Women in Tech, BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT

BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT publish new practical guide to increasing gender diversity and inclusion

BCS Women

BCS, The Chartered Institute for IT, have published a new book giving practical advice on increasing gender diversity and inclusion.

Women in Tech, by Gillian Arnold, Hannah Dee, Clem Herman, Sharon Moore, Andrea Palmer and Shilpa Shah, also acknowledges that the technology industry is not diverse and gender inclusive.

The book tackles the gender imbalance in technology professions offers expertise, initiatives and true stories to support those wishing to bring greater gender diversity into the workplace. It aims to inform regarding background, theory and policy; advise on concrete actions that can be undertaken, and to be an exemplar for companies, organisations, establishments and campaigns in the form of real-world case studies.

Women in Tech: A practical guide to increasing gender diversity and inclusion | Gillian Arnold, Hannah Dee, Clem Herman, Sharon Moore, Andrea Palmer, Shilpa Shah

It has long been recognised that the technology industry is not diverse and gender inclusive. In the UK, the proportion of women in technology roles has remained stubbornly beneath 20% for the last twenty years. With this book we hope to help address that. This guide to tackling the gender imbalance in technology professions offers expertise, initiatives and true stories to support those wishing to bring greater gender diversity into the workplace. It aims to inform regarding background, theory and policy; advise on concrete actions that can be undertaken, and to be an exemplar for companies, organisations, establishments and campaigns in the form of real-world case studies.

BUY THE BOOK HERE
Women in Tech | BCS

Gillian ArnoldSpeaking about the new book, Gillian Arnold, Editor, said,  “There is a real skills-based need to act now in the industry and the technical professions.”

“In the UK, the proportion of women in technology roles has remained stubbornly beneath 20% for the last twenty years.”

“Women have also been the ones to take on the majority of the caring responsibilities during the COVID-19 lockdowns, and consequently their jobs and prospects have suffered.”

“This book lays out some of the sound business reasons that organisations can use to ensure that their whole workforce, from executives through coders, tech specialists and design engineers, recognises and upholds the benefits of diversity and inclusion.”

“It also looks at the support and encouragement available to girls and young women who want to pursue a technical career and outlines the work that is being done on this in schools, universities and colleges, and at a nationwide level.”

“It focuses on the steps required to establish projects to attract and retain women in the technology workforce, and drill down into specific activities for both areas.”

“We look at the biases that have led careers in technology to be discounted for women and how we can counter these.”

“And we offer sound and pragmatic ways to set up a project to increase the numbers of women in technology in workplaces and institutions.”

kay hussainKay Hussain, CEO, Women Into Science and Engineering (WISE) added, “This book is a positive step forward for gender diversity and looks forward to practically supporting the reader to improve gender balance in their organisation.”

“With WISE Ten Steps™ we have a recommended and practical programme that is proven to be impactful.”

“Together we all can successfully address the challenge and thereby benefit individuals, families, communities and the country.”

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TechWomen100 Awards

Sponsors show their support for WeAreTechWomen’s 2021 TechWomen100 Awards

TechWomen100 Awards

Now in their fifth year, the TechWomen100 awards are once again looking to recognise and celebrate the achievements of women working in technology.

Our awards focus solely on women working in tech below director level. We hope that by highlighting the accolades of up-and-coming inspirational female tech talent, we can help to create a new generation of female role models for the industry, and a pipeline of future leaders.

These awards are the first of their kind to focus solely on the female tech talent pipeline and recognise the impact of champions, companies and networks that are leading the way.

In previous years, the awards have been supported by an array of FTSE sponsors and this year is no different.

We are proud to announce that the 2021 TechWomen100 Awards are powered by Goldman Sachs and supported by Accenture, BAE Systems, Bank of America, Credit Suisse, Ipsos Mori, Oliver Wyman, and OpenFin.

We are extremely proud to receive the support of so many individuals and organisations for this years TechWomen100 Awards. We would like to extend our sincere thanks for their words of encouragement and for helping us to celebrate the achievements of the amazing women.

READ WHAT OUR SPONSORS HAVE TO SAY ABOUT THE AWARDS

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Our partners

Discover more about our partners, find out about jobs & gain insights as to what they are doing for women in tech within their organisations

The process

Nominations open online on 02 August via WeAreTechWomen. Nominations will close after a six-week period on 10 September.

A shortlist of 200 women from a range of technology disciplines will be chosen in October by an esteemed panel of judges. There will also be a shortlist of three Champions, Global Award of Achievement, Companies and Networks.

