Teresa Tang

Teresa Tang is SVP, Head of Analytics, Data Science, and Data Engineering at Brightcove, a streaming technology business.

Teresa Tang is an accomplished leader in the data, technology, media, content, streaming, direct-to-consumer, and business-to-business space with a track record of leading, scaling and transforming teams and organisations. Teresa joins Brightcove from MasterClass where she was their VP of Analytics, Data Science, and Data Engineering and a key member of the Executive Leadership Team while helping lead MasterClass’ Series E and F funding rounds of $100M and $225M, respectively. 

Previously, Teresa held leadership positions at CBS Interactive across Business Intelligence, Analytics, and Product. She served as a key advisor to the C-suites and enabled the rapid growth of the multi-billion-dollar revenue digital and streaming sector of CBS Interactive. During her nearly decade-long tenure at CBS Interactive, she established the Business Intelligence and Analytics functions from scratch and was the architect of the company’s digital data platform. Teresa was also a key member in the founding of CBS All Access (now Paramount+; a broad SVOD and live streaming service), CBSN (a 24/7 global streaming news service), and CBS Sports HQ (a 24/7 sports news network).

Teresa is a member of The Academy of Television Arts & Sciences, a founding member of Gold House, and serves as an advisor to several startups, public companies, and accelerator programs. She is a champion of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion by instituting meaningful initiatives and driving lasting relationships for employee resource groups in various organisations. Teresa earned a Bachelor’s degree in Statistics from the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor and a Master’s degree in Statistics from Harvard University.

Tell us a bit about yourself, your background, and your current role:

Since college, I have been heavily interested in data – before it was a popular or heavily discussed and recognised field among large organisations.

For more than a decade now, I have been working with data as it relates to the technology and entertainment industry, especially as these two fields have continuously become closer and closer.

I recently joined Brightcove as the Senior Vice President, Head of Analytics, Data Science, and Data Engineering. I lead data strategy and advance all aspects of Brightcove’s data capabilities. As a globally respected streaming technology company, we are transforming and evolving the company and video and content landscape with the power of data. Our centralised Data organisation – which consists of Analytics, Business Intelligence, Data Science, and Data Engineering teams – is a specialised, cross-functional group that collaborates with various departments to drive decisions and provide direction for future growth at Brightcove.

Before Brightcove, I was the first senior executive-level hire for MasterClass as the company’s VP of Analytics, Data Science, and Data Engineering and a key member of the Executive Leadership Team. I established all data functions and was responsible for growing and evolving all aspects of the business with data.  Before MasterClass, I held leadership positions at CBS Interactive across Business Intelligence, Analytics, and Product. While there, I served as a key advisor to the C-suite and enabled the rapid growth of the multi-billion-dollar revenue digital and streaming sector of CBS Interactive. I was a key member in the founding of CBS All Access (now known as Paramount+, a broad SVOD, and live streaming service), CBSN (a 24/7 global streaming news service), and CBS Sports HQ (a 24/7 sports news network).

Outside of my day-to-day work, I’m also a member of The Academy of Television Arts & Sciences, an advisor and founding member of Gold House, and serve as an advisor to several startups, public companies, and accelerator programs. I earned my Bachelor’s degree in Statistics from the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor and my Master’s in Statistics from Harvard University.

Did you ever sit down and plan your career? 

I’ve always been intentional about my career and setting short and long-term goals. When starting my studies in statistics,  my professors and peers were adamant that I would only have two career paths to follow – neither of which I was particularly interested in. I decided I was interested in data but knew I wanted to use it differently. When I saw there wasn’t an easy, clear-cut career path to what I wanted to do, I set myself to carve that path for myself, bringing me to where I am today. The data science and statistics field looks very different now than it did 20+ years ago, and I am thankful I took the path I did. My core values have always guided my career choices and goals. I reflect and calibrate one to two times a year to determine if my path is serving me and leading me to where I want to go. Having a plan is essential, but it’s also critical to be flexible, inviting, and open to new opportunities that may not be part of the original plan. Sometimes, having the courage to recognise those and take that path may yield the greatest reward.

Have you faced any career challenges along the way, and how did you overcome these?

