions of people across the globe. Prior to joining Iterable, she worked as a Sr. Director of Product at Box, where she led the Web product teams and founded Box’s Growth team. As a product leader, her biggest passion is people—from bringing a user-first mindset to B2B products, to building diverse teams and investing in the next generation of leaders.

Tell us a bit about yourself, background and your current role

I’ve spent the last 14 years building products, used by millions of people across the globe. As a product leader, my biggest passion is people—from bringing a user-first mindset to B2B products, to building diverse teams and investing in the next generation of leaders.

Prior to joining Iterable, I worked as a Sr. Director of Product at Box, where I led the Web product teams and founded Box’s Growth team. Before that, I ran product and engineering teams building large-scale financial platforms for Accenture clients. I also spent a few years helping global non-profits create and execute their CRM & e-commerce technology strategies.

I’ve been VP of Product at Iterable for 11 months now, where I’ve been able to nurture my passion for building enterprise products with design and data science at the forefront. This has been an incredible year of innovation for us. Our most recent product launch, Brand AffinityTM, is the first-ever intelligent personalisation solution to help marketers better measure customer sentiment.

Using AI technology, Brand Affinity is designed for marketers to transform customer communications based on their interests and engagement levels. The platform provides understanding  of customer sentiment at scale, helping marketers create effective messaging strategies. This was an exciting technology challenge to work on. And I’m incredibly proud of our team’s accomplishments and our impact. One particular example is near to my heart—by leveraging Brand Affinity in their customer journeys, dgtl fundraising doubled conversion of engaged prospects into regular donors for Alzheimer's research.

Did you ever sit down and plan your career?

Not in a traditional sense. To me, there are three major ingredients to a great career: trajectory of learning, opportunity to make an impact and most importantly the group of humans to share the journey with. I find that if you are able to bring those three aspects together, everything else follows.

When it comes to intellectual fulfillment, I continuously ask myself: do I have a big challenge to tackle and do I have an opportunity to have a meaningful impact? I love building our product at Iterable. From a reach point of view, we operate at one of the largest scales any software product can—collectively our customers interact with billions of people around the world. This kind of challenge keeps me excited to wake up every day—from the technology side to the product design possibilities. I get to work with our team to bring the latest and greatest of AI and data science to life, make our customers' lives easier via design decisions and re-imagine the ways technology can unlock human creativity.

And most importantly, it is all about people. At Iterable, I found a group of people who believe in each other, what we are trying to accomplish, and live every day with shared values of humility, balance, trust and growth mindset. The connections we make every day can define the rest of our careers and how we come together colors every single experience as we learn and grow together.

Have you faced any career challenges along the way and how did you overcome these?

No journey is without obstacles. I’m sure everyone at some point of their career experiences working with someone who has a style they are not used to, having to negotiate their salary after finding out they are underpaid, or being on either side of a potentially tough situation like an organization restructure. A lot of times there are no perfect solutions, but looking back across many challenges, few lessons are constant: be human first, know your data, act timely and be transparent.

What has been your biggest career achievement to date?

I started coding when I was 12, and I love everything about building products and the positive impact that technology can have on our lives. But investing in people is by far my proudest achievement—giving opportunities to people from different backgrounds to break into tech careers, coaching women how to advance past what sometimes could feel like a neverending mid-level of career, finding the superpowers in people and ways to make those shine by pairing them with the right opportunities.

So much in a career can rest in having the right exposure—someone to open just one extra door for you, to push you out of your comfort zone, to help you lean into your talents and believe in yourself. I learn a tremendous amount from people I mentor and my teams. It is the most fulfilling experience to see them shine. There is only so much one can achieve on their own but if we invest in each other, the impact is exponentially higher.

What one thing do you believe has been a major factor in you achieving success? 

Curiosity. Early on in my career I have worked in a number of different industries. I also learned about the different aspects of building products by taking on a variety of roles from software engineering to technical operations and product management. All the zig-zags in my path helped me find my passions, and also taught me what I’m not best at. And as a result, I always look at building teams like a puzzle—complementary strengths of team members being individual puzzle pieces. Diversity of thought, passion, experiences, and backgrounds is key to building the best products.

