Digital Female Leader Awards, DFLA

Become the face of the digital future! Apply for The Digital Female Leader Award

Digital Female Leader Awards, DFLA

Become the face of the digital future and apply for The Digital Female Leader Award!

The DFLA, an initiative from Global Digital Women, are looking for female founders and designers from companies, politics and society, who are driving digitisation forward and have a lasting impact.

Applications are open until 29 July 2020 and can be submitted in 18 categories including Digital Transformation, Entrepreneurship, Innovation, Career or Diversity. Applications can be submitted online here. In addition to your own application there is also the possibility to nominate friends, colleagues and / or role models.

There will be three finalists in each category and the winner will be announced at the awards ceremony on 28th November 2020.

In addition, the winner of the Audience Award will be chosen by a vote among our community. The voting will take place in August.

APPLY HERE

Further information can be found at: https://digital-female-leader.de/en/


WeAreTechWomen covers the latest female centric news stories from around the world, focusing on women in technology, careers and current affairs. You can find all the latest gender news here.

Don’t forget, you can also follow us via our social media channels for the latest up-to-date gender news. Click to follow us on Twitter, Facebook and YouTube.


Cloud computing featured

Data and computers don’t care about gender – and neither does the cloud!

Cloud computing

Article provided by Lori MacVittie, Principal Threat Evangelist, F5 Networks

Although 2019 was a landmark year for women in tech, with government data revealing over one million women in the UK now work in STEM-related sectors, there is no room for complacency.

As a proportion of the tech workforce, women make up a meagre 16 per cent – a stat that hasn’t moved in the last decade. In fact, in 2019 it dropped 1,500 places from the previous year.

While the wheels are in motion to facilitate greater tech diversity across the world (with varying levels of success), there are still misconceptions about the industry’s ability to support female talent and produce role models in leadership positions. Everyone needs to do more to change that, particularly as we face worldwide shortages in disciplines like security and cloud computing.

Beating the bias

I’m lucky that I come from the Midwest of the US. The area is full of insurance companies and programming jobs with strong female representation. This includes my own mother, who worked as a programmer in the 70s. It just seemed to be part of our culture to have women in these kinds of positions. Fortunately, I haven’t come across many substantial career roadblocks based on my gender.

That being said, like so many other women, I’ve experienced gender-driven bias throughout my career. I’ve dealt with long-standing, ubiquitous issues. This includes male colleagues who won’t take direction from a woman, and dealing with people being taken aback when they realise – lo and behold – that I, and other women in the industry, actually know what we’re talking about! It’s not unusual after speaking at an event to be approached by people who are shocked at my ability to deliver an educational and insightful talk.

We can’t let bias bring us down or stop us from working to achieve our goals. It’s something we must overcome together as an industry, and as a society.

Welcome to the cloud!

It’s important to remember that tech is the fastest-growing industry and there are so many areas within the sector where women can flourish – some more easily than others.

For example, cloud computing has boomed in the last decade. Coincidental or not, its rise was accompanied by a significant drive to support women ‘in cloud’. In fact, cloud as a technology is often credited for democratising the resources needed for women to become entrepreneurs. Anecdotally, I think that the cloud industry has definitely been less challenging to establish credibility in than other technological industries.

That being said, I don’t see the range of opportunities being any different, except within the start-up space. Here, for example, cloud can make it easier to drive an idea to fruition, thanks to the wide range of options it offers. In fact, we’ve seen a recent explosion of women-led start-ups based in (and on) the cloud because of this.

The adoption of cloud-based solutions in the workplace has also meant that it’s easier to balance work and life. The tools you need to work with are accessible from anywhere, even at home. This alone can alleviate stress on women who struggle with work-life balance.

Wherever you go in tech, in the current climate, it’s likely that you’ll end up in a male-dominated environment. If that makes you uncomfortable, then that’s OK. Help and support is there. Make sure you find a mentor early on, or friend who you can share experiences with and lean on. In addition, it is useful to find a business or educational body that will provide the right support to help you lead a successful career.