The shortlist will then be published and we will also open the TechWomen100 individual category for public votes of support.

Winners will be announced in November and celebrated at a virtual award’s ceremony on 08 December. There will be 100 winners of the TechWomen100, a Champion of the Year, a Global Award of Achievement, a Company of the Year and a Network of the Year.

Who should nominate?

  • Self-nominations are encouraged
  • Organisations looking to recognise their emerging talent pool
  • Organisation wishing to obtain recognition for their initiatives
  • Individuals who would like to recognise their efforts of their champions/role models
  • Individuals/colleagues/friends/clients/mentors/sponsors of the nominee

Award’s timeline

Nominations open
02 August 2021

Nominations close
10 September 2021

Shortlist announced & public vote opens
25 October 2021

Voting closes
05 November 2021

Winners announced
15 November 2021

Winner’s celebration event  (virtual)
08 December 2021

Opportunities to sponsor

If you are interested in supporting the TechWomen100 Awards as a sponsor, we'd love to hear from you. To be a part of these special awards and to help us inspire and upskill women in tech globally, speak to a member of our team.

Contact Us To Learn More

Calling all women in tech! We want to hear about you and your career

Calling all women in tech – we want to hear about you and your career!

WeAreTechWomen have partnered with leading research firm, Ipsos MORI & Tech Talent Charter to conduct a survey to discover the barriers faced by women working in technology.

The results of this survey will enable us to understand how you feel as a woman in tech and the challenges you face around career progression.

A summary of the survey results will be published alongside a set of recommendations to organisations to help them to understand these challenges and to think about how they can put in to place initiatives to support the career progression of their female technologists.

The survey responses are anonymous and your data will not be shared publicly.


In Partnership With

Ipsos MORI & Tech Talent Charter partner logo

Sahydi Garcia

In Her Shoes: Sahydi Garcia | Vice President, Morgan Stanley

Sahydi GarciaSahydi Garcia is a Vice President of Morgan Stanley in Enterprise Technology and Services based in London.

Sahydi is responsible for driving the adoption and implementation of Agile & DevOps practices and principles for the Corporate Workplace Technology department. She also performs project management/business analyst roles to deliver business outcomes for stakeholders in Corporate Information Management. In January 2016, Sahydi was named Vice President and later that year she accepted a mobility opportunity to move from New York to Glasgow. In October 2018, she accepted a mobility opportunity to London.

Sahydi started her career in Technology at the Firm in 2011 as an IT Service Delivery Manager in End User Technology, supporting the delivery of technology services to end users in Wealth Management branches during the Morgan Stanley-Smith Barney joint venture. She joined Morgan Stanley in 2004 as an Associate in Reengineering and Expense Management based in New York, serving as a Sourcing Manager in Corporate Services.

On a typical workday, how do you start your day and how does it end?

My typical day starts before 6am, which is always followed by a bowl of porridge and cup of coffee. With lockdown easing and outdoor gyms opened, I have been getting in a workout before the workday starts. These days that means a spin or HIIT class. Then, I log on to quickly review emails from the prior evening and shift focus to the biggest priorities I have for the day. My typical workday ends in Zoom meetings with New York colleagues.

Did you ever sit down and plan your career?

I never sat down and strategically planned my career. However, I do periodically stop to think about the next step. Early on, I assumed that I needed to have a grand vision for my life and have it all figured out at once. In actuality, life and careers are rarely linear. My journey has been guided by thinking one step ahead, and my willingness to be uncomfortable and enthusiastically accept new opportunities when presented.

What do you love about working for Morgan Stanley?

I most admire the professional integrity of the people I work with at Morgan Stanley. Our corporate culture is guided by the Firm’s five core values of Do the Right Thing, Put Clients First, Lead with Exceptional Ideas, Commit to Diversity and Inclusion, and Give Back. The work environment reflects those ideals and challenges us to strive for our personal best, regardless of role or position. This enables us to attract incredible people, and I am regularly impressed with the combination of talent and drive my colleagues possess. They make me want to show up and be better.

Have you faced any challenges along the way and if so, how did you overcome these challenges?

Naturally, I have faced challenges in my career. I am surrounded by brilliant people, often with way more experience and knowledge than I have. That is not a comfortable position to be in, but I eventually came to realize that I had two choices. I can feel threatened by this, allow my imposter syndrome to emerge, and have it prevent me from asking questions and getting engaged. Or, I could be vulnerable and embrace that I will not know everything and ask for help. I now approach these situations as a learning opportunity rather than a judgement of my ability.

