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International Girls in ICT Day, an initiative backed by the ITU (International Telecommunication Union), the UN’s specialised agency for information and communication technologies.

Girls in ICT Days aims to encourage and empower girls and young women to consider studies and car​eers in the growing field of ICTs,​ enabling both girls and technology companies to reap the benefits of greater female participation in the ICT sector.

International Girls in ICT Day is celebrated every year on the fourth Thursday of April.

Over 357,000 girls and young women have already taken part in more than 11,100 celebrations of International Girls in ICT Day in 171 countries worldwide.​

Government ministries, national ICT regulatory authorities, ICT companies, academic institutions, UN agencies, and NGOs around the world are all encouraged to join the global effort and ​​celebrate International Girls in ICT Day.

Watch the 2019 message from ITU below:


So how we can encourage more girls into STEM?

Currently in the UK, women make up only 17 per cent of the technology workforce. This is statisticly lower than any other industry sector.

So how can we encourage more girls into STEM?

Start early

Currently only seven per cent of students taking computer science A-level courses are female. Further to this, just half of the girls that study IT and Tech subjects at school go into a job in the same field.

According to studies, girls are more likely to be put off taking STEM subjects at school, due to the gender stereotypes of ‘boy’s subjects’.

There are currently a number of campaigns aiming to tackle to gender disparity and to encourage more women into technology roles.

The Tech She Can Charter is a commitment by organisations to work together to increase the number of women working in technology roles in the UK. It aims to tackle the root cause of the problem at a societal level by inspiring and educating young girls and women to get into tech careers and sharing best practice across the organisations involved.

The Tech Talent Charter is a commitment by organisations to a set of undertakings that aim to deliver greater gender diversity in the UK tech workforce.

Tech She Can and the Tech Talent Charter are working closely together to address the gender imbalance in technology roles.

Alongside this, the WISE campaign calls for gender balance in scient, technology and engineering, from the classroom to the boardroom.

However, more work needs to be done at an early age to encourage girls into STEM and tech and to combat the stereotypes.

Showcase women in tech role models

By highlighting inspiring women in tech, girls can see what careers and achievements are open to them. WeAreTechWomen has showcased some awe-inspiring women as part of our Inspirational Profile series – below are just a select few examples:

Jacqueline de Rojas featuredInspirational Woman: Jacqueline de Rojas CBE | President, techUK

Jacqueline is the President of techUK and the President of the Digital Leaders board. She sits as a Non-Executive Director on the board of UK technology business Rightmove plc; on the board of Costain plc, which is committed to solving the nation’s Infrastructure problems; and is also on the board of the online retailer AO World plc. An advisor to fast moving tech businesses and a business mentor at Merryck offering board and executive level coaching. She is the co-chair at the Institute of Coding, advises the board of Accelerate-Her and is especially delighted to lend her support to the Girlguiding Association for technology transformation. Passionate about diversity and inclusion which informs where she places her support.

Inspirational Woman: Sheree Atcheson | Tech Business Consultant, Deloitte; Founder of I Am Lanka; Global Ambassador at Women Who Code

Listed as one of the UK’s Top 35 Most Influential Women in Tech 2017 by ComputerWeekly, one of the Belfast Business Top 50 2017, and a finalist in the Women in Business NI 2017’s Young Business Woman of the Year category, 26-year-old Sheree Atcheson (@nirushika) is a tech business consultant at Deloitte, founder of I Am Lanka, and UK expansion director at Women Who Code.

As well as her day-to-day life in the industry, Sheree is a tech outreach leader across the UK.

As a passionate advocate for gaining and retaining women in the tech industry, in 2013, she brought Women Who Code to the UK. Women Who Code is a global non-profit, working to eradicate the gender bias through free hack nights, tech talks and career trainings. The UK cohort (Belfast, London, Edinburgh and Bristol) has featured in several publications, such as HuffPost, Wired, ComputerWeekly, The Guardian, Marie Claire and many more.

The aim of Sheree’s career is to ensure people are aware of the fantastic opportunities the tech industry has to offer, and that
everyone – regardless of gender, race or social stature – is able to benefit from these and reach their full potential in their careers.

Hayley-Sudbury-featuredInspirational Woman: Hayley Sudbury | Founder & CEO, WERKIN

As an openly out LGBT+ female tech entrepreneur, Hayley supports professional LGBT+ communities through WERKIN’s CSR programmes, and sponsorship and support of Lesbians Who Tech.

