women in computing, teacher, STEM featured

Proportion of women studying Computing rises to 13.3 per cent

women in computing, teacher, STEM

The proportion of women studying Computing A-Levels has risen to 13.3 per cent, according the new research.

The study, conducted by Ensono, found that although the number of women taking Computing has doubled since 2013, it remains unequal. In 2019, 9,649 males took Computing A-Levels, while only 1,475 females did.

The research also found that there has been a five-year increase in students taking STEM subjects. STEM subjects include Biology, Chemistry, Computing, Further Maths, Maths and Physics.

Further to this, there has been a five-year decrease in arts subjects of 20 per cent. Art subjects include English, Drama, Art & Design, Media/Film/TV studies and Religious Studies.

Speaking about the research, Oliver Presland, Vice President of Global Product Management at Ensono said, "More students than ever are achieving STEM A-Levels, with a nine per cent uptick in these subjects over five years."

"Computing has been no exception and it’s especially encouraging to see the proportion of women taking the subject has doubled since 2013."

"However, it’s worth pointing out that in Computing, the gender balance is still highly skewed towards men, with 9,649 and 1,475 entries for males and females respectively."

"More will still need to be done in this regard to encourage women into the space."

"With the UK in the midst of a digital skills gap, increased uptake of Computing A-level represents positive news for the industry."

"Lack of appropriate skills currently presents a major hurdle to business growth and innovation, and has hindered the UK’s competitiveness."

"As the Fourth Industrial Revolution ushers in far-reaching economic and societal changes, the world of work is evolving with new roles demanding new, digital capabilities."

"Youngsters need to be able to flourish in this dramatically different environment, and students today seem to be acknowledging those changes in the subjects they’re choosing.”


Caroline Criado Perez featured

WeAreTechWomen Conference Speaker Spotlight: Caroline Criado Perez OBE

Caroline Criado Perez

WeAreTechWomen speaks to Caroline Criado Perez OBE, Writer, Broadcaster and award winning feminist campaigner, Author of Invisible Women: Exposing Data Bias in a World Designed for Men, about her career.

Caroline is also one of the keynote speakers at our upcoming WeAreTechWomen: The Future World of Work conference on 22 November. Caroline will be discussing how, in a world largely built for and by men, women are systematically ignored.

Caroline is a writer, broadcaster and award-winning feminist campaigner. She is published across the major national media, and appears in both print and broadcast as a commentator on a wide range of topics.

Her first book, Do it Like a Woman, was published by Portobello in 2015. It was described as “a must-read” by the Sunday Independent and “rousing and immensely readable” by Good Housekeeping who selected it as their “best non-fiction”.Eleanor Marx hailed it in the New Statesman as “an extended and immersive piece of investigative journalism.” Her second book, INVISIBLE WOMEN: exposing data bias in a world designed for men, is published in March 2019 by Chatto in the UK & Abrams in the US.

Caroline has a degree in English language and literature from the University of Oxford, and studied behavioural and feminist economics at the LSE. She was the 2013 recipient of the Liberty Human Rights Campaigner of the Year award, and was named OBE in the Queen’s Birthday Honours 2015.

At the conference, Caroline will expose data bias in a world designed for men. She will be discussing how, in a world largely built for and by men, women are systematically ignored.

WeAreTechWomen, the Technology arm of WeAreTheCity, is hosting its fourth full-day conference in London, aimed at over 400 women who are wanting to broaden their technology horizons, learn new skills and build their tech networks.

Our unique conference will include the opportunity for our delegates to learn about a variety of technical topics and get involved in Q&A’s, hands-on activities and interactive workshops. Our aim is to provide an environment where our delegates can upskill and grow their skills/networks for the future.

Can you tell us a little about your background? Where you’ve come from, where you’ve worked, how you got to where you are today?

