#TechFT Live

Get an exclusive 20 per cent discount off the Financial Time's #TechFT Live

#TechFT Live

#TechFT Live is the Financial Times’ first technology summit, taking place virtually, alongside Europe’s leading tech festival, the TNW Conference.

Across two days and 20+ hours of exclusive FT curated content, #TechFT Live will explore new ways to harness what we have learned about digitisation amid lockdowns and provide insight on the key technology trends for the year ahead.

Alongside the FT’s expert commentators and 30+ industry-leading speakers, this summit will gather over 2,000 leading business innovators and policymakers to explore key issues including, the evolution of quantum, the ethics of AI, shifting market alliances, the sustainability of digital, and emerging global tech hotspots.

Join us at FT’s inaugural tech summit on 30 September – 1 October and get full digital access to the TNW Conference. Discover how technology is transforming business and society.

WeAreTechWomen are delighted to confirm we have 20 per cent discount to attend. To claim your discount, register below using the discount code DIGIWATC.

CLAIM YOUR DISCOUNT

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Five reasons to become a coder in your 30s

Wild Code School_remote learning, woman learning to code

The opportunities and benefits within the tech industry have long been a draw to job seekers.

Indeed, the ONS reported in 2019 that the tech industry had amongst the highest number of job vacancies, increasing salaries and attractive flexible working benefits. And as a largely digitised industry it is no surprise that it has fared relatively well in lockdown with a high proportion of employees able to work from home.

But if you ever thought coding was a young person’s game and not for you, think again. Coding attracts recruits from far outside traditional STEM-based careers and education. In fact, students from Wild Code School, a web development and coding school, are upskilling and career changing from diverse backgrounds that range from dance and textile design to chemical engineering, gaming and communications.

And it’s not just school leavers or people early in their careers – in fact it’s people in their 30s who are leading the charge.

Anna Stepanoff, CEO and Founder of Wild Code School, explains the five reasons people in their 30s are turning to coding:

  • It’s not rocket science – there is an increasing awareness that you don’t have to be a Matrix-inspired hyper-brain to work in tech, and as 30-somethings have inevitably come into contact with the digital world in their existing careers – they’re wanting to get involved and understand how it works.
  • Coding is creative – while the initial draw might be the competitive salaries, we find what keeps people interested is the realisation that coding is a highly-creative industry that allows a person to problem solve and bring their own ideas to fruition.
  • Autonomy and Flexibility – people in their 30s who no longer want to work for someone else are realising that the tech industry provides options to go freelance, to choose their own clients and the flexibility to work from where they want.
  • Being a part of what happens next – from the way we consume music and media, eat out, work from home, communicate and stay fit, the tech industry is changing the way we live, and touches all aspects of our lives. Being a part of that is exciting.
  • In-demand skills – there is a widely-discussed skills gap in the tech industry, and we work with employers to understand what they are looking for and how to ensure training is commercially relevant. They are skills sought by a diverse range of companies and will become increasingly important.

“It’s a myth that if you didn’t get into coding at school, then it’s already too late,” Anna says. “If you’ve got the creativity and the drive, then we’ve got the school to help you realise your ambition.”

During the month of August 2020, anyone curious about tech, passionate about learning or considering a new professional career can register to Wild Code Summer School. Week after week, it is offering a month-long programme dedicated to discovering the tech world.


WeAreTechWomen covers the latest female centric news stories from around the world, focusing on women in technology, careers and current affairs. You can find all the latest gender news here.

Don’t forget, you can also follow us via our social media channels for the latest up-to-date gender news. Click to follow us on Twitter, Facebook and YouTube.


female coder, coding, National Coding Week

Why National Coding Week is for the women

female coder, coding, National Coding Week

In today’s digital age, coding is becoming less of a rare skill, and more of a basic literary skill. If you think about it, without code, there is no software, and without software, there are no computers. 

But as with seemingly every STEM subject and industry, there is an underwhelming percentage of women making up the amount of coders out there. This is surprising considering the first coder in the early 20th century was a woman! Ada Lovelace, Grace Hopper and Annie Easley are just three examples of great women who knew how to code.

