Artificial intelligence. Human head outline with circuit board inside, AI

Overcoming six AI challenges in 2021

Artificial intelligence. Human head outline with circuit board inside, AI

2020 has been a year of tumultuous change and 2021 isn’t set to slow down.

Technology has been the saving grace of the waves of turbulence this year, and next year as the use of technology continues to boom, we will see new systems and processes emerge and others join forces to make a bigger impact. From assistive technology to biometrics, ‘agritech’ and the rise in self-driving vehicles, tech acceleration will be here to stay, with COVID-19 seemingly just the catalyst for what’s to come. Of course, the increased use of technology will also bring its challenges, from cybersecurity and white-collar crime to the need to instill trust in not just those investing in the technology, but those using it, and artificial intelligence (AI) will be at the heart of this.

Gurpreet Purewal, Associate Vice President, Business Development, iResearch Services, explores how organisations can overcome the challenges presented by AI in 2021.

Instilling a longer-term vision

New AI and automation innovations have led to additional challenges such as big data requirements for the value of these new technologies to be effectively shown. For future technology to learn from the challenges already faced, a comprehensive technology backbone needs to be built and businesses need to take stock and begin rolling out priority technologies that can be continuously deployed and developed.

Furthermore, organisations must have a longer-term vision of implementation rather than the need for immediacy and short-term gains. Ultimately, these technologies aim to create more intelligence in the business to better serve their customers. As a result, new groups of business stakeholders will be created to implement change, including technologists, business strategists, product specialists and others to cohesively work through these challenges, but these groups will need to be carefully managed to ensure a consistent and coherent approach and long-term vision is achieved.

Overcoming the data challenge

AI and automation continue to be at the forefront of business strategy. The biggest challenge, however, is that automation is still in its infancy, in the form of bots, which have limited capabilities without being layered with AI and machine learning. For these to work cohesively, businesses need huge pools of data. AI can only begin to understand trends and nuances by having this data to begin with, which is a real challenge. Only some of the largest organisations with huge data sets have been able to reap the rewards, so other smaller businesses will need to watch closely and learn from the bigger players in order to overcome the data challenge.

Controlling compliance and governance

One of the critical challenges of increased AI adoption is technology governance. Businesses are acutely aware that these issues must be addressed but orchestrating such change can lead to huge costs, which can spiral out of control. For example, cloud governance should be high on the agenda; the cloud offers new architecture and platforms for business agility and innovation, but who has ownership once cloud infrastructures are implemented? What is added and what isn’t?

AI and automation can make a huge difference to compliance, data quality and security. The rules of the compliance game are always changing, and technology should enable companies not just to comply with ever-evolving regulatory requirements, but to leverage their data and analytics across the business to show breadth and depth of insight and knowledge of the workings of their business, inside and out.

In the past, companies struggled to get access and oversight over the right data across their business to comply with the vast quantities of MI needed for regulatory reporting. Now they are expected to not only collate the correct data but to be able to analyse it efficiently and effectively for regulatory reporting purposes and strategic business planning. There are no longer the time-honoured excuses of not having enough information, or data gaps from reliance on third parties, for example, so organisations need to ensure they are adhering to regulatory requirements in 2021.

Eliminating bias

AI governance is business-critical, not just for regulatory compliance and cybersecurity, but also in diversity and equity. There are fears that AI programming will lead to natural bias based on the type of programmer and the current datasets available and used. For example, most computer scientists are predominantly male and Caucasian, which can lead to conscious/unconscious bias, and datasets can be unrepresentative leading to discriminatory feedback loops.

Gender bias in AI programming has been a hot topic for some years and has come to the fore in 2020 again within wider conversations on diversity. By only having narrow representation within AI programmers, it will lead to their own bias being programmed into systems, which will have huge implications on how AI interprets data, not just now but far into the future. As a result, new roles will emerge to try and prevent these biases and build a more equitable future, alongside new regulations being driven by companies and specialist technology firms.

Balancing humans with AI

As AI and automation come into play, workforces fear employee levels will diminish, as roles become redundant. There is also inherent suspicion of AI among consumers and certain business sectors. But this fear is over-estimated, and, according to leading academics and business leaders, unfounded. While technology can take away specific jobs, it also creates them. In responding to change and uncertainty, technology can be a force for good and source of considerable opportunity, leading to, in the longer-term, more jobs for humans with specialist skillsets.