What top tips would you give to an individual who is trying to excel in their career in technology?

A career path is never as straightforward as resumes might lead one to believe.  Be true to what career ingredients matter the most to you and pursue that, without letting social pressure push you in a different direction. Whilst compensation and titles definitely have merit, don’t forget about culture, learning opportunities and the ability to make an impact. And as LinkedIn might have proved to us, we are all only a few connections apart—invest in your relationships with people along the way.

Do you believe there are still barriers for success for women working in tech, if so, how can these barriers be overcome?

When I first started programming, my mom introduced me to the only software engineer she knew for inspiration. This was in a small town in Russia in the ‘90s, so he might have been the only one. When she left the room, he told me I shouldn’t study computer science because I am a girl. The first career counselor in the academic setting I’ve ever met, also told me as much. Perhaps this doesn’t happen as often now, but succeeding in an environment where you are a minority can be hard. The best thing that ever worked for me is creating my own “board of directors.” Everyone needs a group of people who pull you up, believe in you, challenge you, and remind you of your passions and strengths to help you succeed.  This group doesn’t have to include only women, or even only people in tech, as long as they are in your corner and support you every step of the way.

What do you think companies can do to support the progression of women working in technology?

Improving the representation of women in tech should be a key priority for 2021. As we strive to see more women at the top, diversity and inclusion must be at the core of every business. There are a  number of things that companies can do to support women to progress, such as offering flexible work schedules, having great paid maternity leave programs, offering ongoing personal development training and having an executive team that’s intentional and assertive about increasing female leadership. It is also important to create accountability around equal pay and advancement opportunities  for women and overall equality in the workplace.

At Iterable, diversity and inclusion is integral to our ethos, and I’m proud to share that we have just been ranked no.6 in Girls Club’s Top 25 Companies Where Women Want to Work.

What do you think companies can do to support to progress the careers of women working in technology?

Create inclusive environments that support and inspire women and people from all backgrounds. A few examples come to mind: Women are more likely to be successful in environments that are collaborative, to speak up if there are other women in the room, to apply to jobs that don’t use biased language in job descriptions, and to get promoted in a culture that values not only outcomes but also how people worked with others to get there. Creating an inclusive workplace is not a one-time campaign or initiative; it is a fundamental value that requires intentionality and accountability all across the organization.

There are currently only 17 per cnet of women working in tech, if you could wave a magic wand, what is the one thing you would do to accelerate the pace of change for women in the industry?

In my first job out of college, I was the only woman engineer in the company. And since then, there were times where I was the only woman executive in the room. And I found that so many women who were trying to get into Product roles at the time were holding back from asking for help until there was a woman in a leadership position. It is just as important for companies to look at the percentage of historically underrepresented groups in the leadership positions as overall. When there is diversity at the leadership level, magic can happen.

What resources do you recommend for women working in tech, eg podcasts, networking events, books, conferences, websites etc?

There are many wonderful women in tech groups that specialize in specific roles within tech. But it doesn’t have to be only women’s groups. I’d recommend combining that with events that focus on particular aspects of tech—many companies host events and webinars that deep dive into topics like building for scale, conducting user research, learning API best practices, designing AI products, using data science to make product decisions—practically anything you might want to learn. Those are usually free and can be found via services like Meetup or Eventbrite, or by subscribing to newsletters from tech companies in the field of interest. Many VC firms also publish insightful podcasts where experts share their experiences and market developments. Last but not least, if you have an opportunity, invest in workshops and programs taught by practitioners. For example, I’m a Reforge alumni and found it to be a career accelerator at a time when I took on a new professional challenge. I absolutely love being a part of their workshops now as a guest speaker.


WeAreTechWomen has a back catalogue of thousands of Inspirational Woman interviews, including Professor Sue Black OBE, Debbie Forster MBE, Jacqueline de Rojas CBE, Dr Anne-Marie Imafidon MBE and many more. You can read about all our amazing women here.


