Listen to our latest She Talks Tech podcast on 'How AWS is helping retailers achieve their sustainability goals' with Chara Gravani, AWS

She Talks Tech podcast - How AWS is helping retailers achieve their sustainability goals' with Chara Gravani, AWS 1

This episode is the third of an AWS special series of the She Talks Tech podcast.

The objective of these podcasts is to demonstrate how Cloud technology is helping transform many industries like Retail, Financial Services or even Sports. But we also want to hear from the women behind these stories who are enabling these transformations to understand what they do day to day and how they got into working in technology.

In this episode, Chara, Senior Solutions Architect at AWS is here to talk about How AWS is helping retailers achieve their sustainability goals.

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‘She Talks Tech’ brings you stories, lessons and tips from some of the most inspirational women (and men!) in tech.

From robotics and drones, to fintech, neurodiversity and coronavirus apps; these incredible speakers are opening up to give us the latest information on tech in 2021.

Vanessa Valleley OBE, founder of WeAreTheCity and WeAreTechWomen brings you this latest resource to help you rise to the top of the tech industry. Women in tech make up just 17 per cent of the industry in the UK and we want to inspire that to change.

WeAreTechWomen are delighted to bring this very inspiring first series to wherever you normally listen to podcasts!

So subscribe, rate the podcast and give it a 5-star review – and keep listening every Wednesday morning for a new episode of ‘She Talks Tech’.

Produced by Pineapple Audio Production.

Discover more from our
She Talks Tech podcast

LISTEN HERE

She Talks Tech podcast, Working with Data in Financial Services' with Shafreen Sayyed & Sara Mitchell, AWS 1

Listen to our latest She Talks Tech podcast on 'Working with Data in Financial Services' with Shafreen Sayyed & Sara Mitchell, AWS

She Talks Tech podcast, Working with Data in Financial Services' with Shafreen Sayyed & Sara Mitchell, AWS 1

This episode is the second of an AWS special series of the She Talks Tech podcast.

The objective of these podcasts is to demonstrate how Cloud technology is helping transform many industries like Retail, Financial Services or even Sports. But we also want to hear from the women behind these stories who are enabling these transformations to understand what they do day to day and how they got into working in technology.

In this episode, Shafreen, Senior Solutions Architect, AWS and Sara, Senior Manager, AWS, will share you their story about “Working with Data in Financial Services”.

LISTEN HERE

‘She Talks Tech’ brings you stories, lessons and tips from some of the most inspirational women (and men!) in tech.

From robotics and drones, to fintech, neurodiversity and coronavirus apps; these incredible speakers are opening up to give us the latest information on tech in 2021.

Vanessa Valleley OBE, founder of WeAreTheCity and WeAreTechWomen brings you this latest resource to help you rise to the top of the tech industry. Women in tech make up just 17 per cent of the industry in the UK and we want to inspire that to change.

WeAreTechWomen are delighted to bring this very inspiring first series to wherever you normally listen to podcasts!

So subscribe, rate the podcast and give it a 5-star review – and keep listening every Wednesday morning for a new episode of ‘She Talks Tech’.

Produced by Pineapple Audio Production.

Discover more from our
She Talks Tech podcast

LISTEN HERE

She Talks Tech Podcast, Episode 8

Listen to our latest She Talks Tech podcast on 'How Cloud technology helps Football Clubs connect with their fan base through the pandemic and beyond' with Marthe Boulleau, AWS

She Talks Tech Podcast, Episode 8

This episode is the first of an AWS special series of the She Talks Tech podcast.

The objective of these podcasts is to demonstrate how Cloud technology is helping transform many industries like Retail, Financial Services or even Sports. But we also want to hear from the women behind these stories who are enabling these transformations to understand what they do day to day and how they got into working in technology.

In this episode, Marthe, Solutions Architect at AWS is here to talk about How Cloud technology helped Football Clubs connect with their fan base through the pandemic.

LISTEN HERE

‘She Talks Tech’ brings you stories, lessons and tips from some of the most inspirational women (and men!) in tech.