Automation is an example of helping people to do their jobs better, speeding up business processes and taking care of the time-intensive, repetitive tasks that could be completed far quicker by using technology. There remain just as many tasks within the workforce and the wider economy that cannot be automated, where a human being is required.

Businesses need to review and put initiatives in place to upskill and augment workforces. Reflecting this, a survey on the future of work found that 67 per cent of businesses plan to invest in robotic process automation, 68 per cent in machine learning, and 80 per cent investing in perhaps more mainstream business process management software. There is clearly an appetite to invest strongly in this technology, so organisations must work hard to achieve harmony between humans and technology to make the investment successful. 

Putting customers first

There is growing recognition of the difference AI can make in providing better service and creating more meaningful interactions with customers. Another recent report examining empathy in AI saw 68 per cent of survey respondents declare they trust a human more than AI to approve bank loans. Furthermore, 69 per cent felt they were more likely to tell the truth to a human than AI, yet 48 per cent of those surveyed see the potential for improved customer service and interactions with the use of AI technologies.

2020 has taught us about uncertainty and risk as a catalyst for digital disruption, technological innovation and more human interactions with colleagues and clients, despite face-to-face interaction no longer being an option. 2021 will see continued development across businesses to address the changing world of work and the evolving needs of customers and stakeholders in fast-moving, transitional markets. The firms that look forward, think fast and embrace agility of both technology and strategy, anticipating further challenges and opportunities through better take-up of technology, will reap the benefits.


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WeAreTechWomen are proud to unveil their TechWomen100 winners for 2020

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WeAreTechWomen, powered by BAE Systems, are proud to announce the winners of the 2020 TechWomen100 Awards.

The winners of these awards showcase remarkable women within the technology and STEM sector including 12-year-old Avye Couloute, who, aware of female under-representation in STEM education and careers, founded Girls Into Coding to encourage more female involvement in tech; Susan Jason, a Principal Systems Engineer and Head of Outreach at In-Space Missions, who led the final test phases of the Faraday-1 commercial rideshare nanosatellite; and Heather Black, who founded Supermums, which helps upskill mums (and dads) back into flexible work in the Salesforce ecosystem.

The winners include individuals from leading firms such as the BBC, NatWest, Jaguar Land Rover, IBM, Trainline, Visa, Deloitte, Microsoft, Bank of England and Monzo Bank, amongst many more.

DISCOVER OUR WINNERS

The awards also recognise Champions, Networks and Companies, who are all actively supporting the progression of women in tech and STEM. New for this year, the TechWomen100 awards are also celebrating women in tech from outside the UK, in the Global Award for Achievement category.

WeAreTechWomen also announced their Editor’s Choice winner, June Angelides. Named the 6th Most Influential BAME tech leader by the FT in 2018 and 15th Most Influential Woman in Tech by Computer Weekly in 2018, Angelides is an early stage investor at Samos Investments. Prior to joining the world of venture capital, she founded a social enterprise, Mums in Technology, which was the first child-friendly coding school in the UK.

Those receiving the Editor’s Choice award are individuals who have been specifically selected by the leadership team at WeAreTechWomen and one independent judge. This award recognises their outstanding contribution and tireless efforts towards women in tech.

Since August 2020, WeAreTechWomen has been searching the UK for the best female tech talent in the country. The TechWomen100 awards are the first of their kind to focus solely on the female tech talent pipeline and to also recognise the impact of champions, companies and networks that are leading the way for future generations of tech talent. This year’s winners join an alumnus of 250 winners from 2017, 2018 and 2019. Highlighting the achievements of these women is part of the WeAreTechWomen’s campaign to shine a spotlight on 1,000 future female leaders in technology by 2025.

Speaking about the awards, Vanessa Vallely OBE, Founder of WeAreTechWomen, said, “At WeAreTechWomen we have made it our personal mission to shine a spotlight on women working in tech. Our strategic aim is to highlight 1,000 female future leaders in technology by 2025. The response to this year’s awards has been fantastic and the calibre of entries has been outstanding! I am so proud to see so many women in tech recognised for their achievements and look forward to celebrating our winners and their achievements.”