As an industry, it’s also important that we address a widespread tendency to dismiss women in technology that aren’t in a hands-on role. We need to support and promote all women – irrespective of job title or function.

Whoever you are, whatever you wear, or whatever personality you have, is irrelevant. There’s a role for you in tech. Be bold, be yourself and don’t be put off. If we want change, we need to be the forerunners!

Lori MacVittieAbout the author

Lori MacVittie has been working at F5 for just under 14 years. Having started out as a marketing manager, she has worked her way up to becoming Principal Technical Evangelist in the Office of the CTO.

During her career, Lori has been an application developer, system engineer, consultant, writer, author, strategist, and evangelist. Her specialities include: application development, application integration, application infrastructure, application delivery, application security, cloud, SDN, and DevOps.


If you are a job seeker or someone looking to boost their career, then WeAreTechWomen has thousands of free career-related articles. From interview tips, CV advice to training and working from home, you can find all our career advice articles here.


Anahita Mahmoudi

TechWomen100: What happened next for Anahita Mahmoudi

Anahita MahmoudiIn this ongoing series, we speak to our winners about life after winning a TechWomen100 Award.

Now in their fourth year, the TechWomen100 Awards recognise and celebrate the achievements of women in tech – the emerging tech talent and role models for the future.

We spoke with Anahita Mahmoudi, who won a TechWomen100 Award in 2019.

Born and raised in Iran, Anahita called England home in 2009. She came to London in her early 20s and embraced her diverse spirit. By her early 30s she was one of the top 100 women in the technology sector, a public speaker, a coach, a peace activist and a yoga instructor with a passion for dancing.

Anahita is an experienced business consultant, professional and life coach, where she dedicates her time to helping individuals and organisations to become educated, ethical, and aware of their full potential to embrace change in the workplace and life. Her focus now lies in leadership and transformational coaching. Her ethos considers connecting to true values of life as they lead us in the transition from the present time to a new future world.

How did you feel when it was announced that you’d won a TechWomen100 award?

It was a huge honour to receive an award in recognition of my work. Looking back, I feel this award was not for me, it was for all women; the activists, the doctors and nurses, the mothers and daughters, the teachers and students, who are not only excelling in their roles, but who are  recognising their power and giving something back to our industry and the wider community.

The more we learn about who we are and what we have to bring to our societies and communities, the more we achieve and change. In our present time, there is no job that women have not done and more women are becoming change makers. This for me is the beauty, the magic of our time!

Please tell us what has happened in your career since winning the TechWomen100 award?

Press coverage: I was interviewed by ‘Where Women Work” who aim to inspire and support women career in STEM. Read the full article here

Promotion: I was appointed as a leader of ‘emerging talents’ community in my company to engage, equip and lead classified junior employees to acquire and develop the skills they need to grow within the organisation

Community: I became a Personal Development coach at Code Your Future and currently working with them to empower their students to start their career in the industry

Supported the Future Global Leaders programme (sponsored by Queen Mary University) that aims to build the skills, mindset and cultural agility needed in a future global leader.

Delivered a lightening talk to the students of the school that where I studied, 23 years ago. I am currently working with the headmaster to introduce a series of inspiration talks for their pupils.

Lastly, I am working on introducing an award system for the Women Network Group within the Business Unit where I work.

What advice would you give to someone else going through the award’s process?

Look outside of your day job and think about the values that you are bringing to your team and community.

What tips would you give to our other members to enhance their careers? 

  • All of us dedicating our lives to get money. Do not let that to strain your ambition in reaching what you truly want.
  • A lot of us lose a lot of time, a lot of resources, working on the old stories of our society.
  • Tap into your potentials, explore new opportunities, work on creating new stories.
  • Lastly, learn more and teach more.

The 2020 TechWomen100 Awards are open for nominations on 03 August 2020. Our awards focus solely on women working in tech below director level. We hope that by highlighting the accolades of up-and-coming inspirational female tech talent, we can help to create a new generation of female role models for the industry, and a pipeline of future leaders.