From robotics and drones, to fintech, neurodiversity and coronavirus apps; these incredible speakers are opening up to give us the latest information on tech in 2021.

Vanessa Valleley OBE, founder of WeAreTheCity and WeAreTechWomen brings you this latest resource to help you rise to the top of the tech industry. Women in tech make up just 17 per cent of the industry in the UK and we want to inspire that to change.

WeAreTechWomen are delighted to bring this very inspiring first series to wherever you normally listen to podcasts!

So subscribe, rate the podcast and give it a 5-star review – and keep listening every Wednesday morning for a new episode of ‘She Talks Tech’.

Produced by Pineapple Audio Production.

Discover more from our
She Talks Tech podcast

LISTEN HERE

Aisha Suleiman

Aisha Suleiman | Amazon Web Services

Aisha Suleiman

As an Education Program Manager for Amazon Web Services, Aisha guides educational institutions in EMEA through the journey of teaching cloud computing skills using the AWS Educate Program.

The cloud computing industry grows each year and at the same time, the skills gap continues to grow, creating additional demand for students to learn foundational cloud concepts.

This year she launched the AWS Educate Challenge, an inter-university challenge where students from universities across the UK and Ireland will compete to win prizes while building their cloud computing skills.

Aisha is also the Founder and Chair of the Amazon's Black Employee Network (BEN) in the UK. BEN supports Amazon with diversity and inclusion by championing the diverse perspectives of people of African and Caribbean descent and providing a support network for black employees at Amazon. Since BEN's launch in 2017, Amazon UK celebrates Black History Month yearly, a mentoring program for students from black and ethnic minority backgrounds has been launched as well as the first virtual conference on race and ethnicity in Europe.

Aisha is the Founder of The World in Her Words, a website which shares strategies for succeeding as a career woman in today's world.


Suzie-Miller-Amazon-featured

Inspirational Woman: Suzie Miller | Solutions Architect, Amazon Web Services

 

Suzie Miller Amazon

Suzie Miller is a Solutions Architect for Amazon Web Services (AWS) and Chair of the company’s People With Disabilities employee affinity group in the UK.

People With Disabilities supports Amazon employees with disabilities, allies and carers – by raising awareness, supporting career development, participating in community outreach and improving accessibility both for Amazonians and their customers.

Tell us a bit about yourself, your background and your current role

In my day-to-day role, I’m a Solutions Architect for Amazon Web Services (AWS) – a varied role that involves helping companies with their web service journey and cloud adoption. We help companies to design the right web architecture for their business, so they can focus on building incredible products.

I am also proud to be Chair of People With Disabilities (PWD) for Amazon in the UK, an employee-run affinity group that is focused on helping both employees and customers with awareness, accessibility and career aspirations.

Did you ever plan out your career in advance?

I’ll confess: the first time I used the internet was at a university open day in London, when I used AltaVista to search for Eddie Izzard! I could pretend that the heavens shone a light down in that moment to show a bright future ahead of me – but that isn’t completely true.

Due to a mix of different health problems, I couldn’t always study properly and that meant I failed my maths A Level and parts of my degree. I wanted to do Robotics at university, but I ended up studying Software Engineering because I had enjoyed programming in my GCSE and A Levels.

The dotcom bubble then conspired to burst just as I graduated, which made it much harder to find entry-level jobs, but I managed to get a job running Windows desktop support. At the time, I was hopeful that the tech industry would recover – and so it did!

So there was no planning, but a lot of determination and opportunism. Living with disabilities, I had to jump from contract to contract looking for flexibility that would accommodate my mobility and health. Throughout that early period of my career, I didn’t feel confident enough to request flexibility and I was living with conditions that weren’t even diagnosed, so it was near-impossible to justify a request for extra support.

What challenges have you faced along the way?

All things considered, it’s been a pretty bumpy journey. A mix of different health problems, such as chronic fatigue syndrome, meant I couldn’t study or attend lectures. This meant I graduated after the rest of my year – but I got there in the end.

There have also been problems with some managers in previous companies I worked at relating to inclusion: not only with my chronic fatigue and autism, among other things, but also as a member of the LGBT+ community.