Theresa Palmer, Global Head of Diversity & Inclusion, BAE Systems Applied Intelligence, added, Year after year we choose to partner with the WeAreTheCity organisation for one simple reason. They get it. The TechWomen100 awards offers on-going opportunities and membership to a wealth of information and networking to a community of women at the forefront of changing an industry globally. At BAE Systems Applied Intelligence we want to help drive that in any way that we can. Our industry depends on the best and brightest and supporting the growth and development of women in all roles across the technology industry. In a year when we can no longer see the diversity in our meeting rooms and client sites it seemed fitting to step up and headline such an important event. We see the value in celebrating what makes us unique and are very proud to be headline sponsor of the TechWomen100 awards.”

The awards were entered by over 700 nominations from across the UK and Ireland and the nominees received over 35,000 votes of support from across the globe. The calibre of entries for these awards was exceptional and all of the judges stated how difficult it was to arrive at a final list, due to the amazing achievements of our nominees.

The awards were entered by over 700 individuals and were judged by a panel of 14 independent judges. The 2020 awards are kindly powered by BAE Systems and sponsored by Accenture, Barclays, Credit Suisse, Goldman Sachs, J.P. Morgan, Oliver Wyman and OpenFin.


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Women in Tech Awards - TechWomen100 Awards 2020

One week to go until nominations open | TechWomen100 Awards 2020

TechWomen100 Awards 2020

Just one week to go until nominations open for the TechWomen100 Awards 2020.

It is no secret that the technology industry lacks female representation at all levels. Women make up just 17 per cent of the industry. There are some fantastic awards for women working in tech, however, most of these focus on senior women.

Whilst we feel it is extremely necessary to highlight senior and influential women, we also believe the pipeline of female technologists need a platform to shine.

This is why the TechWomen100 Awards were created. Our awards focus solely on women working in tech below director level. We hope that by highlighting the accolades of up-and-coming inspirational female tech talent, we can help to create a new generation of female role models for the industry, and a pipeline of future leaders.

New for this year, we are also excited to introduce a new “Global Award for Achievement” category to our awards to expand our search for global talent. This category is a female individual who works within the tech industry outside of the UK, whose current position is below director level.

Through the awards, we would also like to recognise a number of senior individuals who are championing up-and-coming women, as well as any organisations that have designed and implemented successful initiatives and programmes in order to attract, retain and develop the female tech talent.

Finally, we applaud the often-voluntary efforts of the women in tech networks that operate across the UK, and again would like to formerly recognise these within our awards.

The TechWomen100 awards are the first of their kind to focus solely on the female tech talent pipeline and recognise the impact of champions, companies and networks that are leading the way.

The 2020 awards are kindly powered by BAE Systems and sponsored by Accenture, Credit Suisse, Goldman Sachs, J.P. Morgan and Oliver Wyman.

Nominations

Nominations open online on 03 August via WeAreTechWomen. Nominations will close after a six-week period on 11 September.

A shortlist of 200 women from a range of technology disciplines will be chosen in October by an esteemed panel of judges. There will also be a shortlist of three Champions, Global Award of Achievement, Companies and Networks.

The shortlist will then be published and we will also open the TechWomen100 individual category for public votes of support.

Winners will be announced in November and celebrated at a virtual award's ceremony on 08 December. There will be 100 winners of the TechWomen100, a Champion of the Year, a Global Award of Achievement, a Company of the Year and a Network of the Year.

Who should nominate?

  • Self-nominations are encouraged
  • Organisations looking to recognise their emerging talent pool
  • Organisation wishing to obtain recognition for their initiatives
  • Individuals who would like to recognise their efforts of their champions/role models
  • Individuals/colleagues/friends/clients/mentors/sponsors of the nominee

Award's timeline

  • Nominations open – 03 August 2020
  • Nominations close – 11 September 2020
  • Shortlist announced & public vote opens – 26 October 2020
  • Voting closes – 13 November 2020
  • Winners announced – 16 November 2020
  • Winner's celebration event – 08 December 2020

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TechWomen100 Sponsor Bubble LATEST


Women in Tech Awards - TechWomen100 Awards 2020

Two weeks to go until nominations open | TechWomen100 Awards 2020

TechWomen100 Awards 2020

Just two weeks to go until nominations open for the TechWomen100 Awards 2020.