Join us again - enhance your learning with our WeAreTechWomen conference digital pass

WATW- Conference stats- blue woman

Did you miss our conference on 26 June? You can now buy a digital pass which will enable you to watch all 72 sessions over a 14-day period!

BOOK YOUR DIGITAL PASS

Whether you are a technologist or not, tech is something that already is and will become a fundamental part of our work and lives. We built this year’s WeAreTechWomen conference for individuals who are not only working in tech, but for those who are interested in entering the industry.

You don't have to miss out!

Our conference is now available as a digital pass for individuals who didn’t manage to secure a ticket the first time around. With your ticket, you can access the platform for the next 14 days in order to gain a deeper understanding of over 25 different areas of tech. Thanks to the help of over 108 global speakers we have covered everything from Technology Trends, AI, Cyber, Virtual Reality, Augmented Reality, Robotics, Drones, Internet of Things, Wearables, Agile, DevOps, Fintech, Payments, Sustainability, Entrepreneurship, HealthTech and Diversity & Inclusion, Neurodiversity, Mental Health in Tech, Returnships and Flexible Working.

Here is what some of our attendees said who attended the day

"The #WeareTechWomen Conference last Friday, led and hosted by WeAreTechWomen was a truly amazing event. Incredible speakers and a true smorgasbord of topics!"

"Amazing virtual conference from @watc_wearetech #WATWDIL2020Vanessa Vallely OBE CCMI what a day!"

"By far the best online conference I have attended for Women in Tech, can’t wait till next year! Thank you team WeAreTechWomen."

Still not convinced? Take a look at the feedback on our Twitter feed here and our hashtag #WATWDIL2020.

WeAreTechWomen Virtual Conference speakers

By joining the conference via your digital pass, you will also have access to a number of fireside chats including Jacqueline de Rojas in conversation with Baroness Lane Fox, Julia Streets in conversation with Dame Wendy Hall and Vanessa Vallely OBE in conversation with Professor Sue Black and Sharmadean Reid, Founder of Beautystack. Other speakers include, Baroness Joanna Shields, Edwina Dunn OBE, Anne-Marie Imafidon, as well as leading campaigners, academics and thought leaders in the world of tech.

Not only do we have an abundance of inspiring keynotes, we also have over 15 panels where experts in their fields will share their thoughts on what’s next for tech post pandemic, how can companies become carbon neutral, how we foster more diversity in tech, plus many more.

You can also visit all of our sponsors in our virtual exhibition hall. Check out their special offers, find out about jobs and gain insights as to what they are doing for women in tech within their organisations.

As well as having our on-demand stage with over five hours of extra content, you will also have access to our kids stage! All pass holders will also be able to visit the kid’s stage with their children, nieces or nephews to engage them in the world of tech. This stage features a variety of interactive sessions, such as lessons about AI and Cyber, as well as learning to code. These sessions were kindly provided by our partners, TechSheCan, Raspberry Pi, Girlguiding & MAMA.codes

So what are you waiting for?

BOOK YOUR DIGITAL PASS


SPONSORED BY

Tech Conference Sponsors NEW


Carly Britton

TechWomen100: What happened next for Carly Britton

Carly Britton

In this ongoing series, we speak to our winners about life after winning a TechWomen100 Award.

Now in their fourth year, the TechWomen100 Awards recognise and celebrate the achievements of women in tech – the emerging tech talent and role models for the future.

We spoke with Carly Britton, who won a TechWomen100 Award in 2019.

Carly is the Head of Client Services for VUALTO.

Before University she presented on hospital radio and then throughout University presented on University radio whilst studying Media Studies with Information Technology and Computing. With equal interests in both broadcast and technology she wanted to pursue a career in that field.

As a graduate, Carly worked with many different technologies which was great experience, but it wasn’t until she started her journey with VUALTO where she finally found the career she wanted to pursue.

VUALTO was a start-up with three employees when she started, she joined the company as a webcast engineer but as with all start-ups, she did a bit of everything. She soon found a passion for technical support and as the company grew and moved away from webcasting, she worked on technical support full time.