So why is there still such a tiresome gender gap? WeAreTechWomen spoke to five women in STEM – all at different stages of their careers – to hear their thoughts, reasonings and advice as to why coding isn’t just for the boys.

Starting at school

Sam Humphries HeadshotAs Sam Humphries, Security Strategist at Exabeam explains, “The technology industry has transformed considerably over the last few years, and with it brings the emergence of a new standard of employee: modern-day technologists who must possess creativity, innovation, and be talented technical problem solvers. Coders encompass these skills, responsible for both constructing complex solutions from scratch, and navigating any obstacles that come their way. Their unique skillset means employees with coding abilities are now integral personnel in the modern workforce.”

Being able to code is a skill that will only heighten in value. As Humphries goes on to confirm, “access to digital skills is a crucial enabler of digital transformation, fuelling increased demand for people with the skills to manage evolving technologies such as AI and cloud. However, despite digital skills becoming ever more important in today’s economy, according to the CBI, two thirds of businesses already have unfilled digital skills vacancies and 58 per cent say they’ll need significantly more digital skills in the next five years.

“National Coding Week serves as a great way to promote the importance of coding skills for our current and emerging business landscape. It also contributes a fun solution to help encourage young people, especially young women, to pursue a career in technology. Women represent a small percentage of the technology workforce, which makes looking for skills in an all-but untapped female talent pool an obvious solution. By encouraging women and girls with the possibilities of an education and career in technology, we can help address the skills shortage by introducing new perspectives and problem-solving skills to the industry.”

Building a career

Hannah AlexanderThe ability to code is a skill that is beneficial in many different organisations, and can open many different doors. Hannah Alexander, Graduate Data Scientist at Mango Solutions shares her reasons for choosing data science as her first role after university: “Data science is such a rapidly developing field that it is easy to feel at the forefront of innovation. It is applicable in a vast variety of areas, so there is always something exciting developing and to contribute towards.

“Code underpins our everyday lives, from taking the train to work to flicking through Instagram,” Alexander continues. “However, very few people understand how this works. By learning how to code, you get a better understanding of the modern world! Code can be applied to any workplace. Menial tasks can be automated, tasks can be undertaken more efficiently, and you can become a more valuable member of the workforce.

“Unfortunately, I think there is a misconception amongst the younger generation that working with code or in STEM is dull, when in reality it’s anything but. The boring office worker stereotype should be broken by showcasing the exciting opportunities these jobs can provide, such as travel, global events and the opportunity to work with people from a wide variety of backgrounds.”

Isabel HutchingsThis idea around STEM being dull for girls is something that Isabel Hutchings, Applications Engineer at Content Guru agrees with. Hutchings explains:

“As a woman working in a technical role, National Coding Week is a time for myself and probably many of my fellow female colleagues to reflect on the lack of women in the industry. It’s an issue as obvious in 2020 as it has been for many years and one that shows no signs of changing soon. Indeed, recent A-level and GCSE results showed a continued gender divide in students taking Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths (STEM) subjects. Today’s students are the foundation of tomorrow’s workforce and when it comes to encouraging girls into careers in coding and other technical job roles, the gender divide in most of these key subjects is still a telling reflection of a grass-roots issue we need to solve.

“Being an engineering graduate and now working as an applications engineer, I know first-hand how hard it can be for girls to make the decision to pursue a career in things like coding and engineering. The education system as a whole needs to do more to build not only awareness and knowledge about what coding can be as a career – but passion in the subjects more generally. Young girls are at a particularly impressionable age at school, with relatively fluid perceptions of what they want to do in the future, so it’s important to capture students’ imaginations. Unfortunately, we’re not yet getting this right. Until we expand the perception of coding in young people – particularly girls – and unlock the hidden passion in students to pursue the many opportunities this area offers, we can expect to see the same stark statistics year after year.”

