Anisah Osman Britton featured

Inspirational Woman: Anisah Osman Britton | Founder & CEO, 23 Code Street

 

Anisah Osman Britton

Anisah Osman Britton runs 23 Code Street.

In 2012 Anisah won the Young Entrepreneur Festival in London, which brought together 150 of the best young minds in the country.

Since leaving school, Anisah has pursued internships around the world, learnt to code, worked as ops director for a corporate accelerator and started 23 Code Street.

Anisah believes there are multiple routes to success, and that students need to be shown all possibilities.

Tell us a bit about yourself, background and your current role

I’m Anisah, and I am the CEO and Founder of 23 Code Street, a coding school for all women where for every paying student, we teach digital skills to a woman in the slums of India.

After doing the International Baccalaureate at college, I interned in businesses around the world- an upgraded gap year, so to speak.

I then ran a company, which allowed students to earn some extra cash by doing odd jobs for individuals and companies. This is when i started to get into technology and began learning how to to code.

When I finished with that company, I went to work for a corporate accelerator called The Bakery. I learned loads about startups and corporates, and was lucky to be sent on a coding course which cemented my foundations and my love for web development.

I started 23 Code Street out of frustration at the lack of women with technical skills and understanding, and the effect this had on products and services. We need more representation across the board.

Did you ever sit down and plan your career?

Ha! No. I thought I was going to be an actor/director/pilot/translator...I fell into tech. I didn’t plan it.

Have you faced any particular challenges along the way and if so, how did you deal with them?

Of course! The biggest challenge I am currently facing is my health. I have Myasthenia Gravis which literally means grave muscular weakness, is a rare long-term condition that causes muscle weakness that comes and goes. It’s sometimes hard for me to get to work, and sometimes my eyelids are droopy which means I don’t want to be seen by anyone which is something I’m trying to overcome. I’m dealing with it by listening to my body, cutting out sugar, sleeping, and being more active.

If you could change one thing for women in the workplace, what would it be?

Across the board equality. Simple. And technical skills. OK, I cheated.

How would you encourage more young girls and women into a career in STEM?

I would show them the vast range of things you can do in STEM- it’s not just about white coats, it’s not just about “hacking”, it’s not just about being a math professor- you can be a fashion designer, make up creator, an inventor, a games maker, a marketer, a business owner, a superhero...My point is, especially from my tech perspective, that having technical skills is relevant no matter what industry you are in. To encourage them, I would show them and tell them the stories of women and non binary people doing amazing work right now.

How do you feel about mentoring? Have you mentored anyone or are you someone’s mentee?

I think mentoring can be incredibly powerful. I am currently formally training as a mentor with the incredible organisation Creative Mentoring Network,  and have a brilliant mentee called Adora who wants to get into computer science which brings me so much joy.

I have a few people who I’d consider my mentors, but it’s not a formal thing. They have taught me tonnes and opened up doors for me, so they deserve that status. To their faces though, I call them friends.

What has been your biggest achievement to date?

Getting 23 Code Street past year 2 and having our own lovely office space in Clerkenwell.

What is your next challenge and what are you hoping to achieve in the future?

My next personal challenge is to have a tech column. I’d love to write from inside the industry about what is currently happening in an accessible way. I’d love to interview people who work in the industry who are not necessarily the founders so there are different roles to aspire to.

In terms of 23 Code Street, we are going online and we are going global. Our next webinar course, which can be taken from anywhere in the world as long as they speak English, is a daytime course. I’m so excited to see who that brings through our (virtual) doors.


23-Code-Street-featured

Why it’s finally time to learn to code

23 Code Street

When thinking about what new skill to learn or a career change, have you ever thought about coding?

Every day we all visit websites and use different apps – these are all built by using code. Essentially, code is a set of rules and instructions that we give a computer which bridges the gap between human language and computer language.

Everyone can learn to code – you really don’t need to be a math genius or a ‘bro’ wearing a hoodie. These are just outdated stereotypes, in fact, women were actually the original pioneers of tech.

All you need is a motivation to learn and time to practice. You’ll be able to use skills you’ve developed in previous jobs and other experiences to help you- like problem-solving, basic math, an eye for detail, and the ability to Google!

For the past two and a half years, 23 Code Street has been teaching women how to code. For every paying student, they teach digital skills to a disadvantaged woman in India. They run part-time web development courses for beginners which include an internship so students can get hands-on work experience. Below they’ve rounded up their top reasons to start coding:

Learn an in-demand skill

Due to the digital skills gap, employers are constantly looking to hire people with a technical understanding. As our world becomes more and more digital, the number of technical jobs needing to be filled is increasing. This report found that there are over seven million jobs which require coding skills, and programming jobs, overall, are growing 12 per cent faster than the market average.