Have you benefited from coaching, mentoring or the sponsorship of others?

It’s impossible to have a meaningful career on your merit alone. I would not be where I am today without the generosity and support of coaches, mentors, and sponsors. A piece of advice I would give to my younger self is to invest in these types of relationships early on because they truly allow you to ascend. Coaches will help you to improve your skills, while mentors will help you to develop your career, and sponsors will advocate on your behalf when you are not in the room. You need them all, go find them, and don’t just take it from me, take it from Carla Harris!

Do you believe in the power of networking? If so, where do you network?

All my career opportunities have stemmed from the relationships I have built over time, so I firmly believe in the power of networking. Whether you are searching for a new home or shifting careers, your network can bring new opportunities and ideas to light. Personally, I lean heavily on the various professional networks we have at Morgan Stanley, like Women in Technology. We host various networking and knowledge sharing events intended to establish community and new connections across the Technology organization. Still, I look forward to the days where we can mix more casually in person, and we can make new connections casually chatting to the person standing next to you.

What advice would you give to those who aspire to a career in tech?

If you are passionate about problem solving, think creatively, have varied interests, and enjoy learning new things, you can have a fulfilling career in Technology. This does not mean you need to have a CS degree, be a coder, or engineer. Throughout the course of your career in tech, you can pick up different skills and hold different roles. My advice is to pursue what interests you, work hard at it, find ways to make your skills useful, and remain open to change.

What does the future hold for you?

The experience of the pandemic has made me re-evaluate a number of things including planning too far ahead or setting expectations around what the future holds. As a result, this is a difficult question for me to answer. The things I am striving towards this year include being more mindful of where I spend my time (goodbye Instagram, you are missed), questioning whether the time I invest adds value (to others and myself), and no longer postponing experiences, even if they are uncomfortable. Professionally, this has led me to slowly and reluctantly face my fear of presenting to large groups and like most things, it will require a tremendous amount of effort and energy to develop this skill. To answer the question boldly, which is not my natural inclination, in the future you will see me presenting at a TED Talk.

To learn more about Technology careers at Morgan Stanley, please click here

Discover more

In Her Shoes: Emily Beeney | Vice President, Morgan Stanley

Emily Beeney is a Vice President at Morgan Stanley, leading the Information Security Incident Management and Investigations analytics mission to detect potentially malicious Insiders within Morgan Stanley’s network. ​

As Co-Chair of Morgan Stanley Glasgow’s Women in Technology Network, Emily defines and delivers the Firm’s diversity strategy at a local level. ​

Read Emily's interview here
Emily Beeney

TechWomen100 Awards

WeAreTechWomen are proud to announce Goldman Sachs as headline sponsor for our TechWomen100 Awards

TechWomen100 Awards

WeAreTechWomen is excited to announce Goldman Sachs as our headline sponsor for the 2021 TechWomen100 Awards!

Now in their fIfth year, the TechWomen100 awards are once again looking to recognise and celebrate the achievements of women working in technology.

Our strategic objective is to use the awards to highlight 1,000 future female tech leaders by 2030. To date, we have celebrated the success of over 375 incredible women, alongside outstanding tech networks, senior champions who are driving change and companies who are doing their upmost to support the careers of their female technologists.

In previous years, the awards have been supported by an array of FTSE sponsors and this year is no different.

We are extremely proud to announce that the 2021 TechWomen100 Awards are powered by Goldman Sachs. We would like to extend our sincere thanks to Goldman Sachs for their support for this year’s awards, their words of encouragement and for helping us to celebrate the achievements of amazing women.

Want to learn more about Goldman Sachs?

DELVE INTO WHAT THEY DO, DISCOVER THEIR LATEST VACANCIES
AND HEAR FROM SOME OF THEIR EMPLOYEES

ENTER HERE

The TechWomen100 awards focus solely on women working in tech below director level.

We hope that by highlighting the accolades of up-and-coming inspirational female tech talent, we can help to create a new generation of female role models for the industry, and a pipeline of future leaders.

The awards also feature a “Global Award for Achievement” category, to help expand our search for global talent. This category is a female individual who works within the tech industry outside of the UK, whose current position is below director level.

Through the awards, we would also like to recognise a number of senior individuals who are championing up-and-coming women, as well as any organisations that have designed and implemented successful initiatives and programmes in order to attract, retain and develop the female tech talent.