Elizabeth BrownElizabeth Brown, Professional Placement Student, Data Science at Mango Solutions, is someone who is currently making this decision. Brown explains: “I chose to do a work placement with Mango because in a world where data is abundant, it is vital that we stay data driven - and data science allows us to do this. I ultimately wanted a job in coding as I really enjoy it! Coding is an important skill to learn as we are constantly surrounded by computers and what they produce, and so being able to write code is a great advantage. The idea of coding and where to start with it can be daunting sometimes and so making it easier and more comfortable for people to start learning to code would help encourage the younger generation into it."

It’s never too late to learn to code

Although encouraging the younger generation into choosing STEM at schools is a great way to help close the gender gap, you don’t have to be a teenager to be able to begin to learn to code. Essentially, learning to code is learning a new skill – something you’re never too old to do!

Svenja de Vos LeasewebSvenja de Vos, CTO at Leaseweb Global explains that, “Coding is and will remain a skill for everyone to learn, it’s not just for the male part of our population. In fact, Ada Lovelace is still remembered today as the world’s first computer programmer. When it comes to coding and programming, technical accuracy and creativity marry well together. Coders support organisations across various industries from healthcare and manufacturing to cybersecurity. With a notable rise in cyber attacks, exacerbated by the global pandemic, the latter is absolutely vital. Those able to analyse their company’s IT infrastructure for potential vulnerabilities due to their skillset, will be in high demand.”

De Vos rounds things off nicely by additionally sharing the following advice: “National Coding Week is an opportunity to shine a light on how important, and how much fun, it is to learn to code and take an interest in technology as the world around us constantly evolves. With various coding platforms and language courses available for both younger and older learners, you can start learning to code at any age.

“With the digital skills gap growing, it’s crucial that schools and universities support their students in learning to code to help widen future pools of developers."


WeAreTechWomen covers the latest female centric news stories from around the world, focusing on women in technology, careers and current affairs. You can find all the latest gender news here.

Don’t forget, you can also follow us via our social media channels for the latest up-to-date gender news. Click to follow us on Twitter, Facebook and YouTube.


School of Code Mentor

Calling all developers, the School of Code needs YOU!

School of Code Mentor

Are you passionate about tech? Do you want to get involved in helping to shape, and inspire, your region’s next generation of coders? Yes! Then School of Code need you.

School of Code are launching their free software developer bootcamp across the country on 15 November 2021 and  are looking for 192 mentors, (yes that did say 192!),  to help them make a massive impact.

They will be taking a group of people from all walks of life through their free, life-changing, intensive course and turning them into something special…Job ready junior developers.

School of Code are looking for mentors, both veteran and brand new, to volunteer 30 minutes per week, to support them as they navigate their first steps into the world of tech!

As a SoC Mentor you’ll get to share your knowledge, get the buzz of making a positive difference and it doesn’t look too shabby on your CV either.  If this would be your first time volunteering as a mentor, fear not as you will be supported every step of the way.

The November bootcamps will cover the following areas – North West, West Midlands, East Midlands, London and South East.

To get involved,  register below and start your School of Code mentoring journey today!

REGISTER HERE

Interested in applying for the School of Code bootcamp instead?


There are no prerequisites to apply and no previous experience required – those applying for the course don’t even need to have seen a line of code before.

School of Code takes a learner from beginner to software developer in just 16 weeks before helping them find their first role in tech.

Already this year, during the pandemic lockdowns, they have successfully helped 62 people go from zero to programmer and started their professional tech careers.

APPLY HERE

Back behind view photo of programmer lady look big monitor check id-address work overtime check debugging system wear specs casual shirt sit table late night office indoors, coding

National Coding Week 2021 | Bringing women into tech and closing the digital skills gap

With the swift technological changes we are experiencing today,  there has never been a better time to invest in the digital skills of both children and adults.

This National Coding Week provides the perfect opportunity to draw attention to the importance of developing coding as a skill set and to consider what more we can be doing to actively encourage the younger generation, especially young girls, to engage with coding and STEM.

Svenja de Vos, LeasewebSvenja de Vos, CTO, Leaseweb Global elaborates, “every year National Coding Week provides an opportunity for tech companies to do more to showcase the benefits of a career in software development. You’re never too young or too old to code, and it is important to widen future pools of developers in order to help close the tech skills gap.