Glassdoor Best Places to Work 2021

Salesforce, Google, Apple & Microsoft among the best places to work in 2021

Glassdoor Best Places to Work 2021

Salesforce, Google, Apple, Facebook and Microsoft are among the best places to work, according to Glassdoor.

Glassdoor, the worldwide leader on insights about jobs and companies, has announced the winners of its 13th annual Employees’ Choice Awards, honouring the Best Places to Work in 2021 across the UK and four other countries. Unlike other workplace awards, the Glassdoor Employees’ Choice Awards are based on the input of employees who voluntarily provide anonymous feedback by completing a company review about their job, work environment and employer over the past year.

The Glassdoor Employees’ Choice Awards highlight Best Places to Work across the UK, France, Germany the U.S. and Canada. Winners are ranked based on their overall rating achieved during the past year.

The top ten Best Places to Work in 2021 for the UK are:

  1. Salesforce (4.5 rating)
  2. Microsoft (4.4 rating)
  3. Abcam (4.4 rating)
  4. Google (4.4 rating)
  5. Softcat (4.4 rating)
  6. GTB (4.4 rating)
  7. Apple (4.3 rating)
  8. Bella Italia (4.3 rating)
  9. SAP (4.3 rating)
  10. Facebook (4.3 rating)

Speaking about the awards, Christian Sutherland-Wong, Glassdoor chief executive officer, said, "COVID-19 is in the driver’s seat and every employer has been impacted. This year’s winning employers have proven, according to employees, that even during extraordinary times, they’ll rise to the challenge to support their people.”

“A mission-driven culture, transparent leadership and career opportunities are always hallmarks of Best Places to Work winners."

"This year, we also see exceptional employers who have prioritised the health, safety and well-being of their employees."

"My congratulations go to all of this year’s outstanding Employees’ Choice Award winners.”

Glassdoor’s 50 Best Places to Work (UK) in 2021 list features winning employers across a range of industries, including technology, finance, manufacturing, pharmaceuticals, insurance, food and more. Notably, despite the COVID-19 pandemic, there are four restaurant employers on this year’s list, with three of those also appearing on last year’s list, including Bella Italia, Nando’s and wagamama. Google is one of only two employers to make the UK list every year since launch, the other being J.P. Morgan.

Nineteen employers are newcomers to the UK large list in 2021, including Sage, Majestic Wine, Just  Eat and The Body Shop. Seven employers are rejoining the list in 2021, including Sky Betting & Gaming, Arm and Waitrose & Partners.

Salesforce is the only employer to appear on all five lists - US, Canada, UK, France, Germany).

When employees submit reviews about their employer on Glassdoor, they are asked to share their opinions on some of the best reasons to work for their employer (pros), any downsides (cons) and are encouraged to provide advice to management. In addition, employees are asked to rate how satisfied they are with their employer overall, rate their CEO as well as rate key workplace attributes like career opportunities, compensation and benefits, work-life balance, senior management and culture and values. Employees are also asked whether they would recommend their employer to a friend and whether they believe their employer’s six-month business outlook is positive, negative or if they have no opinion.


WeAreTechWomen covers the latest female centric news stories from around the world, focusing on women in technology, careers and current affairs. You can find all the latest gender news here.

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Elizabeth Hatt

Inspirational Woman: Elizabeth Hatt | Director, Dell Boomi

Elizabeth Hatt Elizabeth Hatt is Director of Dell Boomi.

Dell Boomi is a leading SaaS company which provides world leading, cloud-based, end-to-end capabilities including application/data integration, API management, data quality governance, B2B network management, low-code workflow automation and application development.

Tell us a bit about yourself, background and your current role

Hailing from farming stock I had a bit of a head start on work ethic.  From farm to University, from University to world travels, from world travels to a pit-stop job in IT, from a brief foray in IT to a long-term and successful career…in IT.