Finally, we applaud the often-voluntary efforts of the women in tech networks that operate across the UK, and again would like to formerly recognise these within our awards.

The TechWomen100 awards are the first of their kind to focus solely on the female tech talent pipeline and recognise the impact of champions, companies and networks that are leading the way.

Opportunities to sponsor

If you are interested in supporting the TechWomen100 Awards as a sponsor, we'd love to hear from you. To be a part of these special awards and to help us inspire and upskill women in tech globally, speak to a member of our team.

Contact Us To Learn More

Blue Origin First Human Flight Wally Funk

Wally Funk becomes the oldest person to go into space

Wally Funk has made history by becoming the oldest person to go into space, and has finally realised her dream of being an astronaut.

Thanks to Jeff Bezos, Funk was finally able to go into space on Blue Origin’s New Shepard first crewed flight to space. The journey was New Shepard’s 16th flight to space.

Funk and Bezos were also be joined by his brother Mark Bezos, and the auction winner on the flight, 18-year-old, Oliver Daemen.

The flight lasted around 11 minutes from launch to capsule landing. Astronauts experienced three to four minutes of zero-gravity and travelled above the Karman Line, which is considered to be the boundary of space.

About Wally Funk

Mary Wallace “Wally” Funk was born 1st February 1939, in Las Vegas.

Wally is an American aviator, commercial astronaut, and Goodwill Ambassador.

She was the first female air safety investigator for the National Transportation Safety Board, the first female civilian flight instructor at Fort Sill, Oklahoma, and the first female Federal Aviation Agency inspector.

Wally is also one of the Mercury 13. The Mercury 13 Women in Space Program was a privately-funded program to see how women would cope with space training.

The women were put through the same rigorous physical and mental testing as male astronauts. Wally passed her tests and was qualified to go into space. Her score was the third best in the Mercury 13 program.

However, despite completing their training, the program was cancelled, and none of the thirteen flew.

Wally never gave up her dream of going into space and  when NASA finally began accepting women in the late 1970s, Funk applied three times. Despite her impressive credentials, she was turned down for not having an engineering degree or a background as a test pilot.

In July 2020, Wally published a memoir, Higher Faster Longer —My Life in Aviation and My Quest for Space Flight .

Watch the launch below


About Blue Origin

Blue Origin was founded by Jeff Bezos with the vision of enabling a future where millions of people are living and working in space to benefit Earth. To preserve Earth, Blue Origin believes that humanity will need to expand, explore, find new energy and material resources, and move industries that stress Earth into space. Blue Origin is working on this today by developing partially and fully reusable launch vehicles that are safe, low cost and serve the needs of all civil, commercial and defense customers. Blue’s efforts to fly astronauts to space on New Shepard, produce reusable liquid rocket engines, create a highly-reusable orbital launch vehicle with New Glenn and return Americans to the surface of the Moon—this time to stay—will add new chapters to the history of spaceflight and move us closer to fulfilling that founding vision.

Blue Origin Astronaut Crew Flight Suits

Yasmin Johal

TechWomen100: What happened next for Yasmin Johal

Yasmin JohalIn this ongoing series, we speak to our winners about life after winning a TechWomen100 Award.

Now in their fifth year, the TechWomen100 Awards recognise and celebrate the achievements of women in tech – the emerging tech talent and role models for the future.

We spoke with Yasmin Johal, who won a TechWomen100 Award in 2020.

Yasmin Johal is an Associate at CMS UK specialising in FinTech and sits in the Financial Services Regulation team. She provides advice and helps shape developments in the fintech industry internationally. She is a committee member of the CMS equIP accelerator programme - designed to nurture the development of tech start-ups across the world. She is also a founding member of both the CMS #Leadhers & BAME founders campaigns, which help increase female & BAME diversity within the tech industry. Yasmin sits on the committee of the BAME Network and Inclusions Mental Health & Wellbeing Network which help foster diversity & inclusion across CMS globally. She is a tech speaker, podcast host and an advocate for increasing female & BAME representation in fintech. She has also authored industry thought leadership pieces on financial regulation, FinTech & innovation. Yasmin was named as one of the Top 35 Women in FinTech worldwide recognised as a Standout 35 Star in the Women in FinTech Powerlist 2020. She was also named as one of WeAreTechWomen’s Top 100 Women in Technology and was a TechWomen100 2020 Award Winner.