“The world needs talented coders and software professionals now more than ever. Especially in the last year and a half, coding has become essential to daily life by allowing organizations to continue business operations in the face of the pandemic. Every single day, software developers come up with innovative apps that are helping to revolutionize a variety of industries. Dedicating a full week to promoting coding will hopefully influence many to further develop their skill”.

The digital skills gap 

One of the pressing reasons to encourage more people to widen their technical skills is the widening digital skills gap facing the UK. In fact, “less than half of UK employers believe new entrants to the workforce have the digital-skills required”, explains Ian Rawlings, Regional VP at SumTotal Systems. He continues, “this needs to change if the UK is to plug the existing skills gap and become a leader in technology. From mandatory coding teaching in schools, to initiatives such as Code First and the Institute of Coding, there are so many ways to develop digital skills early on and show candidates all the benefits that coding has to offer.

“Building and developing digital skills within the current workforce will also be key as the pandemic continues to accelerate the pace of digital transformation. This National Coding Week, with coding fluency growing in both value and necessity, lifelong learning remains integral in future-proofing the workforce and closing the skills gap”.

Simon Gould, Chief Product Officer, Totalmobile shares this sentiment, pointing out that “it’s important to reflect on how we can encourage both experienced employees and the younger generation to broaden their skillsets, simultaneously enhancing their own employability and closing the digital skills gap. It’s an area that resonates strongly given the interesting and varied career that has evolved since that first development role.

“Organisations, in particular, should consider what they can do to encourage the whole spectrum of gender, ethnicity and social demographic backgrounds. Many businesses can set examples by engaging in initiatives in schools and places of work to show a wide range of students what a career in tech could look like, such as Women Who Code, which a number of our staff are passionately involved in. Getting female developers, engineers and senior leaders to talk to young women and girls about their jobs and highlighting that tech can be exciting and engaging is hugely powerful. It’s an approach I see first-hand, with my daughter studying computer science at GCSE. That small acorn that grows into a passion”.

Bringing women into the tech world 

In spite of the concern surrounding the digital skills gap, there is much to be optimistic about for the future of tech. In particular, as Gould highlighted, there are many organisations placing a much-needed emphasis on inspiring young women to get involved in coding and other digital skills.

Debra Danielson_, Digital Guardian“Currently, only 14% of programmers and software developers in the UK are women, a daunting statistic that must change if we are to move forward as an industry”, Debra Danielson, CTO and SVP Engineering at Digital Guardian notes.

“Increased mentorship is one way forward for diversity. As a woman working in technology, I can say that, outside of my own dogged stubbornness, my opportunities have stemmed from having a single person willing to advocate for me. That helped me break through some of the lazy stereotypes about women in STEM… being perceived to be less technical, less mathematical than men. Our allies, supporters and advocates can help open the door, and we need vocal colleagues and managers willing to give women chances and support us on our journeys.

“Recognising the dearth of diversity in the industry, I’m passionate about increasing the participation and impact of both women and underrepresented communities in technology. I volunteer at many levels, from Tech Girls Rock (secondary school girls learning to code) to coaching and mentoring tech founders on how to access capital. We must create more space for women within the industry. National Coding Week is the perfect opportunity for leaders to connect with their teams and help women boost their skills and advance their careers.”

Angela Garland_Content GuruAngela Garland, Escalations Engineer at Content Guru, seconds this statement, “science has always made sense to me – I like the certainty of it – and I knew that’s what I wanted to do from an early age. I was raised in an engineering household and lucky enough to go to a school that encouraged girls to take GCSE and A-Level science – but then again, it was an all-girls school! We had plenty of female science teachers and role models supporting us. Sadly, I don’t think this is typical of the education system. By the time I reached university, our mechanical engineering bachelors was just 10% female. This has to change.

“We need to do much more to encourage young girls with a passion for science, coding and technology to study STEM courses – both at younger school ages and further on into higher education – and to pursue careers in these exciting and rewarding fields. The stark gender divide means it’s often challenging for women working as engineers – from application engineers to mechanical engineers and cybersecurity engineers, women are almost always in the minority.