I am currently celebrating a ten-year anniversary with Dell Technologies; an exceptional 10 years it has been too.  At my seven-year anniversary I had worked for seven different legal entities yet had seven years continuous service and felt entirely qualified to write a thesis on acquisitions and adjusting to change.

The first two years of those ten I spent at ChangeBASE and the last three years with Boomi. Both fed my passion for developing start-up-type companies; ChangeBASE to acquisition, Boomi to number one market share position in the UK, aided enormously by having best of breed technology and a customer-first culture.

Start-ups have featured a number of times in my career with varying degrees of success.  Why start-ups?  There is a collective we’re-in-it-together work ethic that appeals to my sensibilities.  There is so much good will and camaraderie to be had when all are fighting the same fight, an absence of politics and power-hungry jostling and a pure motivation to create an innovative and successful business. To solve customer problems but equally to identify the next wave of requirements before they hit and create new and exciting ways for our customers to exceed their goals and ambitions.

I take these values into all environments in which I work, with small teams and big, and every time they serve to support a one-team approach and an inclusive, over-achieving culture.

Did you ever sit down and plan your career?

In answering this I caveat; perhaps do as I say not as I did.

I planned my career as a lawyer during my law degree, as a psychologist during my psychology degree and almost 10 years into IT I thought that perhaps I should plan for a career in the IT industry. I stepped into the industry as a naïve graduate. I simply thought I had the attributes described in a job advert that I picked up after a gap year in South East Asia.

20 years later the IT industry has changed massively and me with it.

So, no, I really didn’t plan my current career in the early years. I do now. And if I could talk to 22-year-old me I would suggest that I listen more, seek greater understanding from those in the senior positions to which I aspired, and to create a plan as a guide, not a blueprint, that I remain open-minded to opportunities and to changing my plan accordingly.

Life can throw up wonderful opportunities that you just might miss if you stick rigidly to one plan.

Have you faced any career challenges along the way and how did you overcome these?

A lack of voice. I don’t know that I have fully overcome this one and perhaps I never will.  I am an introvert.  I get my energy from time on my own. I don’t speak loudly. I have often felt in my career that what I said wasn’t heard or valued and, yes, that has changed in more recent years and I have learnt to project my voice and insist on being heard but I will always be quiet and considered.

What has been your biggest career achievement to date?

There are many career highs that I have enjoyed. Taking Boomi, in three years, from 7th position in UK market share to the number 1 spot is definitely up there.

In terms of what I currently perceive as my biggest achievement it is the ongoing management of career and motherhood and enjoying both.

People relationships, both personal and professional, get us to our great achievements, and while I drive for the number one spot, it is those relationships that I value ahead of the achievements themselves.

In focussing on performance and values over politics and agendas I get to build great teams.

Invariably successes are built by more than one and the more we invest in building effective and productive relationships the greater the successes we will enjoy, at work and at home.

What one thing do you believe has been a major factor in you achieving success?

If we realised how rarely people think about us, we would spend a lot less time worrying about what they think of us.

I believe I started to enjoy a lot more success when I stopped considering quite so much what I thought people might think.  It was liberating and gave me a confidence in taking risk where I previously felt constrained.

An employee earlier this year said that working in my team was like being in an Enid Blyton book. In years past I would have scrutinised this comment (she intended it as a compliment; brick that she is), I would have analysed my behaviour and tried to adapt and change but I now realise that doing things the way I do gives me the best chance for achieving success because it’s unfiltered. So I embrace her Enid Blyton comment and I refuse to believe that you cannot be both considerate and strong, empathetic and make difficult decisions, kind and exceptional at driving business results. Lashings of ginger beer all round.

What top tips would you give to an individual who is trying to excel in their career in technology?

Be brave. Be real. Engage. Be gritty.

Do you believe there are still barriers for success for women working in tech, if so, how can these barriers be overcome?

The goal of gender balance has to be endemic, prolific, so ingrained in the company DNA that barriers cease to exist.

To such end I encourage every senior male executive to find the inspirational leader behind the reticence of your most competent female employees and have the courage to promote her.