Over the past seven years with VUALTO growing from three to over 40 employees, Carly grew and managed the technical support team, created a Network Operations Centre and she now manages the entirety of the Clients Services function which encompasses four separate teams. She has found a company and a career that is challenging and rewarding.

Carly is extremely passionate about encouraging girls and women to consider careers in technology. She is a STEM Ambassador and regularly gets involved with local STEM events. She also visits schools and shares her journey into technology with career talks and workshops at STEM clubs. With the support of VUALTO she founded #GIRLCODE which is a free coding class for girls aged 8-14 who want to learn to code in a fun and friendly environment.

How did you feel when it was announced that you’d won a TechWomen100 award?

I was honoured to be announced as one of the winning TechWomen100. It is a great feeling of achievement to be recognised by ‘We Are Tech Women’ as a woman to watch in the industry. The ceremony was an inspiring experience of feeling part of something really positive and it was amazing to hear about other women’s experiences that were so similar to my own.

Please tell us what has happened in your career since winning the TechWomen100 award?

Winning this award has provided me with some really great exposure. After winning this I went on and won Women in IT Awards Advocate of the Year 2020. I have been featured as one of 5 Inspirational Women in IT in Interface Magazine. I have been asked to speak at events and be a part of panel discussions. It has been an amazing year so far with lots of exciting things in the pipeline.

What advice would you give to someone else going through the award’s process?

There is so much more to this process than just winning this amazing award. I have made some great connections and have had lots of exciting opportunities off of the back of winning the award. The TechWomen100 community is an inclusive and exciting one to be a part of.

What tips would you give to our other members to enhance their careers?

I have three top tips for enhancing your career:

1. Find yourself an awesome mentor.

2. Technology is a fast-paced industry – do not give yourself an end goal. Instead be flexible and be open to pivoting your career to move along with the pace of the industry.

3. Stand up for what you believe in and failure is a great lesson.

Feel free to reach out to me on Twitter: digitelle_blog


The 2020 TechWomen100 Awards are open for nominations on 03 August 2020. Our awards focus solely on women working in tech below director level. We hope that by highlighting the accolades of up-and-coming inspirational female tech talent, we can help to create a new generation of female role models for the industry, and a pipeline of future leaders.


Tech Returners Launches in London

New Tech Returner Programme to launch in London

Tech Returners Launches in London

Tech Returners, an organisation focused on empowering careers back into technology, is bringing its successful returner programme to London starting in August. 

Tech Returners an organisation focused on empowering careers back into technology is bringing its successful returner programme to London starting in August 2020.

The programme called Your Return to Tech provides skilled tech professionals returning to industry accessible opportunities to refresh their skills and reignite their career but it doesn’t stop at learning and development, the organisation works closely with businesses who recognise the value of industry returners and who are passionate about creating diversity and inclusivity in their teams to provide an innovative tech talent solution.

The eight-week programme recognises the need from businesses growing their teams to bring tech talent to the market quickly and with the skills in place to hit the ground running in mid-senior level technical roles. The entirely remote learning experience boasts a curriculum which includes refreshing existing tech skills, front end frameworks ‘React’ (Hooks, Context, API) alongside Cloud technologies (AWS tooling), delivered alongside platform engineering skills such as infrastructure as code CI/CD and monitoring.

Uniquely the programme will connect with businesses looking to hire from the programme who will provide live briefs for our returners to work on throughout the 8 week period. Interested businesses can sponsor places on the course at a cost of just £4,500 per returner making it an affordable and competitive option versus traditional recruitment agency fees.

It’s a model which has proved successful in the North West of England, since 2017 the organisation has empowered more than 50 returners into mid-senior level technical careers with businesses like AutoTrader, Booking.com, Lloyds Banking Group, ANS and Infinity Works and has worked exclusively with the BBC in Manchester and London respectively, 88% of those returners were women.