“My advice to women embarking on a career in technology is to keep pushing and challenging at every opportunity. The most important thing is to push yourself outside of your comfort zone, speak up in large groups of men and put your ideas out there. Find an organisation that puts everyone – regardless of gender – on an equal playing field and pushes you into a role where you challenge yourself and those around you”.

National Coding Week is vitally important for anyone working in or around the tech scene. Not only does it open the conversation about topics such as the digital skills gap, or women in tech, but coding is such an essential skill in today’s age it is always a good idea to reiterate its importance.

Jeff KeyesJeff Keyes, VP of Product Marketing and Strategy, Plutora concludes, “Written code has become the foundation of every organisation, no matter the size, in a rapidly and constantly changing software landscape. A skilled team of coders is imperative to not only building that foundation, but also to put businesses in the best possible position to thrive. Coding has become much more than just the developer language of tech. It’s the language of business and in turn, the language of success.”


female coder, coding, National Coding Week

National Coding Week 2021 | Opening up digital skills for all

female coder, coding, National Coding Week

Monday 13th September marks the beginning of this year’s National Coding Week.

This week provides us with the perfect opportunity to reflect on the importance of digital skills and how coding can offer up a world of career opportunities for people from all backgrounds. It’s never been more important – according to latest research from World Skills UK, 76% of businesses think that a lack of digital skills will damage their bottom lines, while 88% of young people understand that they will be essential for their careers.  

But while this years’ A-Level results saw a record number of students taking up Computer Science, the subject is still far more popular with boys than girls, suggesting the technology industry has more to do to open up routes for all.  

We talked to some of the industry’s leading experts and asked them to share their thoughts:  

Firstly, coding is a valuable skill  

Kara SpragueCoding is still a highly sought-after skill in the tech industry. According to Kara Sprague, EVP and GM of BIG-IP at F5, “the influence of coding continues to disrupt and transform all industries.”  

And while new innovations will also impact how developers work in future, this will not diminish the importance of digital skills and ability to code. 

Sean FarringtonAs Sean Farrington, EVP EMEA, Pluralsight comments, “despite the rise of low and no-code application development in recent years, coding skills remain critical for businesses…”

“Even legacy languages which may be deemed out of date by many are still useful to learn.”  

James McLeod FaethmJames McLeod, VP EMEA at Faethm adds, “AI won’t ever become a direct replacement for coders – after all, we’ll still need programmers to write the very programmes that will then write code! That said, businesses should recognise where it can streamline their operations, and look to proactively transition coders and programmers into roles where human elements will be needed in the future. Coding might be changing, but through targeted skills development there’ll still be plenty of opportunities for coders in future.”  

Andrea Nagel TanzuInterestingly, the importance of digital skills goes beyond the most technical roles too. Andrea Nagel, Manager, Application Services at VMware Tanzu highlights, “There are many varied roles in tech these days that don’t require coding skills. However, gaining an exposure to coding, even at a basic or foundational level, is really useful for anyone working in software or product, even if you’re not directly coding yourself.”  

For those just starting out, Jane Saunders, Head of Model Pipeline Engineering at Secondmind advises, “My advice for anyone looking to get into coding is to just give it a go. Start with a toy problem, and then quickly move onto a personal project, giving yourself plenty of small goals along the way. Remember with coding you’re mostly talking to your future self or others who will be reading your code, rather than the computers who are executing it.”  

But there’s a talent shortage when it comes to digital skills  

Ursula MorgensternHowever, the continued demand for digital skills reflects an ongoing talent shortage in the sector too. Ursula Morgenstern, President, Global Growth Markets at Cognizant, is an advocate for tackling this, commenting, “as businesses accelerate recruitment to drive growth in the wake of the pandemic, a war for talent has arisen, with skilled individuals highly sought after but with far too few qualified personnel to fill the vacancies. You need only Google ‘software engineer’ or ‘developer’ to see thousands of roles available and unfilled in the UK. 

“This talent shortage will continue to create challenges for organisations, but also opportunities to think differently about how they manage, recruit and retain staff. Coding is the crucial baseline for many of these jobs, which should in theory broaden talent pools given its accessibility.” 