How did you feel when it was announced that you’d won a TechWomen100 award?

I was delighted to have won the award and be selected amongst such amazing role models within the tech sector. For me, it really shows the diversity of the tech sphere and also that tech is an industry and a wider ecosystem, and I am excited to be  involved in that ecosystem and be making a contribution in the tech sector.

Please tell us what has happened in your career since winning the TechWomen100 award?

Since the award I was humbled to have been recongised as one of the Top 35 Women in FinTech worldwide recognised as a “Standout 35 Star in the Women in FinTech Powerlist 2020” with Innovate Finance, being commended for my involvement and advancement of the fintech sector. I have also had various speaking engagements, having been a panellist for the One Tech World conference with WATW, speaking with Cajigo regarding Women in Fintech and also speaking at various events regarding diversity within fintech. In addition to this, I have featured in numerous blogs and thought leadership pieces where I have discussed the importance of diverse representation within the fintech ecosystem and have been recognised as an “exceptional female role model”. In my professional capacity, I continue to work with broadsheets and industry bodies to help advance fintech tools and resources for all players within the fintech sphere.

What advice would you give to someone else going through the award’s process?

Network with everyone else that is involved in the award process, you can make so many acquaintances, allies and friends this way!

What tips would you give to our other members to enhance their careers? 

Find your support network, these are the people that will champion your success.


The 2021 TechWomen100 Awards will open for nominations on 02 August 2021. Our awards focus solely on women working in tech below director level. We hope that by highlighting the accolades of up-and-coming inspirational female tech talent, we can help to create a new generation of female role models for the industry, and a pipeline of future leaders.

Discover what happened next for some of our other TechWomen100 winners:

Kulvinder Panesar“I leveraged this award with further a role of a Speaker Manager alongside my current AITN ambassadorship at AiTechNorth.   My role was to enable a dialogue with potential speakers who were business leaders, senior executives, and technologists, and to discuss their talks to find an amicable for the AI Summit Theme.  I have further hosted an AI Tech North – innovation exchange fringe event – AI for Business with two renowned experts on Thursday 18th June.  I feel my personal brand is developing as an academic delivering AI courses, pursuing my conversational AI research and widening my knowledge of the AI space.  My AI tech North activities I feel have enriched my academic delivery.”

Kulvinder Panesar, TechWomen100 Winner 2019

Lisa Ventura“I was in total shock when it was announced that I had won a TechWomen100 award, I couldn’t believe it! I was so honoured to win this award and to be alongside so many other amazing women in the technology industry. It was a dream come true! I was so very sorry not to be able to make the ceremony and meet everyone, my father was in ill health at the time and I couldn’t leave him – I so wish I could have been there to meet all the other amazing and inspiring women who won a TechWomen100 award.”

Lisa Ventura, TechWomen100 Winner 2019


Amelia Hayward

TechWomen100: What happened next for Amelia Hayward

In this ongoing series, we speak to our winners about life after winning a TechWomen100 Award.

Now in their fifth year, the TechWomen100 Awards recognise and celebrate the achievements of women in tech – the emerging tech talent and role models for the future.

We spoke with Amelia Hayward, who won a TechWomen100 Award in 2020.

I create television and digital content watched by millions. Unusually, I have years of both technical and production experience. I am a Multi-skilled Technical Operator working on a range of TV programmes for the BBC’s World Service. In my spare time I direct and produce an award winning online documentary series about a British professional basketball team. My credits include BBC Panorama, BBC Glastonbury, BBC Click, BBC Radio 2, BBC News and Give Me Sport Women. I have also been chosen for talent programmes like the BFI NETWORK x BAFTA Crew and the BBC Women in Technical and Production programme.

How did you feel when it was announced that you’d won a TechWomen100 award?

I was genuinely surprised! It was a real confidence boost to be handed an award that had started with a nomination from someone I admire (Sarah Lambley from the BBC) and then voted for by people I know. That meant a lot to me.

Please tell us what has happened in your career since winning the TechWomen100 award? 

I have left my staff job at the BBC after nearly 11 years, and become a full-time Self-shooting Producer/Director! It's been a huge change, but I've already created a short project for Sky Sports and I'm developing my own documentary projects. I also wanted to use my award to make a difference, so before I left the BBC I organised and presented a Young Reporter Tech Panel aimed at 11 to 18 years olds. We had people from different departments and backgrounds explain their roles and how they got into the BBC. If we inspired at least one young person, then we did a good job.