The programme is open to anyone returning to a technical career or who have a technical qualification and who have taken a career break from tech for six years or less. Individuals interested in applying for the programme can learn more at https://www.techreturners.com/programmes/your-return-to-tech

Speaking about the programme CEO Beckie Taylor said, “We’ve seen some amazing returners come through our ranks as a result of our work in the North but we know there are so many more out there and with our remote learning model, location need no longer be a barrier to talent."

"Working with London based businesses was the next natural move for us, we know the returner market is there and we’re here to deliver the talent to forward-thinking businesses who are focused on diversity and  taking a fresh approach to tech talent”

Businesses interested in learning more about sponsoring the programme can do so here https://www.techreturners.com/sponsorship/your-return-to-tech and are also invited to sign up to join a free information event on Thursday 9th  July https://share.hsforms.com/1nDOXcLuyRo-ufJoPJbGOkw2g8p6


WeAreTechWomen covers the latest female centric news stories from around the world, focusing on women in technology, careers and current affairs. You can find all the latest gender news here.

Don’t forget, you can also follow us via our social media channels for the latest up-to-date gender news. Click to follow us on Twitter, Facebook and YouTube.

 

 

 


Two Female College Students Building Machine In Science Robotics Or Engineering Class

International Women in Engineering Day 2020: Time to #ShapeTheWorld

Two Female College Students Building Machine In Science Robotics Or Engineering Class, International Women in Engineering Day

The theme for this year’s International Women in Engineering Day is ‘shape the world’: a call to action for women (and men) to challenge gender disparity in the engineering sector.

International Women in Engineering Day is an annual event that showcases the incredible work of female engineers and it aims to encourage more people to think of engineering as a profession for all.

Currently, there is a considerable lack of female representation in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) industry - with women making up just 12.37 per cent of all engineers in the UK, the lowest numbers of any country in Europe.

For young girls, whose future choices are heavily influenced by today’s experiences, lack of visible female representation fuels the misconception that engineering is a career for men wearing high-vis jackets. Whilst people are now more comfortable questioning gender bias in the industry, diversity now being a recognisable issue, there is still a long way to go before gender parity is achieved.

WeAreTheCity, spoke to six female STEM experts to learn about their own career experiences in the engineering industry, and advice for how best to #ShapeTheWorld this International Women in Engineering Day.

STEM starts at school

Imogen Smith, Content GuruSTEM subjects such as engineering are often looked at as being harder for women. This often starts in primary school, where girls can feel social pressures from peers of their local community, to pursue other avenues, like humanities and arts.

Imogen Smith, Applications Engineer at Content Guru, describes her own experience of being deterred from following her passion for mathematics during her A Levels: "At school, I was encouraged to do History or Law over Maths by our Pastoral Care Department and Head of Sixth Form. In fact, the school wasn’t planning on running the Further Maths A-level at all, as it ‘wasn’t a real A level’. But I liked how Maths is so logical, which is probably what drew me to it initially. I think I was always going to end up doing a STEM subject because both my parents have PhDs in Sciences, so I learned to love it from a young age. I consider myself very lucky in that respect."

Jacquelyn-Ferrari, ConnectWise“While I haven’t experienced the common bias against women in tech myself, I recognise the disparity between the genders in the field,” explains Jacquelyn Ferrari, Principal Software Engineer at ConnectWise. "This is largely because women are often deterred from STEM before their careers can even begin. For years, schools didn’t take steps to foster young girls’ love for these subjects, so their interest quickly dropped off. For me, playing video games sparked my interest in engineering. Now, women make up nearly half of the video gamers in the U.S., so I hope those numbers will rise.

“Even as more women enter the field, we must address these social issues and show girls that their enthusiasm can translate into rewarding careers from the start. Organisations like Girls Who Code provide outlets for young women in STEM, but we can also create new programs in our communities, dedicate personal time to educating women and ask our companies to bring resources to underserved communities.”