The technology developed at WERKIN allows more LGBT+ professionals to be visible and supported in their careers. Externally, Hayley is committed to creating a fundamental shift for the female, LGBT+ and BAME talent pipeline and uses her technology to support mentoring programmes for a number of LGBT+ organisations, including Lesbian and Bisexual professional women, and OUTstanding. Her company is a UK partner of Lesbians Who Tech, providing support by hosting and sponsoring the London Summer Party. She is also an active mentor in the Stemettes programme, currently mentoring a female BAME undergrad computer science student.

Kerrine Bryan featuredInspirational Woman: Kerrine Bryan | Award-winning engineer & founder of Butterfly Books

Kerrine Bryan – an award winning black female engineer and founder of Butterfly Books.

Kerrine has gone on to smash many glass ceilings to become respected in her field.

She was shortlisted in Management Today’s 35 Women Under 35 for notable women in business and, in 2015, she won the Precious Award for outstanding woman in STEM. Kerrine is a volunteer mentor for the Institute of Engineering & Technology (IET) and is an avid STEM Ambassador. It was while she was undertaking talks at various schools across the country for children about engineering and what her job entails that she became inspired to set up her independent publishing house, Butterfly Books.

In response to this, Kerrine published a series of books (My Mummy Is A Scientist, My Mummy Is An Engineer and My Mummy Is A Plumber) as a means of communicating to children a positive message about all kinds of professions, especially STEM careers, that are suffering skill gaps and diversity issues. The fourth book in the series, My Mummy Is A Farmer, launched last month – August 2018.

Anisah Osman Britton featuredInspirational Woman: Anisah Osman Britton | Founder & CEO, 23 Code Street

Anisah Osman Britton runs 23 Code Street.

In 2012 Anisah won the Young Entrepreneur Festival in London, which brought together 150 of the best young minds in the country.

Since leaving school, Anisah has pursued internships around the world, learnt to code, worked as ops director for a corporate accelerator and started 23 Code Street.

Anisah believes there are multiple routes to success, and that students need to be shown all possibilities.


Here at WeAreTechWomen, we also run our annual TechWomen100 Awards, which highlights the achievements of 100 amazing women in the tech pipeline.

We hope that by highlighting the accolades of up-and-coming inspirational female tech talent, we can help to create a new generation of female role models for the industry.

Find out more about our awards here.

Get involved

There are a number of women in tech charities and not-for-profits that aim to get girls interested in ICT and STEM. You can find out more on our volunteering page here.

Stemettes new logo featuredStemettes

Stemettes aim to inspire the next generation of females into Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths(STEM) fields by showing them the amazing women already in STEM via a series of panel events, hackathons, exhibitions, and mentoring schemes.

All girls will be able to make informed decisions about careers in Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths (STEM), so that eventually women can be proportionally represented in the field. So that we can have 30 per cent+ of the UK’s STEM workforce being female, as opposed to just 13 per cent.

TeenTech featuredTeenTech

TeenTech run lively large scale but sharply focused events to help young people, their parents and teachers understand the opportunities in contemporary industry. TeenTech is aligned with STEM – all activities are designed to help students understand the context for subjects they are learning at school.

TeenTech events across the UK with a supporting award scheme so students and teachers can take their interests further. Many events are deliberately sited in areas of greater social need and TeenTech encourages schools to bring mixed ability students. Each event brings together 10 students from 30/50 different schools and 30/50 organisations and universities for a day of challenges and experiments that are carefully timetabled.

Students are then encouraged to run their own projects to ‘make life better, simpler or easier’ with support from industry in the TeenTech Awards. These projects are structured so they are a valuable experience for every single student who participates, not just those who reach the final at The Royal Society or the winners who are invited to Buckingham Palace.

Code Club featuredCodeClub

A nationwide network of volunteer-led after school coding clubs for children aged 9-11

CodeClub create projects for volunteers to teach at after school coding clubs or at non-school venues such as libraries. The projects they make teach children how to program by showing them how to make computer games, animations and websites. CodeClub volunteers go to their local club for an hour a week and teach one project a week.

Each term the students will progress and learn more whilst at the same time using their imaginations and making creative projects. Terms 1 & 2 use Scratch to teach the basics of programming. Term 3 teaches the basics of web development using HTML and CSS. Term 4 teaches Python and so on.