I am also very conscious of the fact I may not be able to work in the future. I have a condition called Ehlers Danlos Syndrome (hEDS) which impacts my joints and causes a lot of pain, dislocations and other symptoms, which can make working difficult in lots of ways.

At AWS specifically, I have found my feet thanks to the ‘Day 1’ culture, and the way anyone can submit a narrative to drive changes within the company. I’ve also found so many people dedicated to driving accessibility and inclusive design who have taught me so much, but that has also made me more confident that my peculiar strengths would be appreciated. That’s why I felt comfortable enough to self-declare to HR and my manager, and it led me to establish AmazonPWD in the UK in order to help others.

How do you feel about mentoring? Have you mentored anyone or are you someone’s mentee?

A few years back, when struggling physically with 80-hour working weeks mostly from home in a previous company, I worked with a brilliant coach who helped me to take a step back. With her support, I realised that I wasn’t struggling with the nature of the work, rather it was the culture and industry that wasn’t working for me. We put together a plan to stop doing roles with on-call and out-of-hours demands, which set me on a path to be a Solutions Architect working across a range of different industries.

Although I have never worked with a mentor formally, I had some brilliant managers who took the time to understand my peculiarities and who recognised my strengths – even when I was struggling to see my own strengths!

Outside of work, I volunteer as an Independent Visitor through a government programme that matches adult volunteers with young people in care. As volunteers, we’re there to build long-term friendships and we’re truly ‘independent’, operating outside of the care system and giving that young person much-needed continuity.

When it comes to diversity, what do you want to see happen within the next five years to move things forward?

It’s now well-established that diversity is not only important for companies, it’s also good for their bottom line because diversity of thought drives innovation and creativity.

Personally I would highlight the importance of ‘inclusion’ as a concept. When businesses invest significantly to recruit a technical specialist, it’s illogical to manage that talent as it if it were a resource on a spreadsheet without a unique personality and a unique set of needs. Giving people space to be themselves will always maximise their talent. ‘Inclusion’ means more than meeting diversity targets – it’s about getting the most out of your talent. And it doesn’t just apply to disabled people, women or members of LGBT+ and BAME communities, in fact it’s vital for those groups that we avoid accusations of ‘special treatment’ by working towards inclusion for all.

In reality, everybody will need support in their life: either through a disability or long-term sickness, or by acting as a parent or carer, or by going through a bereavement or divorce. You never know what’s around the corner, so having a safety net at work is vital.

What has been your biggest achievement to date?

Unfortunately, many NDAs over the years mean I can’t be too specific! But I will say that through various projects I have saved millions of pounds of wasted expenditure and helped to stop major outages that my colleagues had not spotted.

Living with dyslexia and autism, I often see things that other people miss, or I think of solutions that are a bit unconventional. It’s been a pleasure to apply that unconventional thinking within my profession.

I have also been privileged to work with some amazing people who have supported Amazon’s PWD group, which has led to so many great opportunities that we’re now putting into action.

What is your next challenge and what are you hoping to achieve in the future?

I’m super excited to see how Amazon Web Services grows through the exciting and creative way that customers put our ‘building blocks’ into action.

In general, I’m excited to see how the tech industry builds on the huge developments of the last 20 years – particularly through the focus on collaborative working practices, which can only be a good thing for the industry.

I also want to be a disability advocate, both within Amazon and for our customers, by championing the importance of inclusive design and accessibility. And I want to go beyond accessibility of products and services to make working practices fully inclusive and considerate of disabled users.

What are the biggest challenges within improving disability rights at work and how can we tackle them?

According to Scope, 19 per cent of working-age adults are disabled and over 3.4 million disabled people are in employment. So if organisations are not creating an inclusive and accessible workplace, they are missing out on unique expertise and diverse perspectives that will enable them to better serve the millions of disabled customers out there.

Accessibility is not just about access ramps and dropped kerbs, it’s about aspiring to design products and processes in the most inclusive way possible.