I took my time figuring out who I was and what I wanted to do. I didn’t go to university till I was 25. It was there, in my second year, that I read a book called Feminism and Linguistic Theory – and everything changed. I had always dismissed feminism and feminists, preferring to see myself as “one of the guys.” But this book made me realise that one of the things I had always dismissed (that so-called generic male words like “he” to mean “he or she” or “man” to mean “humankind” were in fact not generic at all) was absolutely correct. Because it made me realise that I was in fact picturing a man whenever I heard those words. And that completely transformed my world view, in no small part because I was just so shocked that I had been picturing men for 26 years and had never noticed. It made me evangelical about making everyone else see this bias too. And that is what pretty much everything I’ve done since has been about.

Did you ever sit down and plan your career?

Absolutely not! I meandered to where I am today.

What inspired you to get involved with in motivational speaking?

I’m not sure I particularly see myself as a motivational speaker! I am passionate about changing people’s minds about feminism and speaking is one of the ways I try to do that.

Do you have a favourite experience from your career?

When the Scottish government announced that they were setting up a working group on collecting sex and gender disaggregated data in large part because of my book. That was incredible.

What do you think WeAreTechWomen guests will gain from your talk?

They will understand why it’s so important to collect sex-disaggregated data!

What are your top three tips for success?

Do what you’re passionate about.

Don’t worry about people thinking you’re not “nice”: if you’re a woman trying to change things, a lot of people won’t like you.

Get a dog.

What has been your biggest challenge during your career?

All the hate that accompanies any woman with a public profile

Which female role models are you most inspired by?

All the women who fought for our right to vote. They were so gutsy and fierce, and more radical than we can ever imagine being. The sheer effrontery of demanding the vote in the 1800s! I don’t think we can understand how outrageous a demand that was. But they fought all their lives for it against seemingly insurmountable odds – and they won. That gives me hope when I feel hopeless.

In your opinion, what is the biggest obstacle for women at work and how can it be overcome?

Women do 75 per cent of the world’s unpaid carework and it has a massively negative impact on their health and their careers. It can be be overcome by governments collecting data on this work (without which everything would fall apart) and creating policy to support it, including policy that encourages men to do their fair share.

If you could change one thing to accelerate the pace of change for Gender Parity, what would it be?

Free universal childcare.

What piece of advice would you give to your younger self?

If boys think you’re too loud they are the problem, not you.


SECURE YOUR SEAT

WeAreTechWomen logo featured


online-bullying-cyber-bullying

Protecting minors online: navigating technology for age-restricted industries

online-bullying-cyber-bullying

Article provided by Mira Pancholi, Business Development Manager, Jumio

The saying “old before one’s time” has never been so applicable in today’s digital society.

With easy access to technology, young children now have the ability to engage with individuals from across the world. For this reason, it has never been more important that websites and social media platforms develop airtight age verification processes that protect minors from products and services intended for adults.

Over the last few years, there have been many reports of minors gaining access to social media platforms, gaming and gambling websites, and even sites selling e-cigarettes and vaping equipment without proper measures in place to accurately verify their age. For example, a report from The Gambling Commission at the end of last year found that 450,000 children aged 11 to 16 regularly place bets.

Online, it is naturally harder to determine the age of a user. It is only with the right technology that businesses can protect themselves, and most importantly their users, with thorough yet painless age verification checks and authentication processes. Ultimately, it’s important to ensure a user is old enough to be using the product or solution in the first place, but also verify that they are who they say they are on an ongoing basis to help protect against account takeovers.

Combatting the growing risk to minors online

The temptation would be for businesses to employ very limited measures to confirm a user’s age. For example, pop-up windows that simply ask a user if they are over the age of 18, and websites asking for birth dates to be manually entered. These pose obvious issues, with minors simply providing false dates and pretending to be older than they are.

With a recent study revealing that one in four children under the age of six has a smartphone, and nearly half spend up to 21 hours per week on devices, this rise in online access has increased the demand for age verification (particularly as we have seen huge numbers of underage users being granted access without having to verify their age through adequate checks). These checks include the physical inspection of ID documents, visual checks (i.e. is the customer visually and clearly over the age of 18), a valid credit card transaction, age confirmation using third-party agencies, and a document process combined with customer access to controlled checks.