It is no secret that the technology industry lacks female representation at all levels. Women make up just 17 per cent of the industry. There are some fantastic awards for women working in tech, however, most of these focus on senior women.

Whilst we feel it is extremely necessary to highlight senior and influential women, we also believe the pipeline of female technologists need a platform to shine.

This is why the TechWomen100 Awards were created. Our awards focus solely on women working in tech below director level. We hope that by highlighting the accolades of up-and-coming inspirational female tech talent, we can help to create a new generation of female role models for the industry, and a pipeline of future leaders.

New for this year, we are also excited to introduce a new “Global Award for Achievement” category to our awards to expand our search for global talent. This category is a female individual who works within the tech industry outside of the UK, whose current position is below director level.

Through the awards, we would also like to recognise a number of senior individuals who are championing up-and-coming women, as well as any organisations that have designed and implemented successful initiatives and programmes in order to attract, retain and develop the female tech talent.

Finally, we applaud the often-voluntary efforts of the women in tech networks that operate across the UK, and again would like to formerly recognise these within our awards.

The TechWomen100 awards are the first of their kind to focus solely on the female tech talent pipeline and recognise the impact of champions, companies and networks that are leading the way.

The 2020 awards are kindly powered by BAE Systems and sponsored by Accenture, Credit Suisse, Goldman Sachs, J.P. Morgan and Oliver Wyman.

Nominations

Nominations open online on 03 August via WeAreTechWomen. Nominations will close after a six-week period on 11 September.

A shortlist of 200 women from a range of technology disciplines will be chosen in October by an esteemed panel of judges. There will also be a shortlist of three Champions, Global Award of Achievement, Companies and Networks.

The shortlist will then be published and we will also open the TechWomen100 individual category for public votes of support.

Winners will be announced in November and celebrated at a virtual award's ceremony on 08 December. There will be 100 winners of the TechWomen100, a Champion of the Year, a Global Award of Achievement, a Company of the Year and a Network of the Year.

Who should nominate?

  • Self-nominations are encouraged
  • Organisations looking to recognise their emerging talent pool
  • Organisation wishing to obtain recognition for their initiatives
  • Individuals who would like to recognise their efforts of their champions/role models
  • Individuals/colleagues/friends/clients/mentors/sponsors of the nominee

Award's timeline

  • Nominations open – 03 August 2020
  • Nominations close – 11 September 2020
  • Shortlist announced & public vote opens – 26 October 2020
  • Voting closes – 13 November 2020
  • Winners announced – 16 November 2020
  • Winner's celebration event – 08 December 2020

POWERED BY

SPONSORED BY

TechWomen100 Sponsor Bubble LATEST


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WeAreTechWomen Conference 2020: In Words

WeAreTechWomen conference 2020

WeAreTechWomen, the technology arm of WeAreTheCity, hosted its first virtual, full-day conference for female technologists.

The conference, proudly sponsored and supported by Accenture, BAE Systems, Barclays, Credit Suisse, Dell Technologies, Goldman Sachs, J.P. Morgan, NatWest, Oliver Wyman, OpenFin; PwC; and RBC; saw over 1,000 delegates log on, from across the technology sector and a range of companies including Sky, Aviva, RAF, Finding Ada, Stemettes, Mastercard, Three, Foreign & Commonwealth Office, Shell and Monzo.

The conference consisted of six stages, with over 60 speakers, 20 exhibitors and over 15 Q&A panels. Delegates could shape their own learning as well as revisiting sessions they may have missed, with a 30-day playback.

The morning began with a number of keynotes from inspirational role models in tech, including Jacqueline de Rojas CBE, President, techUK; Dame Stephanie Shirley CH, IT Entrepreneur & Philanthropist; and Edwina Dunn OBE, Chairman, Starcount and Founder, The Female Lead.

Jacqueline de RojasSpeaking during her keynote about digital inclusion, Jacqueline de Rojas CBE said, "We need to more to make sure no one is left behind."

"Women make up 47 per cent of the UK workforce but only 17 per cent of the tech workforce, and only 15 per cent from a minority ethnic background."