Organisations also need easy and transparent mechanisms to request special accommodations and support, including flexi-time, desk adjustments and extra software. These need to be streamlined and available from the first point of contact.

Although as a society we’re making great strides forward, I also know that those living with disabilities do not always feel comfortable declaring their conditions – in fact they may not even be diagnosed, or they may not consider themselves disabled. The fear of unconscious bias and stigma is very real, so clearly signposting support in areas like mental health is vital.

Where can organisations find further support in this area?

Charities such as Scope or Mind’s ‘Time to Change’ programme can be invaluable in supporting disabled colleagues while raising awareness and providing recommendations. The government’s Access to Work scheme is also a good port of call and helps businesses to cover the costs around accommodations.

Across a large organisation, taking part in national events such as Worlds Aids Day on the December 1st or the UN’s International Day of Persons with Disabilities on December 3rd can be really beneficial. I also love PurpleSpace and their #PurpleLightUp campaign.

Exposing senior leadership and junior colleagues to conversations around the challenges faced by disabled people is another great way to reduce discrimination and unconscious bias.

Anyone can become disabled at any time, so businesses shouldn’t risk losing valued members of staff because of perceived negative stereotypes or a lack of inclusivity frameworks. This kind of support is not only the right thing to do, it also boosts productivity and spreads a positive message to the next generation of professionals that being in the minority should not put a limit on your career aspirations.


Kate Koehn featured

Inspirational Woman: Kate Koehn | Program Manager, Amazon Web Services

Kate KoehnKate Koehn successfully retrained as a Program Manager for Amazon Web Services.

Despite her love from a young age for the scale, ambition and complexity of engineering, Kate had assumed that a technical role would be too difficult for her to access. But after working in recruitment and teaching, Kate has flourished in her current role at Amazon – thanks in no small part to a supportive working environment, a natural passion for technology and a flair for building professional relationships.

Kate Koehn is based in Seattle as a Program Manager for S3 Index, Amazon Web Services, where she is responsible for driving programmes for capacity management. Kate is passionate about technology, engineering, automation – and she loves to bake.

Tell us a bit about yourself, background and your current role

In my current role, I’m responsible for driving programmes to scale server capacity to stay ahead of customer demand for data storage on the Cloud. However, my career started out very differently. I studied psychology and then taught English in France, before working in restaurants and even a motorbike repair shop. I always had a passion for maths and engineering – in fact I used to do my friends’ maths tests for fun and with help I re-built my own scooter engine – but I had assumed that a career in tech or engineering would not be accessible for somebody like me because I didn’t have the degree or the experience.

Thankfully I was wrong about that – and I love my job at Amazon. Working closely with a fantastic team of innovators and builders gives me energy every day, and I’m excited to see how far I can progress within the company.

Tell us about how you retrained into your current role.

I started out as a recruitment co-ordinator for Amazon, so I was working closely with engineering teams in Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3) to support their resourcing needs. I knew this wasn’t a job I wanted to be doing long term when I took it, but it was a foot in the door and it meant I was constantly in touch with specialist teams doing exactly the kind of job I had dreamed of.

Over time, I knew that Amazon S3 was where I wanted to be. Thanks to my time in recruiting, I had a desk in the office of the Senior Manager of Engineering for Amazon S3. Listening in on their meetings, I was fascinated by the scale, responsiveness and complexity of the challenges when working on a distributed system as large as Amazon S3. I still didn’t know exactly how I could be there given that I didn’t have any technical training – so I asked!

Eventually I was able to apply for a position as a Programme Manager where I could demonstrate my passion for technology while also identifying which additional skills I might need. I knew this role was a step in the right direction, but not the long-term goal. Again, I made my desired career goals known to management, and shortly thereafter I transitioned into my current Technical Programme Management role. Outside work, I’m also studying Computer Science and getting a certificate in Python programming which has given me the fundamentals in key areas – that’s taken about 18 months to complete, and I’m nearly there!