However, companies are now more than ever being held accountable. Last month, The Gambling Commission’s new rules came into force to ensure operators verify customers’ age and identity details faster. Jeremy Wright, the UK’s Secretary of State for Digital, Media, Culture and Sport said, “online tech firms must do more to protect children” in response to a shocking investigation into the number of children accessing dating sites.

So how can businesses ensure their age verification checks are suitable?

Seek out weaknesses

First, we should consider why the technology that is currently being used has its weaknesses. Previously, too many companies have chosen half-baked solutions to safeguard children online at a minimal cost, and these solutions have a number of inherent limitations.

In order to verify an age, reliance on the customer’s own self-report or government-issued identity documentation is not always reliable. While the latter may seem more so, an ID document, such as a driving license or passport, easily may well be one that is fraudulent.

Some are even in the school of thought that making age verification mandatory could amount to setting businesses up to fail at age verification, as regulations divert attention and resources away from other education and safeguarding efforts and put more pressure on users to falsify their verification.

Take advantage of technology users’ habits to increase security

One way to encourage the reliable use of age verification technology is to tailor it towards the habits of the user — in this case, teens and children.

This is where biometric-based authentication, through the use of selfie technology, can benefit an organisation for security as well as the user experience. The simple act of requiring a selfie will deter many minors from using a fraudulent ID alone. But for those that are of age, the user will naturally understand the technology thanks to Apple and Samsung who use face-based recognition to unlock their phones. Most importantly, the user will not be able to use his or her siblings or parent’s ID, or escape verification altogether.

Liveness detection is an important part of this technology. At enrollment, the selfie is compared to the picture on the user’s government-issued ID uploaded via the smartphone or computer’s camera. Then, it is ensured the ID document is authentic and that the selfie matches the picture on the ID. A 3D face map is created from a live selfie during the account setup and contains 100 times more data points than a simple 2D photo and enables online organisations, to more accurately recognise the correct user’s face while concurrently verifying their human liveness.

Minimum age requirements and potential fraudulent activity can then be checked through fraud detection analytics to help minimise risk, and accounts or purchases can then be approved or denied by the business or organisation.

Ongoing, new 3D face maps can be captured and automatically compared against the original face map created, to continue to authenticate the user. Unfortunately, on the dark web fraudsters can purchase usernames and passwords to takeover accounts by impersonating the original user. Authenticating customers for purchases means that businesses are now ensuring the buyer is in fact the account owner for repeat custom through the use of the 3D face map created when the buyer first created their online account. This is highly beneficial for industries such as vaping and e-cigarette dispensaries selling their products online, as it not only ensures identity proofing (i.e., the person making the purchase online is the original account owner)  but also verifies age.

This approach stamps out simple tick box exercises and fraudulent activity by delivering a significantly more reliable authentication experience. Now, if we enhance this with more education, parental supervision and regulation that enables, rather than penalises, diligent companies, we are on to a winning combination.

Ultimately, enabling young people to enjoy the many advantages that technology has to offer should align with the top priority of keeping users safe in a new and increasingly accessible online world.

Mira PancholiAbout the author

As EMEA Business Development Manager for Jumio, Mira is responsible for consulting on digital fraud prevention, customer acquisition and digital innovation. Mira is uniquely skilled to help infuse KYC and identity verification best practices for corporate processes and software, understanding the nuances of compliance, legal and technological considerations. Mira's strength is her diversity as a CIPD-accredited law graduate with experience in leading projects and developing solutions through IT channels ranging from e-discovery to cybersecurity. Having helped many organisations through the complex regulatory compliance landscape and staying competitive, she has served as a true advocate for compliance software.


Deloitte & Institute of Coding survey featured

Could you help Deloitte understand what motivates people to take up (or not) digital careers? Take the survey here

Deloitte & IoC survey

As part of their work with the Institute of Coding, Deloitte is undertaking some research to help understand what motivates people to take up (or not!) digital careers.

The first phase of the research is a short online survey which will take no more than 15 minutes of your time to complete. The survey is anonymous and requires no personal or company information to be shared.