23 Code Street graduates have gone on to work as developers, been promoted as a result of their new tech skills and even become coding teachers. Natalja, a freelance graphic designer, completed their course last year and now works as a teaching assistant for the school.

Say goodbye to the 9-5

Coding can be part of a great flexible career and help you be in control of your own work/life balance. Many coding jobs can be done remotely at hours that suit you. You can work for a company, be a freelancer, or use coding as a way to up-skill in your current profession. Kelly is a mum of two boys and wanted to learn to code to be able to work alongside tech teams with confidence and work flexibly around her children- you can read her blog here.

Enjoy a rewarding career

At first, learning to code may seem daunting, a bit like learning a new language, but you’ll soon start to realise how it all pieces together and that is a hugely rewarding feeling.

You can’t help but feel proud after you’ve built your first proper web page- something you’ve written, now lives online! The tweet below was from Iqra who received a scholarship as part of 23 Code Street x Amaliah’s  to learn to code scholarship.

23 Code Street

Feel empowered and empower other women

Tech is seriously lacking women. Globally 88 per cent of developers are men; this is having a huge impact on innovation and the products and services being released- for example, Apple released a health app without a period tracker on.  By learning to code, you ’ll be helping create a more gender-balanced tech industry,  smashing gender stereotypes and inspiring next generation of girls to work in tech.

Interested in learning to code? Find out more about 23 Code’s Street next Web Development Foundation starting on the 14th March here.

Source: WeAreTheCity - Information and jobs portal for business women


23 Code Street

23 Code Street

23 Code Street

23 Code Street is a coding school for women (those who identify as and non-binary).

For every paying student, they teach digital skills to a disadvantaged woman in the slums of Mumbai.

They envision a world where the tech workforce represents the diversity of our society.

A world that innovates and builds products for everyone.23 Code Street aims to forever change the tech culture to make it more inclusive and accessible to all.

FIND OUT MORE


23-Code-Street-featured

23 Code Street launches online course to improve the number of women in tech

23 Code Street

23 Code Street, a coding school for all women, has announced the launch of their new pilot webinar course starting on the 4th July.

The course has been designed for beginners with no, to very little, previous experience to provide students with a strong foundation in web development- that is, how to build websites and applications for the web. It will be delivered through interactive webinars (online seminars) that will take place once a week. Throughout the rest of the week, students are able to communicate with teachers online through the enterprise chat tool, Slack. As it’s a pilot, the course will be sold at the reduced price of £400.

Women are underrepresented in the UK’s technology scene. According to the Office of National Statistics’ recent figures, in 2017 only 3.9 per cent of tech professionals in the UK were female programmers and software developers.

Going online enables more women to learn to code; the course was created to reach people not in London, people who can’t afford the price tag of the in person course, and those who need to learn remotely due to other responsibilities such as parenthood or travel.

Speaking about the course, Anisah Osman Britton, founder of 23 Code Street, said, “There’s definitely a demand for an online course."

"Since day one, we’ve been asked to create something that could be accessed remotely.”

“Talent isn’t only found in London- we want all women across the country, and further, to have access to high-quality technical education."

"The women who do our courses don’t have to or want to, become developers necessarily, but instead want a technical understanding which they can bring to the jobs and industries they work in."

"Others do it to have control of their own business, and others are on the road to become amazing developers."

"With a workforce that represents our society, we will have innovation that will serve us all.”

Over the past two years, the school has run in person training courses for 8 cohorts of students who have gone on to have successful careers in various industries.

23 Code Street is a school for those who identify as women and non binary people. To them, culture is Queen and at the centre of everything they do. Moving away from the industry stereotypical culture of ego and competition, they believe in the power of relationships and the importance of peers being a source of knowledge.“Working in a group with just women, we were very supportive of each other and encouraged each other to learn from one another”, says Mina Begum, a graduate from cohort 1.

23 Code Street has a global impact. Part of the fees paid by women on their courses in London pays to teach digital skills to disadvantaged women in the slums of Mumbai.

If you’re interested in learning more and signing up for their new course, please visit www.23codestreet.com/courses
or email [email protected]


23-Code-Street-featured

Why it's finally time to learn to code

 

23 Code Street

When thinking about what new skill to learn or a career change, have you ever thought about coding?