For anybody who is looking to retrain but doesn’t know where to start, I would say that it requires perseverance, broad industry knowledge and a clear idea of what you want. If you don’t have a clear idea of what you want, take some time to research careers that speak to you. There is nothing wrong with saying to your manager or senior contacts in a different department, ‘I want to work for your team, but I don’t have the right credentials – how do I make this happen?’ After that, it’s about getting the right skills through continuous learning and a long-term approach to career planning.

Did you ever sit down and plan your career?

Not initially, no! However, I now have a much clearer idea of where I want to go and there are clearly defined career paths for me within Amazon should I choose to pursue them. One of the benefits of working for Amazon is that it is a bit like a ‘choose your own adventure’ book.

What has been the biggest challenge in your career?

The biggest challenge so far has been staying focused and being extra judicious about where I spend my time and energy. Coming from a non-tech background, there is a lot of information I don’t know. The more I learn, the more I discover how much I don’t know. It is very easy to try to go down all the rabbit holes of unknown information that exist at every turn in this complex industry, and get completely overwhelmed by the volume of things to learn. No one in this industry knows everything, and it’s important to remember that and focus on learning the things that matter to be able to do my job well. After I’m done with my current course, I’ll spend more time in those rabbit holes for fun.

What has been your biggest achievement to date?

I’m really proud of my career to date and I consider that progress a huge achievement. I want to continue to take on new challenges, solving problems and facing situations that I’ve never encountered before.

What one thing do you believe has been a major factor in you achieving success?

Those early experiences in different industries really helped to develop my transferable skills. Working in recruitment for Amazon also meant I understood the bigger picture. In hindsight it was a privileged position that allowed me to watch and learn before getting involved myself.

In general, I love making colleagues’ lives easier, supporting them every day and showing my value within the organisation. I think that quality has been invaluable so far and will continue to be important throughout my development.

In terms of transferable skills, being able to build and maintain positive working relationships has been a key theme. I’m really lucky to work within a collaborative, inclusive culture at Amazon where colleagues understand the benefits of sharing their ‘tribal knowledge’.

How do you feel about mentoring? Have you mentored anyone or are you someone’s mentee?

I currently run two mentoring programmes at Amazon. We hold tech talks, build networks and provide mentoring both formally and informally. I also mentor a few people from recruiting who are looking to make a similar career jump to mine, and I really enjoy helping others navigate our culture and internal relationships.

In my opinion, Amazon does mentoring brilliantly. Sharing ‘tribal knowledge’ is second nature – all you have to do is ask, be considerate and set some time aside if you have a particular question. I’ve always found that colleagues are excited to tell you what they know because it improves the entire business. This is the reason why in addition to my official mentor, I have several unofficial mentors. Mentoring also plays an important role in helping identify gaps in my own knowledge and thinking about ways to fill them.

If you could give one piece of advice to your younger self what would it be?

In hindsight I would have studied for a technical role from the outset. I would tell myself to believe that I was smart enough to pursue a technical career!

I would also have looked for more inspirational role models and examples of women working in technology, which is partly why I want to help promote the accessibility of these roles to other women and girls who are interested in tech careers but may not know where to being.

What is your next challenge and what are you hoping to achieve in the future?

Amazon never ceases to surprise you with new opportunities, so you never know!

In general, I want to make as much of my day-to-day role as productive as possible, and then move on to the next layer of challenges. I’m already in the process of automating aspects of our capacity management so engineers are less reliant on me and better able to access quick tools that save time and energy.

Further down the line, I want to help engineering teams deliver invaluable features by embedding with software development teams and getting a detailed understanding of their challenges – and the potential solutions we could provide.

Outside of my own career, I’m passionate about promoting tech roles to women and girls. Although colleges in my native USA, for example, are now seeing more women than men entering STEM degrees at undergraduate level, the gender imbalance across the industry globally is still pronounced. At Amazon we understand the link between diversity, inclusion and innovation – which is why I was pleased to see the company launch Amazon Amplify in the UK which is a series of initiatives designed to further increase the number of women in technology and innovation roles across our UK business.


Ramat Tejani

Ramat Tejani | Amazon Web Services

Ramat Tejani

Ramat is passionate about empowering individuals and businesses to tell stories that make a difference and inspire action.