David Huntley DistributedDavid Huntley, Technical Lead at Distributed points to the rise in freelance developers who could be vital in filling this gap. “Alternatively, many developers are turning to freelance work to learn new skills, given the range of projects this working model gives them access to and the opportunity to work with other professionals in the space to cross-pollinate expertise. Another major advantage of this flexible approach to developer work is that individuals can more easily find projects that fit their current skillset, meaning they have access to well-paid work while learning on the job.” 

Could improving diversity in coding help solve the skills deficiency?  

The industry talent gap also reflects a need to open up the industry to people from diverse backgrounds too – and particularly women and young people.  

Geoff SmithGeoff Smith, CEO at emerging talent management consultancy Grayce comments, “Worryingly, figures show that just 26% of UK graduates with core STEM degrees are female. This has been a huge motivation for us to fund two women to enrol on Code Nation’s 12-week Coding Bootcamp this year in our bid to inspire more females to join the industry. It’s so important that we continue to improve diversity in tech and encouraging more people to build on their skills sets and learn to code is a huge part of this – these individuals have limitless potential to add masses of value to the UK workforce.” 

F5’s Kara Sprague also adds, “It is vital that everyone is given the opportunity to learn coding. To secure a more equitable future, we must nurture a diverse pipeline of talent that can build and excel within technology organisations. I am increasingly encouraged by how some countries have adopted requirements in their core curriculums for kids to learn coding. This bodes well for their technology sectors and job-creation abilities moving forward. Outside of formal curriculum requirements, there is also a lot of work taking place across the technology industry and non-profit sector to upskill young people, with a focus on under-represented groups.” 

Ursula MorgensternCognizant’s Ursula Morgenstern concludes, “If underserved communities are provided with the right digital and coding training from businesses, their economic mobility and wider educational opportunities in turn could significantly increase. As such, this is where businesses should be looking to invest a large proportion of their recruiting budget – looking at the long game and recognising the need and opportunity to broaden and deepen the talent pool.”  


System1Group logo featured

Vacancy Spotlight: Mid Level Developer | System1Group

System1Group logo

System1Group’s drive to discover breakthrough marketing solutions guaranteed to help their clients grow more (and waste less) has led to them being voted the “Most Innovative Agency” by clients and agencies alike for six of the past seven years:

  • System1Group have been the first to champion the predictive accuracy, cost & speed advantages of online research.
  • They’re also the first to use online’s interactive and recursive capability, to automatically capture and structure any number of open-ended consumer responses. Since 2000, System1’s MindReader has been used 50m times collecting over 100m open responses.
  • They are the first to champion the accuracy of Predictive Markets (wisdom of crowds) and validate its ability to better predict the market potential of our clients’ new product ideas. Since 2004 we have successfully assessed the market potential of over 50,000 innovations.
  • Finally, System1Group are the first to create an online measure of emotion and validate that a consumers’ feelings about a brand and its marketing are the best predictor of their market potential.

System1 is an ambitious business. Their objective is to continue to spearhead our industry’s change agenda. This innovative and entrepreneurial spirit has led to more major new global launches for this year that will change the way Marketing Leaders approach Market Research:

  • The first to launch a service that will test every single Ad that runs on Television in the UK and USA. System1 Ad Ratings will be online and subscription based and will provide predictive next day ratings for any new ad – and past 12 months advertising performance – for any brand or company. We are predicting this will become the industry standard – and a “must have” tool for every marketing leader in the world.
  • The first to launch a better, cheaper faster way for clients to test earlier, more often, more accurately than ever before. The System1 Creative Guidance System is a new Research & Strategic Guidance tool that has been specifically designed to be flexible enough to fit with any client’s existing advertising development process.

Becoming part of our team

System1 are looking for a talented and experienced person to join their IT Team as a Front-End Developer responsible for helping them build beautiful and intuitive user interfaces for use by customers and staff, showing passion, pride and commitment in your work.

