Dan Bladen, CEO and co-founder of Chargifi

DiversityDiversity is a superpower. Brands that have a diverse workforce foster creativity and become a melting pot of ideas.

Employees from different backgrounds, makes a company unique in its own skin.. But even beyond that, if diversity does not exist amongst those who are building our tomorrow, we will find ourselves with a world that does not resonate with the people living in it. What an unimaginable catastrophe that would be. This makes the notion that diversity and inclusivity in the workplace is just about brand reputation or – even more detrimentally – a compliance issue rather than a huge business asset, a monumental mistake.

The world is going through a dramatic technological change and for many businesses, that means breaking the glass ceiling and launching a ship into new waters, just as we are at Chargifi in the wireless charging industry. Whilst this is an exciting endeavour, it requires someone to dare to be the first, to challenge conventional ways and to step outside of a comfort zone to create new opportunities.

When we launched Chargifi in 2012, people were sceptical about wireless charging. Chartering in new territory requires a test and learn mindset and it’s this very way of thinking and learning that has been the critical foundation to our culture. Innovation requires someone to be brave, whether that means convincing a local neighbourhood cafe to prototype the trial of your product or service (as we did at Chargifi) or sparking conversations with some of the world’s biggest enterprises’. Courage in culture is the key to unlocking this brave nature.

There is no doubt leaders are the principal architects of an organisational culture that will stand as a firewall against exclusivity. A deeply embedded and established culture, one that is expressed in member self-image, expectations and guiding values – to the extent to which freedom is allowed in decision making, developing new ideas and personal expression – is so vital to a thriving and progressive workforce.

Culture is not and should not be treated as a tick-box exercise. There is no one-size fits all model and it’s vital leaders appreciate their role in spearheading its evolution. Diversity has genuinely been a foundation of making the Chargifi brand and product what it is today. Even when we were a 10-strong team, we were a creative mix of nationalities from across the world, and for some, joining the team meant committing to a courageous relocation to the UK, a feat in itself. We have always chosen people who are the best at what they do and the best fit for the company. Needless to say, experience has taught us that those who do not recognise the need to adapt, fail to bring together a diverse team with different skills, ideas and experiences. In doing this, a company will ultimately fail to understand different viewpoints, make informed decisions and drive solutions.

Dan Bladen, CEO and co-founder of ChargifiAbout the author

Dan Bladen, CEO and co-founder of Chargifi

Chargifi was born as a result of Dan spending six months traveling around the world in late 2012. He realised that he made strategic decisions about the venues we visited because of the availability of power sockets, so he could recharge and reconnect with friends and family back home. If he had gone traveling in 2006, he would have a connection problem: WiFi wasn’t as ubiquitous as it is today. Now, the problem is power – simply staying charged.