The survey is looking for a variety of genders, ethnicities and ages to participate, as well as both those working in digital and those that do not.

The closing date for the survey is 14 August 2019.

By completing the survey, you will help to shape the diversity campaign for the IoC.

TAKE THE SURVEY

Deloitte & Institute of Coding


TechWomen100 2019 featured

Nominations are now open for the 2019 TechWomen100 Awards

TechWomen100 2019

WeAreTechWomen is proud to announce that the TechWomen100 Awards are now open for nominations.

It is no secret that the technology industry lacks female representation at all levels. Women make up just 19 per cent of the industry. There are some fantastic awards for women working in tech, however, most of these focus on senior women.

Whilst we feel it is extremely necessary to highlight senior and influential women, we also believe the pipeline of female technologists need a platform to shine.

This is why the TechWomen100 Awards were created. Our awards focus solely on women working in tech below director level. We hope that by highlighting the accolades of up-and-coming inspirational female tech talent, we can help to create a new generation of female role models for the industry, and a pipeline of future leaders.

Through the awards, we would also like to recognise a number of senior individuals who are championing up-and-coming women, as well as any organisations that have designed and implemented successful initiatives and programmes in order to attract, retain and develop the female tech talent.

Finally, we applaud the often-voluntary efforts of the women in tech networks that operate across the UK, and again would like to formerly recognise these within our awards.

The TechWomen100 awards are the first of their kind to focus solely on the female tech talent pipeline and recognise the impact of champions, companies and networks that are leading the way.

The 2019 awards are kindly powered by J.P. Morgan, and supported by Accenture, BAE Systems, Barclays, Credit Suisse, Lloyds Banking Group, Oliver Wyman and Worldpay.

NOMINATE NOW

Nominations

Nominations will close after a seven-week period on 20 September.

A shortlist of 200 women from a range of technology disciplines will be chosen in October by an esteemed panel of judges. There will also be a shortlist of three champions, companies and networks.

The shortlist will then be published in November where we will also open the TechWomen100 individual category for public votes of support.

All winners will be announced in December and celebrated at our prestigious award's ceremony in January. There will be 100 winners of the TechWomen100, a Champion of the Year, a Company of the Year and a Network of the Year.

Who should nominate?

  • Self-nominations are encouraged
  • Organisations looking to recognise their emerging talent pool
  • Organisation wishing to obtain recognition for their initiatives
  • Individuals who would like to recognise their efforts of their champions/role models
  • Individuals/colleagues/friends/clients/mentors/sponsors of the nominee

Awards timeline

  • Nominations open – 01 August 2019
  • Nominations close – 20 September 2019
  • Shortlist announced & public vote opens – 18 November 2019
  • Voting closes – 29 November 2019
  • Winners announced – 10 December 2019
  • Winner's celebration event – January 2020

NOMINATE NOW


Sponsored by

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TechWomen100 2019 featured

One week to go until nominations open | TechWomen100 Awards 2019

TechWomen100 2019

Just one week to go until nominations open for the TechWomen100 Awards 2019.

It is no secret that the technology industry lacks female representation at all levels. Women make up just 19 per cent of the industry. There are some fantastic awards for women working in tech, however, most of these focus on senior women.

Whilst we feel it is extremely necessary to highlight senior and influential women, we also believe the pipeline of female technologists need a platform to shine.

This is why the TechWomen100 Awards were created. Our awards focus solely on women working in tech below director level. We hope that by highlighting the accolades of up-and-coming inspirational female tech talent, we can help to create a new generation of female role models for the industry, and a pipeline of future leaders.

Through the awards, we would also like to recognise a number of senior individuals who are championing up-and-coming women, as well as any organisations that have designed and implemented successful initiatives and programmes in order to attract, retain and develop the female tech talent.

Finally, we applaud the often-voluntary efforts of the women in tech networks that operate across the UK, and again would like to formerly recognise these within our awards.

The TechWomen100 awards are the first of their kind to focus solely on the female tech talent pipeline and recognise the impact of champions, companies and networks that are leading the way.