We all need help in progressing our careers. If it wasn’t for Toby Gold having the insight, foresight and  selflessness to put me forward for a Top Talent program, and if it wasn’t for Tim Griffin’s intelligent and inspirational leadership, and his willingness to take the time to challenge and mentor me, I would not be in the position I am in today.

What do you think companies can do to support and progress the careers of women working in technology?

Dell does a great job of supporting Women in Tech, something I have witnessed first-hand. Our Employee Resource Group, Women in Action, provides an ecosystem of support and advice that is available to all. I have been through the week-long Women in Leadership training and came out of it with greater awareness and support for my female colleague. These are just two examples of things that I think make a significant difference to the direction of travel for companies trying to reach greater gender balance.

What resources do you recommend for women working in tech, eg Podcasts, networking events, books, conferences, websites etc?

There are many, many books that may help. I found The Chimp Paradox really helped me with my fear of presenting to large audiences.  Angela Duckworth’s Grit resonated and reinforced my views on building resilience; ‘endurance is rare’ and ‘as much as talent counts, effort counts twice’.  Understanding this is critical to paving a path for success.

Books provide good theory but in practise nothing can replace the value of a good mentor and a close-knit network of supporters and advocates. These take years to nurture so please start investing in those relationships as early as possible.

What are your thoughts on the impact of Covid-19 on women in tech?

It’s a wonderful thing that we can so easily adapt our working environment and continue to work seamlessly at home, but I have heard so many stories this year about women struggling to manage the children at home and their jobs. So often we are the primary carers when we aren’t working that with children off school many women have been under pressure to perform in what is two full time jobs.

Much respect and admiration to those coping with this.  As a mental health ambassador; if it is at all possible, I thoroughly recommend carving out some time for yourself.  Bring on the vaccinations.


WeAreTechWomen has a back catalogue of thousands of Inspirational Woman interviews, including Professor Sue Black OBE, Debbie Forster MBE, Jacqueline de Rojas CBE, Dr Anne-Marie Imafidon MBE and many more. You can read about all our amazing women here.


Emma Ash

Inspirational Woman: Emma Ash | Co-Founder, YoungPlanet

Emma Ash

Emma Ash is the co-founder of YoungPlanet, a business she runs with her husband, Jason Ash. 

YoungPlanet is an app which helps to find new homes for toys and children’s goods that would otherwise sit unused gathering dust or end up in landfill.

Tell us a bit about yourself, background and your current role

My husband Jason and I started YoungPlanet around two years ago. It’s now both of our full-time jobs. Before this, I enjoyed a career in luxury goods PR and marketing before becoming a Director at the accessories company Stella & Dot.

YoungPlanet is an app which helps to find new homes for toys and children’s goods that would otherwise sit unused gathering dust or end up in landfill. The main focus is on helping families to reduce waste and become more environmentally conscious. But it also helps parents receive high-quality things for their kids for free, which can be of huge help to many families, especially at the moment.

The app works by providing a ‘cashless’ platform based on a sharing economy model. Parents can list or request a range of different children’s items; from books and clothes to toys and baby equipment. If more than one person wants the same item, the app uses a gamification system to prioritise those who need them most or have donated more items in the past - incentivizing a circular system of giving.

We started working on the YoungPlanet app around two years ago and ran a small pilot in London last year. This year, we’ve expanded beyond the capital which has been really exciting - we now have over 35,000 users from across the UK.

Did you ever sit down and plan your career?

I had plans in my 20s but once I had children, everything was on pause for a while. However, I knew that I wanted to do something creative and fulfilling. Being a mum is the most wonderful job, but having a project or business helps you to retain your identity and be your own person. I wanted to do something different from what I did before, which was in PR and marketing. I needed my next career move to fit in with life as a mother.

Have you faced any career challenges along the way and how did you overcome these?

When I worked in Paris, it was in a very hierarchical old fashioned company. Men held all the key positions and women were in assistant roles. I remember tenaciously pushing for a bigger role with more responsibility which the company was reluctant to do but, after 2 years, they eventually upped my pay grade and role. Other assistants were shocked and it certainly upset the apple cart.