Make female engineers visible

Agnes Schliebitz-Ponthus, Fluent Commerce 1With girls finding themselves encouraged to pursue alternative paths from a young age, Agnes Schliebitz-Ponthus, Director Consulting at Fluent Commerce, argues that it's important to remind and encourage women and young girls to consider a career in the STEM sector. This is because, “STEM careers such as engineering are male-dominated, with misconception lying in the myth that men are for some reason better suited to these careers. Research suggests that at primary school age, girls and boys are equally excited by these topics. It is by the time they reach senior school, that gender socialisation has already done enough “damage” to impact girls’ enthusiasm for STEM.

“In my own career, I had the opportunity of taking a position at Amazon HQ in Seattle. Whilst there, I was inspired by the substantial numbers of female software engineers from a variety of backgrounds in senior roles. These women worked extremely hard and motivated me to push myself more to perfect my programming and software engineering skills. And now at Fluent Commerce, I'm surrounded by an equally inspiring team working to the common goal of helping retailers adapt quickly to the rapidly changing world of ecommerce.”

Challenge expectations, go for promotions

Agata Nowakowska, SkillsoftAgata Nowakowska, Area Vice President EMEA at Skillsoft, said that it’s not just about recruiting women into STEM, but challenging unconscious gender bias’ and personal expectations, so that they can progress their careers. She suggests: “If we want to see more women in these industries, we need to change how women relate to STEM subjects, and how they measure their own potential. Women are often tougher on themselves, not giving themselves the recognition they truly deserve. Research shows that from primary school age, girls are significantly less likely than boys to view themselves as capable of becoming an engineer if they wanted to. And when looking for a new role, women will apply only if they feel that they meet 95% of the job description, whereas men may apply for the role even if that percentage is much lower.

“Encouraging women to pursue a career in engineering and other STEM disciplines means challenging the unconscious bias that they are not as capable. Women should be confident in their abilities, and not be held back from going for a job, a promotion, or from asking for a pay rise.”

Accelerate change

Debra Danielson, Digital GuardianIn order to accelerate change, Debra Danielson, Chief Technology Officer & SVP of Engineering at Digital Guardian highlights the importance of supporting and participating in events and organisations that help mentor and inspire women. She explains: “Over the past decade I’ve been coaching, mentoring, and guiding women in the industry by supporting and participating in some really great organisations dedicated to leveling the playing field for women and minorities in tech, including Springboard Enterprises, Tech Girls Rock, WITI (Women in Technology International), and the Anita Borg Institute.

“Initiatives like Women in Engineering Day shine a light on how far we as an industry, have to go. At Digital Guardian I’m fortunate to be surrounded by an amazing and diverse team. I never want to work again in an organisation where I’m the “odd man out,” and I’d love it if all women had the opportunity to experience this in their careers.”

Support diversity initiatives

Samantha-Humphries Exabeam“Diversity is now a conversation and a recognisable issue in the industry - which is a step in the right direction,” concludes Samantha Humphries, Security Strategist at Exabeam. “More people are comfortable talking about it and voicing their opinion, and there are more opportunities and safe spaces for people today, which is vital.

“For the last three years, I’ve been involved in The Diana Initiative, which is one of the many conferences that take place at ‘Hacker Summer Camp’ in Las Vegas. They’ve done an amazing job of creating a safe space focused on diversity and inclusion in cybersecurity, where participants feel comfortable to network and learn, and be inspired by speakers at a conference that embraces everyone. I’m also proud to be part of the ExaGals program, which looks to support and empower the women of Exabeam, as well as women in the technology community at large, with career development, education and personal growth opportunities.

“My hope is that by supporting programs that expose and encourage women and girls to the possibilities of an education and career in tech, we can help address the skills shortage by introducing new perspectives and problem-solving skills to the industry.”

International Women in Engineering Day brings to light problems of gender disparity within the engineering sector, but it also enables us to showcase the incredible female (and male) engineers that are working hard each day to make positive change. By giving platform to their voices, and creating opportunities for more girls and women in the industry, we can help to #ShapeTheWorld.


WeAreTechWomen covers the latest female centric news stories from around the world, focusing on women in technology, careers and current affairs. You can find all the latest gender news here.

Don’t forget, you can also follow us via our social media channels for the latest up-to-date gender news. Click to follow us on Twitter, Facebook and YouTube.