What advice would you give to someone else going through the award’s process?

Use it as a fantastic opportunity to meet new people from different areas of technology. It doesn't matter if you are not a natural networker, just connect with people and have a chat. I've met lots of amazing women through this process, especially Marlene Spensley from Hitachi Vantara. (She is another award winner). We never would have met otherwise, and Marlene ended up interviewing me for her company's "Tech In Her Words" series.

What tips would you give to our other members to enhance their careers? 

Keep going. If you believe in something don't give up. Ever.


The 2021 TechWomen100 Awards will open for nominations on 02 August 2021. Our awards focus solely on women working in tech below director level. We hope that by highlighting the accolades of up-and-coming inspirational female tech talent, we can help to create a new generation of female role models for the industry, and a pipeline of future leaders.

Discover what happened next for some of our other TechWomen100 winners:

Tina Valand“TechWomen 100 award was life changing. It wasn’t just about the recognition, it opened doors, created meaningful friendships, networks and opportunities to attend great events including the virtual We Are The City conference and gave me a platform and confidence to be brave and take risks. One of the first things was the opportunity to speak at schools inspiring children to study STEM subjects, sharing my journey and path to the accolade. I am very passionate about the importance of supporting the next generation of talent.”

Tina Valand, TechWomen100 Winner 2019

Isabel Chapman“I was delighted and quite surprised to have been announced in the TechWomen100 award, to be honest. It was a huge accolade and a real sign of encouragement that I might not have had a conventional path into it, but that I do in fact work in Tech. The TechWomen100 Awards evening was one of the most amazing evenings, especially considering the next few months have been followed by the lockdown.”

Isabel Chapman, TechWomen100 Winner 2019


Chloe Williams featured

In Her Shoes: Chloe Williams | Software Engineer, DWP Digital

Chloe WilliamsMy name’s Chloe and I’m a Software Engineer at DWP Digital in Leeds. I joined the department in January of this year. Initially I was nervous about starting a new role remotely but the onboarding process was great and the team use a whole host of collaborative tools to keep us connected.

I’m what you would call a career switcher. My background is in marketing but 18 months ago I decided to make the leap into the world of tech. I’ve always worked closely with teams who have built digital products and when the opportunity arose to give coding a go myself, I jumped at the chance.

Now I’m the one that’s building digital products and services, most recently for the Restart Scheme (launching 28th June). The scheme is one of many government initiatives launched under the Plan for Jobs umbrella, focused on protecting, supporting and creating jobs across the country. It’s exciting to think that features that I have built will be used to help more than 1 million Universal Credit claimants who have been directly impacted by coronavirus.

On a typical workday, how do you start your day and how does it end?

Like most people, the typical workday has looked somewhat different over the last year. For one, my commute to the office is a lot shorter. I generally start my day with a cup of tea, give my cat a cuddle and then jump on MS Teams to dial into my team’s stand-up, a daily meeting to check-in and catch up on what we’re all working on.

At DWP Digital, we manage our own hours with flexi-time. This means that sometimes my day finishes at 4pm and others 6:30pm. Typically at the end of the day, I’ll make sure the coding I’ve done is ‘saved’ and then try and motivate myself to do some form of exercise, whether that’s going outside for a walk or playing netball.

Did you ever sit down and plan your career?

Not really. When I was younger I wanted to be a PE teacher, but then when it came to choosing a university course I picked marketing. I’m not much of a planner, and as you get older and gain more life experience your interests and priorities naturally change. I think it’s important to get some form of satisfaction from your job. I’m not saying you have to enjoy every single hour you spend in the office, but if you don’t find your work interesting it’s probably a sign you should move on. That’s not to say everyone needs to switch careers. Even small internal moves or changes in responsibilities can make a big difference.

What do you love about working for DWP Digital?

There are many things I love about working at DWP Digital, but the thing that brings me the most joy is the fact that every day I’m reminded of stories where a feature I’ve helped build has helped someone find work.

I also feel empowered at DWP Digital. I’m involved in conversations with other areas of the business, and I can have my say on how a service should look and behave.

Have you faced any challenges along the way and if so, how did you overcome these challenges?

A personal challenge I’m regularly dealing with is imposter syndrome. In each of the roles I’ve had, at some point I’ve suffered from the feeling – “I’m not good enough”. I cope with it because I know I’m not alone, and the more I speak about it, whether that’s with my manager or with friends, the easier it is to manage.  I also find it helpful to look back at my successes, even things I perceive to be small achievements.