"Diversity matters because equality is a noble cause, it's good for business and to create a digital world that works for everyone."

Dame Stephanie Shirley 1Speaking during her keynote, Dame Stephanie Shirley CH said, "I pioneered the concept of women returners and began a crusade for women - a company of women, a company for women, and early social business."

"For years, I was the 'first woman this' and the 'only woman that'...I couldn't even open the company's bank account without getting my husband's permission..."

"Never ever take today's freedoms lightly."

Across the day, delegates enjoyed listening to a number of high-profile speakers including Professor Sue Black OBE, Professor of Computer Science & Technology Evangelist; Martha Lane-Fox CBE, Entrepreneur & Co-Founder, lastminute.com & Founder, Dot Everything; Sharmadean Reid, Founder, WAH Nails & Beautystack; Baroness Joanna Shields OBE, Group CEO, BenevolentAI; Wincie Wong, Head of Rose Review Implementation, NatWest; Sam Smethers, Chief Executive, The Fawcett Society; Mark Martin, Computer science lead, South Bank Engineering UTC aka Urban Teacher - UK Black Tech; and Anne Boden MBE, CEO & Founder, Starling Bank.

Throughout the day, delegates heard about topics such as AI, Cyber Security, Robotics & Drones, Virtual & Augmented Reality, Fintech, Green Tech, Health Tech, and many more. Attendees could also pose their questions to speakers via a number of virtual Q&A sessions. Topics ranged from the future of tech after COVID-19, data ethics, the future of banking, and health tech.

WeAreTechWomen Conference panel

Those attending the conference also had the opportunity to view two more exclusive stages - on-demand and the KiDS stage. The on-demand stage featured over five hours of content, including a fireside chat with Dame Wendy Hall; a look at how Formula 1 team, Williams is supporting women in engineering; Trinity, a keynote speaking robot; and gaming with Kate Russell.

The KiDS stage was designed for children, aged five to 15. WeAreTechWomen are avid supporters of encouraging children to enter the world of technology, and delegates were actively encouraged 'bring along' their own children, nieces or nephews. The stage featured a variety of interactive sessions, such as lessons about AI and Cyber, as well as learning to code. These sessions were kindly provided by our partners, TechSheCan, Raspberry Pi, Girlguiding & Code First Girls.

Networking booths - WeAreTechWomen conference

Networking and visiting an exhibition hall were still on the agenda - albeit virtually. On the day, there were several networking lounges for delegates to attend and chat in group forums and personal one-to-one chat rooms. The exhibition hall featured 13 booths, where attendees could meet and engage with sponsors, download handouts and documents, chat with experts and watch additional videos.

Check out more of the conference buzz here.

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TrustRadius Women in Tech Report

2020 Women in Tech Report | TrustRadius

TrustRadius Women in Tech Report

This is the second annual Women in Tech Report published by TrustRadius to celebrate International Women’s day (and women in tech every day).

The report addresses critical issues for women in the technology industry in 2020, and incorporates responses from over 700 tech professionals.

The survey was open to everyone who works in the tech industry— women, men, and people of all other gender identities. TrustRadius invited its global audience and their networks to take part. They also made a donation to nonprofit organization Girls Who Code on behalf of participants to thank them for their time.

DOWNLOAD THE REPORT


Happy New Year 2020

Happy New Year!

Happy New Year 2020

From all at WeAreTechWomen, we would like to wish all of our clients, members and visitors a very happy New Year and a great 2020!

WeAreTechWomen has had an incredible year, and earlier this week, we looked back at our top moments, as well as the top news stories, inspirational profiles, and careers advice of 2019.

You can view these articles below:

Looking back at 2019: Our top tech career advice articles

In our first installment of looking back at 2019, we delved into our favourite and inspiring career advice articles of the year.

WeAreTechWomen prides itself on having the answers you need to take the next step in your career. Our careers advice section offers the latest and most relevant tips on networking, legal advice, CV advice, interview advice and much more.

Looking back at 2019: Our top Inspirational Women in Tech interviews

We delved into our favourite and fascinating Inspirational Women & HeForShe interviews of the year.

Our Inspirational Women series of interviews aims to highlight amazing women across the globe, showcase their achievements and raise their profiles.