 

 

 


Lisa Ventura

TechWomen100: What happened next for Lisa Ventura

Lisa Ventura

In this ongoing series, we speak to our winners about life after winning a TechWomen100 Award.

Now in their fourth year, the TechWomen100 Awards recognise and celebrate the achievements of women in tech – the emerging tech talent and role models for the future.

We spoke with Lisa Ventura, who won a TechWomen100 Award in 2019.

Lisa Ventura is an award-winning Cyber Security awareness consultant and is the CEO and Founder of the UK Cyber Security Association (UKCSA), a membership association that is dedicated to individuals and companies who actively work in cyber security in the UK. She has over 10 years’ experience in the cyber security industry and is passionate about raising awareness of being more cyber aware in business to help prevent cyber-attacks and cyber fraud. She is a thought leader, author and keynote speaker and has been published in various publications globally. Lisa is also an advocate for women in cyber security, the cyber skills gap and neurodiversity.

How did you feel when it was announced that you’d won a TechWomen100 award?

I was in total shock when it was announced that I had won a TechWomen100 award, I couldn’t believe it! I was so honoured to win this award and to be alongside so many other amazing women in the technology industry. It was a dream come true! I was so very sorry not to be able to make the ceremony and meet everyone, my father was in ill health at the time and I couldn’t leave him – I so wish I could have been there to meet all the other amazing and inspiring women who won a TechWomen100 award.

Please tell us what has happened in your career since winning the TechWomen100 award?

Since winning my award I have been included in SC Magazine’s 50 most influential women in cyber security list, as well as shortlisted for the Inspiration Award for the Network Computing Magazine awards. Unfortunately, these awards have been postponed to October due to COVID-19. I was also due to take part as a speaker at various conferences and events including the Cloud and Cyber Expo, the Identity and Think Management Summit and Think Partners Cyber Security for Government event, but all these were postponed due to COVID-19. I have however moved to doing more webinars and speaking online, although it is not the same as the energy you get from being in a room full of inspiring and engaging people. The UK Cyber Security Association is going from strength to strength, and my first book “The Rise of the Cyber Women” is due to be published this year.

What advice would you give to someone else going through the award’s process?

Enjoy the process and if you do win, enjoy that too! I was so humbled proud and honoured to win my award, it now has pride of place on my mantlepiece.

What tips would you give to our other members to enhance their careers?

Fortune favours the bold is one of my favourite sayings – never be afraid to ask for what you want, whether it is a promotion, pay rise or more flexible working hours. What is the worst that can happen, your employer says no, and if you don’t ask you don’t get. Be bold, be brave and be the very best version of yourself.


The 2020 TechWomen100 Awards are open for nominations on 03 August 2020. Our awards focus solely on women working in tech below director level. We hope that by highlighting the accolades of up-and-coming inspirational female tech talent, we can help to create a new generation of female role models for the industry, and a pipeline of future leaders.

 

 

 


Woman wearing a virtual reality headset, Women in RPA Initiative 1

Are you a woman aspiring to pursue a career in tech? Join the Women in RPA Initiative

Woman wearing a virtual reality headset, Women in RPA Initiative

Are you a woman aspiring to pursue a career in tech?  The Women in RPA Initiative might be for you!

The 2020 1 million Women In RPA Initiative is a skills development program which aims to train and up-skill one million women in Robotics Process Automation by 31st December 2020. Yes, we know it sounds impossible, that's why we are doing it.

Despite decades of progress towards achieving equality in the workplace, women remain significantly under-represented in emerging tech. The imbalance between men and women in the technology sector is unlikely to be remedied unless organizations, schools and universities work together to change entrenched perceptions about the tech industry, and also educate young people about the dynamics and range of careers in the technology world.​

Women currently hold 19 per cent of tech-related jobs at the top ten global tech companies, relative to men who hold 81 per cent. In leadership positions at these global tech giants, women make up 28 per cent, with men representing 72 per cent.

RPA Nuggets want to change this!