  • Are you up for working in a fast-paced, Agile environment?
  • Can you be responsible for the hands-on development of great looking, intuitive web based applications using HTML5, JavaScript, and CSS all using the latest technologies?
  • Will you participate in the full system lifecycle including analysis, planning, implementation, testing, documentation, and deployment?
  • Are you passionate about implementing clean, responsive and lag-free user interfaces? Do you want to work for a company that offers huge potential, emphasizes fun and recognizes and rewards hard work.
  • At the heart of your work is designing software that looks great and performs well.
  • You will recognise as we do that great UI is key component of delivering outstanding UX to our customers?

Do you want to be part of the Revolution at System1? If so, what would you be doing..?

  • Develop and test systems within an Agile delivery approach that supports incremental development of high-quality, fully tested application component delivery every 2 weeks
  • Conduct acceptance testing, load testing, unit testing, troubleshooting, and performance tuning as required
  • Actively participate in the full system lifecycle including analysis, planning, implementation, testing, documentation, and operation
  • Participate in code reviews
  • Create and maintain software documentation
  • Integrate data from various back-end services and databases
  • Technical implementation of designs and business logic.
  • Work closely with other teams, including design and backend engineering.
  • Make on-the-fly changes to improve user flow.

You need to be this kind of person…

  • Organised and self-motivated team player
  • Clear communicator with problem-solving skills.
  • Have a keen eye for design and intuitive user experience.
  • Ability to champion new ideas and develop new approaches.
  • Excellent problem solver with an attention to detail without getting lost in it.

You need to have the following experience

  • Minimum of 3+ years as a Developer
  • C# / .net Core
  • Entity-Framework
  • MSSQL

Nice to haves

  • React, Redux, Typescript, D3, NPM Webpack
  • Scrum
  • JIRA, Wiki experience
  • Cross browser coding best practices
  • Unit Testing
  • HTML5, CSS

Location

Havant, UK.

System1Group have an established Hybrid flexible working policy. Successful candidates will have a requirement to attend the Havant office once a fortnight for team meetings and project planning and work remotely within the UK outside of this time.

APPLY HERE

Future of Work - Digital

Recommended Event: 05/10/2021: The Future of Work: Digital | FT Live

The Future of Work - Digital - FT Live

Achieving more productive, efficient and meaningful interactions through innovative workplace technologies

The evolution of working practices hinges on the availability and adoption of new technologies. As a result of the pandemic, many organisations have fast-tracked their plans, adapting quickly to implement new technologies that can ensure effective communication and collaboration in a crisis.

But as the ‘new normal’ becomes ‘normal’, digital strategy needs to be iterated to keep up with the fast pace of technological change. The need for new investment and innovation must be balanced with equally pressing financial concerns, all the while maintaining business continuity through the uncertainty. Technology leaders, and their teams, will continue to be instrumental in reshaping the new world of work.

Key themes include:

  • Omnichannel Workplace – What does the next generation ‘Omnichannel workplace’ look like?
  • Privacy and Security – Addressing the associated privacy and security concerns of increasingly dispersed workforces.
  • Virtual Reality – How is VR being applied in the workplace to create more personalised and meaningful interactions?

WeAreTechWomen are delighted to confirm we have 20 per cent discount to attend. To claim your discount, register below using the discount code WATCVIP.

BOOK YOUR TICKET

Women Developer Academy

Apply for the Women Developer Academy Europe & become a leader in the technology industry!

Women Developer Academy

Google’s Women Developer Academy is currently accepting applications – could you become a leader in the technology industry?

The free 4-week-long program will equip women software engineers and developers across Europe with the skills, resources and support they need to become leaders in the industry through public speaking and other community contributions.

If you are a professional IT practitioner (e.g. software engineer, data scientist, developer, etc.), bringing skills in one of the many Google technologies, looking to land more speaking opportunities, improve your public speaking skills and build your confidence and network, this month-long programme is for you.

You’ll have weekly workshops focussing on specific topics from public speaking to community contributions and have access to weekly 1:1 mentor sessions facilitated by Googlers and technical experts within our European developer community.

Beyond gaining new skills, you will also get to meet, connect, and network with other women developers who are on a similar journey and support you to find speaking opportunities through Women Developer Academy’s developer community network to showcase your newly developed presentations.