Looking back at 2019: Our top tech news stories of the year

Continuing on our series of looking back at the past year, we delve into some of the most important tech news stories of 2019.

This year has seen many organisations call for more women in tech and STEM; WeAreTechWomen became its own dedicated site in 2019; and we shined a spotlight on a further 100 amazing women in tech.


diversity, boys club featured

What are the key challenges for diversity in tech in 2020?

diversity, boys club

Article provided by Rachel McElroy, chief marketing officer cloud and technology-focused managed service provider Solutionize Global

With emerging trends firmly focused on Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning and the increased use of tech in vital sectors such as healthcare, building a diverse workforce in this evolving landscape is now more pertinent than ever before.

It’s imperative for enterprises to build solutions encompassing many voices and reflect the input of the talented individuals throughout their teams – to prevent inherent bias in the innovation they bring to the marketplace.

Digital developments introduced by organisations must be truly representative of their end users’ wants, needs and interests. But what does that mean when tackling the immense diversity challenges within the sector that exists and how that will impact on what lies ahead?

To understand the best way to approach this is by reviewing the cool, hard facts on diversity. Yes, times are changing in the technology world – and more importance is being placed on building a diverse and inclusive workforce – but top, diverse talent is still battling to break through into an industry that has innovation and disruption at its heart.

Delving into the data

For example, in 2014 key Silicon Valley companies – including Apple, Google, Microsoft and Facebook published their diversity numbers for the first time – revealing how their teams were predominantly white or Asian men.

Five years on, Apple’s diversity figures still make for grim reading. The phone giant employs the same amount of black technical workers (six per cent), despite 13 per cent of the US population being black.

Meanwhile, delving into Facebook’s released data, 23 per cent of its technical workforce is female – which has seen an increase of 15% since 2014 – and Google reported similar numbers too. And although Amazon don’t publish their numbers concerning the split between technical, distribution and other employees, the e-commerce firm reports that 42 per cent of its workers are women.

When some of the most well-known US tech giants are struggling to make a substantial difference to the overall demographic of their staff list, how can other enterprises realistically make a difference? And how does that translate when thinking about the UK tech landscape?

Analysing the nation’s digital workforces

According to the most recent Tech Nation Report on diversity and inclusion – which analysed 12.5 million UK businesses registered with Companies House – only 19% of UK tech workers are female and 15 per cent are from BAME (Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic) backgrounds.

In addition, when it comes to leadership roles, 22 per cent of tech directors are women. Comparatively, in the wider business community, such figures are only a little different – with a 71/29 per centsplit between the male and female sexes.

Although things are improving, albeit at a slow pace, it can still make for depressing reading – especially when considering how the last two decades of data show that the proportion of women in tech boardrooms has simply plateaued. And this all comes off the back of many high-profile campaigns and a renewed awareness of how a diverse directorship or senior leadership team can directly, and positively, impact a company’s bottom line.

As the UK tech evolution grows three-times faster than the overall economy – contributing an impressive £200 billion a year – it shows how much it is revolutionising enterprises and providing the exciting, myriad of roles now available to the motivated and digital savvy staff member.

So, why is diversity still such a challenge?

Perhaps something can be said with regards to the lengthy, historical backdrop of poor representation that technology has played when being viewed as a viable career choice for women.

Additionally, education has an important role throughout, as it possesses the opportunity to empower the workforces of tomorrow and showcase the incredible force that digital disruption embodies. For example, ICT has typically been viewed as a sector working in silos and only suited to men with analytical minds. However, it should be highlighted as an exciting, collaborative and innovative career that can truly change the face of how companies now operate.

It’s time to challenge recent research that reveals how 48 per cent of women feel that a lack of mentors was a blocker towards a technology career. This needs to be tackled as an industry and by those working in it.

These are the statistics that really matter to analyse and truly affect change. The Bank of England’s recent analysis shockingly revealed that ethnic minorities in the UK earn around 10 per cent less than white workers.

Could 2020 be the year when enterprises truly focus on recruiting a diverse mix of top tech talent from a range of backgrounds and providing them with a workplace that is inclusive and rewarding to all? Let’s hope so.

It all comes back to one simple question – how can the right digital products and services be built to provide a viable solution for everyone if we all have the same voice?