This scenario is a reminder to always have confidence in yourself and your ability - don’t be afraid to be assertive to get what you want.

What has been your biggest career achievement to date?

My biggest achievement to date has to be launching YoungPlanet - it’s something I am really proud of because I can see how we are helping to change mindsets and communities for the better!

Creating the app has been one of the most fulfilling jobs I’ve had. We’re helping families to be more environmentally conscious by making it easier for them to make sustainable choices.

What one thing do you believe has been a major factor in you achieving success?

Being tenacious. It’s important to not be defeated by failure or loss and learn from your mistakes. I’ve had points that have been really difficult but it’s about how you come back from those difficulties that define you, not the mistakes that you make. Sometimes you just need to keep going until you find a way...

What top tips would you give to an individual who is trying to excel in their career in Technology?

Back yourself! You are your greatest endorsement so champion your achievements and make sure others know about them too! A practical tip for this is to catalogue your successes as you go along - whether that’s on LinkedIn or in a notebook. Sometimes, when we experience failure or if we’re having self-doubt, it can be hard to remember what we’ve done well, which can perpetuate this cycle of imposter syndrome that we can experience. Making a note of your career highs will help you when times get tough and you can look back and remind yourself of what you’re really capable of.

Do you believe there are still barriers for success for women working in tech, if so, how can these barriers be overcome?

There are certain barriers in the industry, and there’s, without doubt, a kind of uniformity to the sector. That said though, as the sector broadens to involve more of the ‘why’ than just the ‘what’ of possibility in tech, the sector will inevitably diversify across age, gender and so forth. The more tech as a sector begins to deliver as an enabler of consumers in everyday life, the broader it will inevitably become as a sector both in and of itself.

What do you think companies can do to support and progress the careers of women working in technology?

Obviously, companies should set a good example by supporting parents through a maternity and paternity leave process and have systems in place such as offering flexible hours, that make the return to work easier for women who’ve just had a baby and so forth. If an employee is working flexible hours, they will be doing the work asked of them (and more) and should not be penalised financially either. More balanced gender representation throughout a company's hierarchy is important too, and there simply should be more women in Boardrooms in the UK. I am optimistic though - as the workplace becomes more focused on both outputs and outcomes, the siloed inputs will inevitably become less dominant.


WeAreTechWomen has a back catalogue of thousands of Inspirational Woman interviews, including Professor Sue Black OBE, Debbie Forster MBE, Jacqueline de Rojas CBE, Dr Anne-Marie Imafidon MBE and many more. You can read about all our amazing women here.


Carla Dawkins

Inspirational Woman: Carla Dawkins | Head of Free Product, Experian Consumer Services

Carla DawkinsCarla is a product leader passionate about helping teams to succeed in building quality digital products that creatively solve existing problems.

She is currently Head of Free Product at Experian Consumer Services, directing a cross functional team that accelerates the growth of the company’s digital consumer products. A large part of her role involves helping people in challenging financial situations to benefit from Experian’s services.

Carla was previously a technology consultant at Deloitte before taking up a role as senior product manager at News International, serving as product owner for household names The Times and The Sunday Times. She studied architecture at University before deciding to pursue a career in technology.

Tell us a bit about your current role

I am a Head of Product within Experian’s consumer business. My primary focus is to help people access their credit score. However, my role also involves helping those with more complex financial needs benefit from one of our subscription products, and directing the ones in the market for credit to our comparison site, where they can explore a range of credit and insurance products.

As we evolve these products, we’re looking to create greater distinction in the market and explore new, innovative ways to solve existing problems, whilst also developing solutions that can support the financial lives of the people who really need it. The launch of Experian Boost last month is an example of Experian doing this – a product that I have been heavily involved in the development of.

Did you ever sit down and plan your career?