Have you benefited from coaching, mentoring or the sponsorship of others?

I’ve worked with Code First Girls a couple of times to deliver their ‘Introduction to Web Development’ course. Even though I was relatively new to software development myself, I found that teaching the material helped cement my own knowledge. It also helped keep my imposter syndrome at bay as I gained more confidence.

If it’s available to you I’d recommend seeking the guidance of a mentor or coach. Even if it’s informal, it generally helps to speak to someone about their experiences, you never know what nuggets of wisdom you might pick up.

Do you believe in the power of networking? If so, where do you network?

Absolutely.  I think it’s important to speak to others and share experiences. In-person networking has been made more difficult because of the pandemic, I really miss speaking to people face-to-face.

That said, there are still plenty of online meetups and because they’re online they’re generally more accessible. Over the last year I’ve attended a couple of interesting ones run by Northern UX and Leeds JS. A quick Google search will return a whole bunch of tech meetups in your local area.

What advice would you give to those who aspire to have a career in tech?

Don’t be scared to dip your toe, there are so many great resources available, a lot of them free. Try out an online coding course like FreeCodeCamp, CodeFirstGirls or CodeAcademy to name a few.

Read blog posts from your favourite tech companies and learn about their ways of working. DWP Digital have a great one – https://dwpdigital.blog.gov.uk/ which I found really useful before I joined the company. And remember, you don’t need a computing degree to work in tech. Don’t let the jargon put you off, once you start to dive into it, you’ll soon see it’s not as scary as it seems.

What does the future hold for you?

Hopefully a holiday in a nice sunny country!

As I said before, I’m not really a planner, so I don’t like to look too far into the future. But what I do know is that I’d love to continue teaching others about software development. If I can help a few people on their path into tech, then I’ll be happy.


WeAreTechWomen covers the latest female centric news stories from around the world, focusing on women in technology, careers and current affairs. You can find all the latest gender news here

Don’t forget, you can also follow us via our social media channels for the latest up-to-date gender news. Click to follow us on Twitter, Facebook and YouTube.


TechWomen100: What happened next for Kim Diep

In this ongoing series, we speak to our winners about life after winning a TechWomen100 Award.

Now in their fifth year, the TechWomen100 Awards recognise and celebrate the achievements of women in tech – the emerging tech talent and role models for the future.

We spoke with Kim Diep, who won a TechWomen100 Award in 2020.

Kim is a Software Engineer & Tech Coach at Tech Returners and creates and delivers programs to help underrepresented people refresh & upskill in the Software Engineering domain after a career break. Kim also delivers programs to upskill engineers at existing companies in all things DevOps!

As a Tech Content & Workshop Creator & Mentor, Kim helps people engage with technology in fun and practical ways, whether they’re just starting out or looking to improve their skills at any stage of their careers.

Kim is passionate about creating things for tech education and loves sharing her experiences with the community to encourage others to learn and grow in their technical skills and confidence.

How did you feel when it was announced that you’d won a TechWomen100 award?

It was an Autumn morning in October 2020, I was checking my emails and to my surprise, I’d received the email for the TechWomen100 award. It was sent around 8am and I was just waking up! I had to eat my breakfast and re-read the email again, as I thought it must have been a mistake. I couldn’t believe it, so I looked at the website to double-check; it wasn’t a mistake after all! I felt over the moon to be nominated alongside some talented women out there; being featured on the winners list was just the icing on the cake really.

Please tell us what has happened in your career since winning the TechWomen100 award?

Pivoting in my Career and Joining Tech Returners

Since receiving the TechWomen100 award, I wanted to focus on the things that gave me joy. I realised outside of the 9-to-5, I was simply being ‘me’ and the stuff I did were the things that gave me fulfilment. I asked the question, “Why can’t I do this full-time?”.

This got me to pivot between jobs and I’m extremely lucky to have joined as a Software Engineer & Tech Coach at Tech Returners. Beckie Taylor and James Heggs have built something really special here. Every single member of the Tech Returners family is here to genuinely help people in all sorts of things like technical concepts, personal development, confidence and mindset and careers.

At Tech Returners, I work alongside the team to create and deliver programs to help underrepresented people refresh & upskill in the Software Engineering domain after a career break. I also deliver programs alongside James Heggs to upskill engineers at existing companies in all things DevOps!

You can find out more about Tech Returners here.