The 2019 awards are kindly powered by J.P. Morgan, and supported by Accenture, BAE Systems, Barclays, Credit Suisse, Lloyds Banking Group, Oliver Wyman and Worldpay.

Nominations

Nominations open online on 1st August via WeAreTechWomen. Nominations will close after a seven-week period on 20 September.

A shortlist of 200 women from a range of technology disciplines will be chosen in October by an esteemed panel of judges. There will also be a shortlist of three champions, companies and networks.

The shortlist will then be published in November where we will also open the TechWomen100 and Network of the Year for public votes of support.

Winners will be announced in December and celebrated at our prestigious award's ceremony in January. There will be 100 winners of the TechWomen100, a Champion of the Year, a Company of the Year and a Network of the Year.

All winners will be invited to celebrate their awards at a prestigious reception in January 2020.

Who should nominate?

  • Self-nominations are encouraged
  • Organisations looking to recognise their emerging talent pool
  • Organisation wishing to obtain recognition for their initiatives
  • Individuals who would like to recognise their efforts of their champions/role models
  • Individuals/colleagues/friends/clients/mentors/sponsors of the nominee

Awards timeline

  • Nominations open – 01 August 2019
  • Nominations close – 20 September 2019
  • Shortlist announced & public vote opens – 18 November 2019
  • Voting closes – 29 November 2019
  • Winners announced – 10th December 2019
  • Winner's celebration event – January 2020

SPONSORED BY

TechWomen100 Awards sponsor bubble


TechWomen100 2019 featured

Two weeks to go until nominations open | TechWomen100 Awards 2019

TechWomen100 2019

Two weeks to go until nominations open for the TechWomen100 Awards 2019.

It is no secret that the technology industry lacks female representation at all levels. Women make up just 19 per cent of the industry. There are some fantastic awards for women working in tech, however, most of these focus on senior women.

Whilst we feel it is extremely necessary to highlight senior and influential women, we also believe the pipeline of female technologists need a platform to shine.

This is why the TechWomen100 Awards were created. Our awards focus solely on women working in tech below director level. We hope that by highlighting the accolades of up-and-coming inspirational female tech talent, we can help to create a new generation of female role models for the industry, and a pipeline of future leaders.

Through the awards, we would also like to recognise a number of senior individuals who are championing up-and-coming women, as well as any organisations that have designed and implemented successful initiatives and programmes in order to attract, retain and develop the female tech talent.

Finally, we applaud the often-voluntary efforts of the women in tech networks that operate across the UK, and again would like to formerly recognise these within our awards.

The TechWomen100 awards are the first of their kind to focus solely on the female tech talent pipeline and recognise the impact of champions, companies and networks that are leading the way.

The 2019 awards are kindly powered by J.P. Morgan, and supported by Accenture, BAE Systems, Barclays, Credit Suisse, Lloyds Banking Group, Oliver Wyman and Worldpay.

Nominations

Nominations open online on 1st August via WeAreTechWomen. Nominations will close after a seven-week period on 20 September.

A shortlist of 200 women from a range of technology disciplines will be chosen in October by an esteemed panel of judges. There will also be a shortlist of three champions, companies and networks.

The shortlist will then be published in November where we will also open the TechWomen100 and Network of the Year for public votes of support.

Winners will be announced in December and celebrated at our prestigious award's ceremony in January. There will be 100 winners of the TechWomen100, a Champion of the Year, a Company of the Year and a Network of the Year.

All winners will be invited to celebrate their awards at a prestigious reception in January 2020.

Who should nominate?