I did – but I wasn’t actually planning for a career in technology. When I was younger, I wanted to be an architect. I remember when I was seven, I saw some blueprints for a house that one of my dad’s friends was having built in Jamaica. It’s one of those standout moments where I think I decided what I wanted to do. I was also a big fan of Lego, loved to sketch and took a keen interest in maths, so this ambition made perfect sense.

How did that evolve as grew and what led you to your current role?

I studied architecture for my degree, but on completion of my undergrad, I concluded that I didn’t want to study for another four years to get a full qualification. It became clear that a career as a practising architect would involve long hours and expensive education, as well as planning and budget constraints tempering your creative vision. That’s when I decided to explore other avenues and looked at available grad schemes.

Deloitte stood out from the pack in terms of recognisable names and that’s what I applied to do. My skills in architecture were very adaptable, so I was confident this would be a good fit for me.

Deloitte was a fantastic entry point into the world of work - a rich variety of industry, clients, services, complexity of work, smart people and an eventual springboard into some exciting things. It’s from there I went to go work client side for The Times, which was my first ‘product role’. I later worked for a company called Moonfruit where I was part of a team who were given permission to pull apart and rebuild several key elements of the business. This was an incredible experience.

After that I consulted for a few start-ups and advised on some investment panels before joining Experian.

What has been your biggest career achievement to date?

My involvement in launching Experian Boost. I am one of few people within the organisation that has been involved with Experian Boost from the start. The new service allows people to include regular payments, such as council tax bills and digital entertainment services, into their credit score. Using the service, people can increase their score by up to 66 points, without damaging it, while lenders can better manage their risk.

I actually joined Experian to specifically work on Boost and while it was a baptism of fire, it has given me an invaluable and rich introduction to the business and allowed me to work with colleagues from right across different areas of the organisation.

It’s been two years of hard work and I’m proud that we were able to launch Experian Boost in November. It’s a huge positive to end the year on. However, there’s so much more we can do with the product and I’m looking forward to playing my part in its evolution.

What one thing do you believe has been a major factor in you achieving success?

I think my ability to look beyond the norm and embrace change has helped me. Through point of exposure, and the fact product management as a profession was early in its formation, I didn’t know other careers existed beyond the traditional professions. I was keen to follow a well-trodden path and studied to be an Architect. I wouldn’t change that for the world, the skills I developed there are so transferable to what I do today. While making the decision to change track was tough, it’s also led me to where I am today.

The jobs we are doing now will inevitably change in the future. The rate of change has been further accelerated as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic and we are seeing more businesses adapting to a more digitalised world. We all have to be prepared to continually review and adapt. That shouldn’t be a scary thought, it should be an exciting thing to embrace.

What bit of advice would you give to your younger self?

An extremely cliched point but, it’s OK to fail. I think the earlier you experience examples of this, the sooner you realise it’s not as scary as it seems and there’s so much to learn from doing so. The next time it happens, which it will despite your efforts to prevent it, you’ll be even better equipped to respond quickly and appropriately.

What top tips would you give to an individual who is trying to excel in their career in technology?

Develop a broad skillset, because this will give you more options in the long run. In different organisations the ‘next step’ for people working in product varies significantly. I’ve seen career pathways bend and flex in very different directions, but that’s not unusual as product management is very multi-dimensional. To succeed you need to be able to draw upon a broad and deep set of skills, which means you can push your career towards majoring in one or many of those disciplines.

In product, here's a few examples to consider:

  • Managing a bigger patch – a wider, more varied product portfolio developed in-house or in relation with partners.
  • Taking on greater responsibility in designing the construct of product functions, working practises and talent development of teams.
  • Becoming the CEO of your product, and being responsible for the profit and loss.
  • Absorbing more go-to market responsibilities.

What are the big misconceptions that exist about a career in the tech industry?

You need to be technical. I couldn’t profess to be able to write a beautiful line of code, but I do understand conceptually how to build systems. I also fully respect the engineers in my team who have this base well covered and can speak to them in a common language where we understand each other and ensure we’re pushing towards a common goal. My role as a product person is to understand deeply the customer and coordinate a team to create an elegant solution to their problem. I think you can develop that skill from any number of backgrounds, not all of which are technical. There’s a big, valuable contribution you can make to a team which so happens to use technology to get the job done.