Every day we all visit websites and use different apps - these are all built by using code. Essentially, code is a set of rules and instructions that we give a computer which bridges the gap between human language and computer language.

Everyone can learn to code - you really don’t need to be a math genius or a ‘bro’ wearing a hoodie. These are just outdated stereotypes, in fact, women were actually the original pioneers of tech.

All you need is a motivation to learn and time to practice. You’ll be able to use skills you’ve developed in previous jobs and other experiences to help you- like problem-solving, basic math, an eye for detail, and the ability to Google!

For the past two and a half years, 23 Code Street has been teaching women how to code. For every paying student, they teach digital skills to a disadvantaged woman in India. They run part-time web development courses for beginners which include an internship so students can get hands-on work experience. Below they’ve rounded up their top reasons to start coding:

Learn an in-demand skill

Due to the digital skills gap, employers are constantly looking to hire people with a technical understanding. As our world becomes more and more digital, the number of technical jobs needing to be filled is increasing. This report found that there are over seven million jobs which require coding skills, and programming jobs, overall, are growing 12 per cent faster than the market average.

23 Code Street graduates have gone on to work as developers, been promoted as a result of their new tech skills and even become coding teachers. Natalja, a freelance graphic designer, completed their course last year and now works as a teaching assistant for the school.

Say goodbye to the 9-5

Coding can be part of a great flexible career and help you be in control of your own work/life balance. Many coding jobs can be done remotely at hours that suit you. You can work for a company, be a freelancer, or use coding as a way to up-skill in your current profession. Kelly is a mum of two boys and wanted to learn to code to be able to work alongside tech teams with confidence and work flexibly around her children- you can read her blog here.

Enjoy a rewarding career

At first, learning to code may seem daunting, a bit like learning a new language, but you’ll soon start to realise how it all pieces together and that is a hugely rewarding feeling.

You can’t help but feel proud after you’ve built your first proper web page- something you’ve written, now lives online! The tweet below was from Iqra who received a scholarship as part of 23 Code Street x Amaliah’s  to learn to code scholarship.

23 Code Street

Feel empowered and empower other women

Tech is seriously lacking women. Globally 88 per cent of developers are men; this is having a huge impact on innovation and the products and services being released- for example, Apple released a health app without a period tracker on.  By learning to code, you ’ll be helping create a more gender-balanced tech industry,  smashing gender stereotypes and inspiring next generation of girls to work in tech.

Interested in learning to code? Find out more about 23 Code’s Street next Web Development Foundation starting on the 14th March here.


Anisah Osman Britton

Anisah Osman Britton | 23 Code Street

Anisah is the founder and CEO of 23 Code Street, a coding school for all women created to make technology more accessible to women and non binary people. Anish began learning how to code at 19 out of necessity because she started a company and grew to love it.

Anisah previously worked for The Bakery, a global accelerator bringing new products and services to market by connecting startups and brands. She was the first employee and operations director there and was responsible for managing end to end programmes.
She also ran a Sirius Programme arm- an accelerator, funded and run by the UK government, to bring global start up talent to the UK.

Anisah most recently joined the team of Backstage Capital to run their London accelerator.


Anisha Osman Britton

Anisah Osman Britton | 23 Code Street

Anisha Osman Britton

Anisah Osman Britton decided she wasn’t going to try for a place at Oxbridge (oxford/Cambridge), and instead was going to intern at businesses around the world with the goal of doing something "businessy".

Since then, she has been part of the tech scene for 5 years which began with her starting a company at 19. This was a student freelance company called Pocketmuni that won her the title of Young Entrepreneur of the Year by the IPA and took her to number 10 as part of the Start Up Games in 2012. This is when she began teaching herself how to code. After losing her developer, she understood the importance of understanding the possibilities, your IP, and being able to have conversations within the tech scene at an appropriate level.

She then went on to work for The Bakery, an open innovation accelerator, working with some of the best and upcoming start ups and the world's biggest brands. After seeing the inequality, lack of diversity and need to have more women have a technical understanding, Anisah founded 23 Code Street.

23 Code Street is a coding school for women based in London. For every paying student in the UK, they teach digital skills to a woman in the slums of Mumbai.

Anisah believes diversity breeds inclusive and accessible innovation. With a workforce that represents our society, we will build for everyone.

She is a big believer that learning how to code doesn’t mean you have to, or want to, become a developer and that we need to educate on the opportunities and possibilities that tech skills bring in other industries and jobs.

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