  • Self-nominations are encouraged
  • Organisations looking to recognise their emerging talent pool
  • Organisation wishing to obtain recognition for their initiatives
  • Individuals who would like to recognise their efforts of their champions/role models
  • Individuals/colleagues/friends/clients/mentors/sponsors of the nominee

Awards timeline

  • Nominations open – 01 August 2019
  • Nominations close – 20 September 2019
  • Shortlist announced & public vote opens – 18 November 2019
  • Voting closes – 29 November 2019
  • Winners announced – 10th December 2019
  • Winner's celebration event – January 2020

SPONSORED BY

TechWomen100 Awards sponsor bubble


Sky Women in Tech Scholars Group featured

Sky awards £125,000 to five new Women in Technology Scholars

Sky Women in Tech Scholars Group shot[1]

Sky has announced its second cohort of Women in Technology Scholars, awarding five talented women a total of £125,000 to accelerate a business idea which harnesses technology innovation.

The winners are a diverse mix of ages and industry experience however, they share a desire to use technology to bring about positive change. The five Scholars will focus on: improving children’s cultural experiences; helping the elderly stay independent; interactive television; advancing agriculture and educating young people on mental health.

From hundreds of applications, ten high quality candidates were shortlisted, before the impressive final five were selected by a panel that included Tech Talent Charter CEO, Debbie Forster MBE, who said, “It’s been fantastic to help select such a brilliant group of women with ideas that can help shape the future of tech."

"It’s vital that organisations like Sky take action like this to deliver greater diversity in the UK Tech workforce and better reflect the make-up of the population.”

At present, just 22 per cent of the UK core STEM employment is female*. As a leading UK technology organisation serving 23.7 million customers, Sky wants to attract and attain women of all ages and levels to our technology teams and to help achieve this we have introduced a range of programmes, including our Get Into Tech coding course and our Sky Software Academy and Apprenticeships.

New research shows that nearly half of boys are advised to consider a career in tech – compared to only one in five girls. And by 18-years-old 48 per cent of girls have already discounted a career in technology completely.

Sky’s Group Chief Information Security Officer, Elaine Bucknor, said, “I was blown away with the ingenuity of the projects presented and the calibre of talent and creativity."

"It’s widely acknowledged that attracting women into technology is a challenge, so we have a responsibility to bring about change."

"Boys are more than twice as likely to be encouraged to work in tech, so it’s little wonder that half the girls we spoke to had ruled out working in the industry by the time they reached 18-years-old."

"Our Women in Technology Scholars programme enables us to nurture new talent and highlight inspiring role models to encourage others to follow.”

Sky’s Women in Technology Scholars for 2019 are:

  • Olga Kravchenko (24, Ukrainian): Olga’s VR App Musemio transforms the way children experience culture by using engaging VR elements to educate. She now plans to develop the App so that parents and families can track how their children are learning, whilst also continuing to help cultural institutions improve how they interact with younger digital generations.
  • Colleen Wong (43, British/Canadian): With no technical experience Colleen left her job in investment banking to start the successful My Gator Watch. Now, the inspirational mother of two plans to evolve the product from a tracker for kids, to a wearable mobile device for seniors that can track location and detect falls, to help the elderly maintain independence.
  • Rebecca Saw (23, British): Rebecca is looking to create never-before seen interactive story-telling that will mix linear television and gaming to provide viewers with a dynamic blended reality.  She recently worked on Traitor, at VR-live theatre thriller that premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival.
  •  Mary Murphy (20, Irish): Our youngest Scholar, Mary, alongside her twin sister was a CEO at 16 years old after designing and manufacturing the Sheep Marking Gun to help on her family farm. She will continue to engineer agritech products and develop a new software-based product that could prevent sheep theft
  • Rachel Clancy (27, Irish): Rachel is looking to develop a game she has made called ‘Get Closer’, where players open dialogue with a forest creature who needs their help. The game teaches young people how to talk about emotions and support themselves and others through mental health issues.

Sky’s Women in Technology Scholars will receive financial investment and have access to an expert network of mentors and leading industry executives to accelerate their innovation. Following the success of previous years, Sky has increased the number of scholars on the scheme from three to five, emphasising its position that female potential must be supported for the successful and inclusive future of the technology industry.


Love Oyeniran

TechWomen100: What happened next for Love Oyeniran

Love OyeniranIn this ongoing series, we speak to our winners about life after winning a TechWomen100 Award.

Now in their third year, the TechWomen100 Awards recognise and celebrate the achievements of women in tech – the emerging tech talent and role models for the future.