Inspired by Blue Prism, RPA Nuggets takes the baton to empower women and other underrepresented groups to take risks and realize their full potential in the workplace, particularly in emerging technologies.

Eligibility

  • Must be female or identify as female
  • Must be 18+
  • Must have access to uninterrupted WIFI and a laptop/PC
  • Must be computer literate, please note this programme does not teach basic computer literacy skills
  • Must be able to commit 4 weeks, 2hrs a day without absence, starting 6th July 2020 (times TBA)
  • Open to all countries and nationalities worldwide
  • Must understand English (NO EXCEPTIONS). Strictly, medium of presentation is English
  • Pay a non-refundable enrollment fee of $15 (excl VAT)

Program Details

  • Introduction to Robotics Process Automation using Blue Prism
  • Introduction to Connected RPA (Cloud, AI/RPA in Business)
  • Advanced Blue Prism Automation techniques
  • Learning material included
  • Practical based learning approach using real world simulation projects and case studies
  • Best Practice Automation methodologies
  • RPA professional skills and career development
  • RPA virtual career expo
  • Accreditation exam preparation
  • Networking with RPA experts ​
  • Closing date - ongoing

FIND OUT MORE HERE

RPA Nuggets, Women in RPA Initiative


WeAreTechWomen covers the latest female centric news stories from around the world, focusing on women in technology, careers and current affairs. You can find all the latest gender news here.

Don’t forget, you can also follow us via our social media channels for the latest up-to-date gender news. Click to follow us on Twitter, Facebook and YouTube.


three women in tech working on laptops, gender diversity

Schools, industry & recruiters need to do more to improve gender diversity in cyber security

three women in tech working on laptops, gender diversity

Schools, industry and recruiters need to do more to improve gender diversity in the cyber security industry, a new report has suggested.

The report, published by CREST, the not-for-profit body that represents the technical security industry, found that while awareness around gender diversity has improved, there is still work to be done to make a significant difference. The report highlights the progress that has been made in gender diversity across the cyber security industry in the past few years, and points to the next steps to further address the gender gap.

In polls taken at CREST’s gender diversity workshop, only 14 per cent of attendees argued that not enough work has been done to lessen the gender gap, but 86 per cent believed that while progress has been made, it is not nearly enough.

The study also found that 59 per cent of participants classified their experience in the industry as mixed, having received support and enjoyed roles but pointing to obstacles and challenges that had to be overcome as a result of being female.

The workshops had the primary focus and objective of inspiring change and concluded that the main priorities for change are encouraging girls at school to study computer science; improving visibility of female role models; challenging the perception of industry and perceived gender-specific roles; and industry-wide female mentoring and coaching.

The report suggests that the primary reason for the underrepresentation of women in the cyber security industry is down to a lack of interest in the subject from school age. When considering ways to make change, the report recommends that industry leaders – including directors, CEOs and accreditation bodies – could and should be responsible for approaching schools help educate and encourage students. Schools could also promote initiatives such as CyberFirst’s online Girls Competition, which aims to inspire the next generation of young women to consider computer science as an option with a view to a future career in cyber security.

Findings by CREST also point to issues with current recruitment practices, including the way job descriptions are written, the language used and arguably even candidate requirements. Female representatives at the workshops agreed that the inclusion of training options on the job advert would encourage more female applicants, as would flexible working hours, good maternity policies and back to work support. Another key finding is the demand for an industry-wide female mentoring and coaching scheme to create a stronger, closer female community whilst enabling women to grow and develop in their careers.

Speaking about the report's findings, Ian Glover, President of CREST, said, "It is encouraging that as an industry we are making progress, but there is a lot more to do and improving the visibility of female role models will allow us to challenge the perception of the cyber security industry."

"Schools hold the key and we need to help them to encourage more girls into the industry."

"Furthermore, the mentoring scheme would give a platform on which role models can help coach and guide others, which in turn will help to challenge the perception of gender as it relates to the industry."

"The actions are well-thought through, they are doable but just need the support of industry, education and recruiters."

You can download the full report here.


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