Becoming an #IamRemarkable Workshop Facilitator

TechWomen100 really boosted my self-confidence. For many years, I would be overly modest about myself and water down my achievements; I realised working hard quietly didn’t mean I was working on the things that really mattered.

Since getting the TechWomen100 award, I kept learning and growing alongside the community. I attended an #IamRemarkable workshop and became an #IamRemarkable workshop facilitator and ambassador of the initiative. #IamRemarkable is an initiative by Google aimed at empowering women and underrepresented groups to speak about their accomplishments in the workplace and beyond.

You can find out more about #IamRemarkable here.

Public Engagements in STEM

One of the most memorable experiences after TechWomen100 was being a workshop creator & speaker for an interactive machine learning workshop ‘Can We Teach a Machine to Recognise a Toy Cat? 😼 ’. This was aimed at 13-16 year old students as part of The National Museum of Computing’s Young Women in STEM Conference. It was lovely to talk to high school students about computing concepts and get them interested in the field.

Back in March 2021, I attended the inaugural Codebar Festival, a 3-day free conference on tech, career and wellbeing. My friends and I created and delivered some free workshops for the international tech community.

Breaking Down my Fear of Podcasts

I was invited to record a podcast episode for a podcast by Pawlean and Pauline really helped to make me feel comfortable for my first ever appearance. I’m pleased to say I have now caught the podcast bug!

Moving Forward!

I’m currently building a space for high school, college, university students, apprentices and early careers to learn about computing and all things tech; but it’s still early days. I’m excited to be launching it soon. I also have a few more workshops, podcast appearances and collaborations, including The National Museum of Computing in the pipeline - watch this space!

What advice would you give to someone else going through the award’s process?

This may sound counter-intuitive, but don’t put getting the award as your primary goal. Instead, focus on the things that bring you joy and fulfilment. This may mean you have to refocus on your own journey and slow down in order to speed up again. Slowing down doesn’t mean no progress! The world's notion of 'success' is flawed; you don't have to be productive all the time to be successful. Like a company has a mission statement and core values, focus on your personal mission statement and values which are unique and special to you. Live and breathe these and the awards will simply be a byproduct.

What tips would you give to our other members to enhance their careers?

Enhancing your career doesn’t mean levelling up in a linear way. Sometimes you may have to step backwards to reflect. This can be hard to do, as it may seem that your peers are still moving and progressing. It’s not a race. By stopping to reflect, you can focus on what makes you tick, what kind of impact you want to make and what person you want to be. You don’t have to reflect and grow alone though, I really encourage you to join some community groups to build your confidence and attend some workshops too. Finally, act with integrity and respect and be mindful to listen and learn from different people from all walks of life. Become a servant leader.

“...when you choose the paradigm of service, looking at life through that paradigm, it turns everything you do from a job into a gift.”
—Oprah Winfrey


The 2021 TechWomen100 Awards will open for nominations on 02 August 2021. Our awards focus solely on women working in tech below director level. We hope that by highlighting the accolades of up-and-coming inspirational female tech talent, we can help to create a new generation of female role models for the industry, and a pipeline of future leaders.

Discover what happened next for some of our other TechWomen100 winners:

Rania Svoronou featured 1"The TechWomen100 Award was one of my proudest moments, as all the women on the list were just incredible and I was thrilled to be part of the Top 100 Women in Tech UK. I am lucky to be surrounded by many wonder women such as Alison Clark, Debbie Vavangas, and Susanne Jones who support me and have changed my life. The global division I work for in IBM, which is IBM iX (Interactive Experience), have been very supportive on my win and I was featured on the internal IBM comms, got shout-outs from the most respected leaders within the company and I gave an interview to Fortune Greece Magazine who featured me on of their ‘successful profiles’. People Greece Magazine also featured me and even my high school did a profile on me to inspire the younger generation of Greek females who want to enter the world of design and technology."

Rania Svoronou, TechWomen100 Winner 2018

Narmada Guruswamy featured"Since the award was announced, I have been featured prominently on the intranet, in the daily news, at gatherings and even at the annual seminar within EY. Winning this award gave me a confidence boost, so I stepped up to head the BAME workstream within the techUK Skills and Diversity council. My social media engagement has increased: I post often on Twitter and LinkedIn with a particular emphasis on positive female stories. About a month ago, I also started mentoring a female entrepreneur in Nigeria through the Cherie Blair Foundation."

Narmada Guruswamy, TechWomen100 Winner 2018