They also encourage a big interest in our Google Developer Experts program and support you on the way to become one after the Academy.

Let’s work together to bring diversity to the stage, because impact does not end there, that’s where it starts!

Women Developer Academy

Who are Women Developer Academy looking for?

  • Knowledge, passion and experience in one of the following technologies: Android, Google Cloud, Tensorflow, Machine Learning, Flutter, Firebase, Kotlin, Go, Web Technologies, Google Workspace and the goal to become a Google Developer Expert in the future.
  • Little public speaking experience.
  • Motivated to be active and vocal in the developer community and keen to participate as a speaker in developer conferences and meetups.
  • Available throughout October to attend all workshop and mentoring sessions (virtually) as well as commit to the programme requirements.
  • Based in any of the European countries.

FIND OUT MORE & APPLY

Applications for the Women Developer Academy close on 19 September 2021

TechWomen100 2021 logo

TechWomen100

Nominations are now open

The TechWomen100 awards are the first of their kind to focus solely on the female tech talent pipeline and recognise the impact of champions, companies and networks that are leading the way. Nominations are now open until 10 September 2021.

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WeAreTechWomen launch partnership with Speakers for Schools to inspire the next generation of technologists

Speakers for Schools & WeAreTechWomen Partnership-1

WeAreTechWomen are proud to announce a partnership with Speakers for Schools to inspire the next generation of technologists.

Speakers for Schools help young people access the top opportunities through free inspiring school talks and eye-opening onsite and virtual work experience.

As part of this partnership, WeAreTechWomen and Speakers for Schools will be hosting an event – “What does working in Technology look like?” – on 02 November.

The event will bring together an amazing array of WeAreTechWomen’s award’s community with girls and young women, to help encourage them into STEM and technology careers.

The super-talented technologists, from across gaming, special effects, climate change, cybersecurity, web design, artificial intelligence, engineering, space technology and more, will share their career stories and advice.

During the event, there will be the opportunity to pose questions to our experts and to find out what a career in technology really looks like.

Vanessa Vallely OBESpeaking about the partnership, Vanessa Vallely, Managing Director, WeAreTheCity & WeAreTechWomen, said, “WeAreTechWomen are delighted to be partnering with Speakers for Schools to encourage more young people to consider careers in technology.”

“Our children’s tech conference will showcase the career stories of ten of our previous TechWomen100 Award winners and enable over 200 children to find out what it is really like to work in technology.”

“I am exceptionally proud to be partnering with Speakers for Schools and to be able to provide a platform for our award-winning role models to pay it forward and  inspire the next generation of technologists.”

Jason ElsomJason Elsom, Chief Executive Officer, Speakers for Schools added, “We are delighted to partner with WeAreTechWomen on this brilliant event.”

“In a world that is increasingly digitalised, there are a growing number of exciting job opportunities in the technology sector, but as they are less traditional by nature, young people can be less familiar with the career paths available.”

“Partnerships like this ensure we connect young women to careers in dynamic industries, no matter what background or circumstance.”

“This event is a fantastic opportunity to encourage young people into the industry.”

Discover more about Speakers for Schools below

Have you ever wondered how apps are made or how social media platforms are built? Have you ever seen computer generated images in movies and wondered how they did that?

Have you ever played a game online and questioned how those images were made or wondered how websites are built? The answer is technology – something we all use every hour of every day!

From buying tube tickets, to buying clothes online, Googling, making calls or sending messages. There are millions of technologists all over the world, in thousands of different jobs, who bring this technology to life. These individuals not only enable us to enjoy life through the use of technology,but they also build tech and systems that save lives and help solve big societal issues, like poverty and climate change.

Join Speakers for Schools and WeAreTechWomen as we take you on an incredible journey, where you will hear career stories from a group of super-talented technologists in gaming, special effects, climate change, cyber security, web design, artificial intelligence, robotics, engineering and space technology. The day will run from 10.30am-2pm on 2nd November. During this event there will be the opportunity to pose questions to our experts and to find out what a career in technology really looks like. What are you waiting for?

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