We are all faced with career challenges – some big, some small, and how we react makes a big difference. When faced with these, I generally stay calm and level-headed, focus on solving the issue, and seek common ground. I take each challenge as an opportunity to learn and grow and add those strengths and development areas to my toolbox. Building solid bonds and professional relationships in and outside of the workplace has been proven to be beneficial. Most importantly, stay true to yourself, advocate for yourself, and stay grounded in your values.

 What has been your biggest career achievement to date?

There have been several achievements I am proud of – too many to mention. Still, the common theme among them is having the privilege to build high-performing, cohesive teams and develop individuals into great, influential, compassionate leaders. That’s what excited me most about taking this position at Brightcove, as that will be one of the core components of my role as I build out our data organisation.

What one thing do you believe has been a major factor in your achieving success?  

It’s hard to point out only one thing that helps someone be successful. For me, it boils down to three key things:

  • Being intentional about my career and where and how I spend my time (including projects, people), and setting short and long-term goals – my core values have always guided these career choices and goals;
  • Being prepared and knowing your worth (especially important as a woman in this field); and 3) a combination of grit, resilience, and determination.

What top tips would you give to an individual who is trying to excel in their career in technology? 

My general career advice for those looking to advance in the technology field:

  • Be intentional about where you spend your time and energy
  • Learn to know yourself so you can be yourself
  • Think of your career as a journey – it’s not a race
  • Be curious and continue to grow and learn new technology
  • Bias towards action and willingness to experiment
  • Be technically strong but also excel at the ability to communicate and storyteller (complex and technical) ideas and solution

However, we should treat each piece of advice as an experiment. They may or may not be relevant to your unique situation.

What barriers for women working in tech are still to be overcome?

Although we’ve made progress for women working in tech fields, there are still tremendous barriers to overcome. These include:

  • Gender and unconscious bias
  • Gender pay gap
  • Lack of advancement opportunities and representation (especially at the senior leadership / C-suite level)
  • Stereotyping (including societal expectations on gender roles)
  • Harassment
  • Lack of workplace flexibility
  • Lack of recognition
  • Lack of allies

What do you think companies can do to support and progress the careers of women working in technology?

There isn’t one path to improve gender diversity in tech. We need to tackle it at all angles. We need to be aware, measure, and be intentional to affect change. Some of these changes can include:

  • Workforce Changes:
    • Expanding recruiting efforts, the sourcing process, and optimising job descriptions to invite a wider candidate pool that is inclusive
  • Workplace Changes:
    • Build a culture of belonging and inclusion from the top-down and bottom-up
    • Diversity, equity, and inclusion (DE&I) training to reduce biases such as gender
    • Set goals for management teams to measure and monitor
    • Have a senior leadership team that is gender balanced and inclusive so representation is visible to all employees and external stakeholders
    • Elevate and mentor a diverse workforce
  • Marketplace Changes:
    • Be intentional about the product and content we put out in the market

In an ideal world, how would you improve gender diversity in tech?

In an ideal world, I would combine all of the workforce, workplace, and marketplace changes I shared as a start to propel equity and equality for gender diversity in the tech industry.

What resources do you recommend for women working in tech, e.g., podcasts, networking events, books, conferences, websites, etc.?

Finding resources to continue your personal and professional development is important to keeping yourself passionately curious. Here are a few of the resources I find worthwhile:

Written/audio books:

  • Designing Your Life by Bill Burnett and Dave Evans
  • Radical Candor by Jill Scott
  • Shoe Dog by Phil Knight
  • Working Backwards by Colin Bryar and Bill Carr
  • The Ride of a Lifetime by Bob Iger
  • Principles by Ray Dalio
  • Dare to Lead by Brené Brown

There are a lot of local and industry conferences and events that are beneficial for development and networking too. Some national-level ones are:

  • Grace Hopper Conference
  • Simmons Leadership Conference
  • Women in Data Science (WiDS) Conference
  • Women in Tech
  • Girls Who Code

Above all – my motto and advice for anyone trying to carve their spot in any industry is this: Find your community and seat at the table. If there’s no seat at the table, build your own house and invite everyone in.


Read more about our inspirational women here.