Do you believe there are still barriers for success for women working in tech, if so, how can these barriers be overcome?

I think there’s few women you could ask who haven’t experienced that to some degree. I would say in my case, I’ve been fortunate to not have had any major barriers to my career development. In tech, there’s an increasing representation of women in roles of all seniorities, although we’re definitely still the minority. Even more so black women like me.

Evaluating my experience across my career, I would say the most common things are the unconscious biases that sometimes creep in. Examples being people you meet directing their conversation to your male colleagues irrespective of the role you’re there to play, being heard above others which can sometimes be a challenge due to perhaps the higher pitch of your voice which might not carry so well in a sea of voices, or when your objections or reactions are referred to as ‘emotional’, which is a demeaning term and isn’t so often used in reference to male colleagues.

What do you think companies can do to support the careers of women working in technology?

Irrespective of industry, there’s a huge responsibility for companies to facilitate women (and men!) in maintaining and advancing their careers as they take time out and juggle the ongoing demands of children. I feel there’s a way to go universally, as it’s an extremely difficult one for employees and companies to navigate. At Experian though, its super encouraging to see many examples of female leaders who are doing that well.

We, of all genders, have a personal responsibility to tune into these subtleties and adapt to enable a more level playing field. It’s a topical subject and something I think is improving overtime. Training is one thing but changing behaviours is a far greater challenge. This is a societal challenge and not one which is only experienced at work.


WeAreTechWomen has a back catalogue of thousands of Inspirational Woman interviews, including Professor Sue Black OBE, Debbie Forster MBE, Jacqueline de Rojas CBE, Dr Anne-Marie Imafidon MBE and many more. You can read about all our amazing women here.


Celonis logo

Vacancy Spotlight: Senior Frontend Angular Engineer (m/f/x) | Celonis

Celonis logo

Are you ready for a new challenge? Celonis is looking for a Senior Frontend Angular Engineer in Munich, Germany!

Being a global hyper-growth leader in process mining technology, our goal at Celonis is to establish our Intelligent Business Cloud as a standard SaaS solution in any company. As Senior Frontend Engineer at Celonis, you are responsible for optimizing and implementing existing product features and winning our users through your brilliant applications. With your extensive knowledge in Angular 8, Typescript 3, HTML5 and SASS we are creating innovative data visualizations in the field of process analysis. You will further work on our in-house developed components library that is being used by multiple teams and applications. You are passionate about data visualization and developing web applications? Read on!

YOU...

  • have an above – average university degree in the area of computer science or a comparable education
  • have 5+ years of experience in Frontend Development
  • are passionate about developing user experience focused web applications
  • have experience with Angular, TypeScript/JavaScript, HTML5, CSS/CSS preprocessors
  • are a sharp-minded Web Developer with a clear way of expressing things
  • have a high level understanding of domain, product and architecture
  • can solve complex problems with limited supervision
  • are able to supervise and coach junior and mid-level colleagues
  • have very good English skills

WE...

  • see people as the fundamental pillar of our success. Therefore, we invest into the personal growth and skill development of each individual alongside with the strength finder test
  • offer attractive compensation models (best-in-class salary, stock option packages, employee referral bonus, family service, flexible working hours, etc.)
  • are visionary and one of the fastest growing Software-Unicorns in the world
  • are experts in the field of Process Mining - the new Celonis Execution Management System provides a set of instruments and applications: the EMS offerings help companies manage every facet of execution management from analytics, to strategy and planning, management, actions and automations
  • distinguish ourselves through a unique combination of innovative start-up atmosphere paired with great professionalism and self-responsible work

APPLY NOW

To find out more and apply, please contact: [email protected]


If you are a job seeker or someone looking to boost their career, then WeAreTechWomen has thousands of free career-related articles. From interview tips, CV advice to training and working from home, you can find all our career advice articles here.