We spoke with Love Oyeniran, who won a TechWomen100 Award in 2018.

In an era of digital disruption, Love drives change; championing transformation and re-invention of user journeys within various business streams. She works in a consultative manner with businesses on issues of strategy, organisational efficiency and technology and is experienced in delivering change in complex, global Business and IT programmes.
Love was recently awarded the Tech100 award, and nominated for WATC Rising Star 2019, for her contributions to two industry pioneering automation and digital transformation projects that were mentioned in the Financial Times and Wall Street Journal. Love is passionate about ensuring a greater representation of young minority females, in her industry and has looked to address the shortfall by providing structured mentorship and work experience, for those who did not study a STEM subject and want to work in Tech.
As a board trustee, Love has coupled her technical, change and organisational management skills to support a UK charity to advance its vision and achieve good governance.

How did you feel when it was announced that you’d won a TechWomen100 award?

Firstly I was shocked to even be nominated; so to find out that I had won I was over the moon. I was very grateful for the recognition and aside I was further encouraged to find more was to creatively promote other women in Tech.

Please tell us what has happened in your career since winning the TechWomen100 award?

Since winning the award I have been approached to a speak at the DX summit centred around digital transformation. It is a great opportunity to share the stage with people at the forefront of the Tech industry.  Along with the organisers I will be providing a number of tickets to my wider network, in hopes this will provide insights to different emerging technologies including RPA/AI, IoT, Blockchain and Smart Homes to young women in various stages of their Tech career.

After the TechWomen100 award, I was nominated as a WATC ‘Rising Star’ in the technology category. I am excited by the opportunity to get to know the other nominees and expand my network.

What advice would you give to someone else going through the award’s process?

It’s a great opportunity to let people know what you’ve been up to, so don’t be shy! I was taken back by how much support was shown by, friends, colleagues and wider network.

What tips would you give to our other members to enhance their careers?

I find it really interesting how the landscape is always changing, and gaining the understanding of this is an interesting way to enhance ones career. I would suggest members exploring their wider industry; for example you may have thought to work in a traditional bank, but you may be pleasantly surprised to understand how Fintechs challenging the status quo. Wherever you find yourself, try to understand the shortcoming and the successes of both the firm and your team and assess the ways you can add value.

Ministry of Defence featured

Ministry of Defence appoints first female Chief Scientific Adviser

Ministry of Defence

The Ministry of Defence has appointed its first female Chief Scientific Adviser, Professor Dame Angela McLean.

McLean will be the first female to hold the role and joins the Department as a distinguished academic with a commitment to science-driven policy. The MOD’s Chief Scientific Adviser (CSA) oversees the Department’s core research programme, leads technology strategy, and works closely with the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl) to develop battle-winning capabilities.

Recent CSA-funded successes include the launch of pioneering space technology, improved body armour for our personnel, and a life-saving test for sepsis.

Professor McLean is currently a Senior Research Fellow in Theoretical Life Science at All Souls College in Oxford University and has previously held a number of other academic appointments, including as a Research Fellow at the Institut Pasteur in Paris.

Defence Secretary Penny Mordaunt made the announcement on International Women in Engineering Day.

Speaking about the announcement, Mourdant said, "The Chief Scientific Adviser plays a key role in ensuring that our armed forces stay at the cutting edge of technology and innovation."

"It's poignant that we appoint Professor McLean as our first female Chief Scientific Adviser on International Women in Engineering Day, where we look to increase female participation in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics."

"As a highly respected scientist, Professor McLean is a role model to all those wanting to pursue a career in this area, and will bring extensive knowledge and expertise to the role."

Speaking of her appointment, McLean added, "This is an exciting time to be joining the Ministry of Defence, with so much important research going on to keep our armed forces at the forefront of innovation and technology."

"Britain's military has a distinguished record in developing and using science and I plan to make sure that we continue to build on that tradition."

"I hope to use my skills and experience from the range of issues I've worked on to continue our world-leading reputation in science and technology."