Her experience across a variety of sectors including recruitment, charity, design and technology; has helped her developed a unique understanding of the best way to tell stories.

Ramat currently leads Amazon Web Services AWS GetIT programme, a social initiative designed to inspire more young people, in particular girls, to consider a career in technology. The programme also works to empower current female technology talent to use their voices as diversity advocates within the tech industry. Prior to joining AWS, Ramat worked as a Marketing Manager at the GSMA. Whilst there she on top of her day-to-day responsibilities she also led a team to support the ITU (a United Nations agency) in their International Girls in ICT Day initiative. Working in a trade association, Ramat saw an opportunity for the GSMA to lead by example and show the telecommunications industry how to encourage not just women but the next generation of young girls who have yet to consider ICT or who would like to have more exposure to it. In total, over 15 internal and external stakeholders worked on the day to impact the lives of 546 girls across 7 global sites. Earlier this year Ramat was shortlisted for the Women in Tech award for the e-skills initiative of the year award as recognition of her efforts.

Outside of her day job, Ramat is a keen advocate of women empowerment and is a freelance career coach. In this capacity, she uses her personal experiences to motivate and guide women through their career transitions and progressions. Ramat is also the founder of “The Inspiration Box”, a platform creating online and offline spaces that ignite curiosity within people and reminds individuals that the possibilities in life are endless.
In 2018, Ramat was named as a Future Leader by Women in Advertising and Communications London (WACL), an award recognising female pioneers in the marketing industry. In the same year, she was also awarded the WeAreTheCity Rising Star Award for PR, Marketing and Communication.

Ramat holds a BA (Hons) in International Business from the University of Hertfordshire and an MSc in Consultancy and Organisational Change from Birkbeck, University of London.

To find out more about Ramat's work on The Inspiration Box visit: https://www.theinspirationbox.com/


learning on the job, retraining, woman on computer

Looking to retrain in a technical role? Here’s how Kate Koehn from Amazon Web Services did it

learning on the job, retraining, woman on computerBy Kate Koehn, Program Manager, Amazon Web Services

Opportunities for women to retrain in the technology and innovation industries are a top priority for government, businesses and the education sector.

Recent research from WISE, in partnership with Amazon, surveyed 1,000 women working in STEM and found that a 10 per cent increase of women in STEM careers would lead to a £3bn boost to the UK economy. Women in innovation and tech roles were also found to earn £11,000 more per year on average.

But this work to address the gender balance in the technology industry by appealing to more women and girls is not just about graduates and undergraduates.

With personal experience of retraining into a technical role, my message is that it’s never too late to retrain.

A few years ago, I was waiting tables and answering phones at a motorbike repair shop, but I’m now working as a Program Manager for Amazon Web Services (AWS), a job I love and enjoy immensely.

That means I work every day to drive programmes that scale server capacity to stay ahead of customer demand for data storage on the cloud.

So how did I unlock this opportunity to retrain into a technical role with Amazon, and what advice would I give to other women who want to retrain but might not know where to start?

All your other experiences still matter 

I took an unusual route into my current role, initialling studying psychology at university before working in a variety of jobs, including restaurants, a motorbike repair shop, teaching and recruitment. Although I always loved the scale, ambition and complexity of engineering, you might say that the residual bias of youth had affected me. Without the positive role models and the availability of career paths, I had assumed that I wasn’t smart enough to be part of the tech world.

However, looking back I can’t discount the value of those early experiences. All of those roles taught me something new – interpersonal skills, technical knowledge, problem-solving, professional networks. You cannot disregard that experience as irrelevant because it all counts towards your personal and professional growth. It made me the person I am today.

No matter which kind of technical role you enter, an ability to manage, delegate, communicate and build relationships will always benefit your career.

Lean on your employer for support

Working with a supportive employer has been invaluable. Amazon have been fantastic in supporting me with formal and informal training, lots of different learning opportunities and the time I needed to improve my skills.

I initially started as a recruitment co-ordinator with Amazon. I knew that role wasn’t what I wanted to be doing long-term, but it was a foot in the door which allowed me to work closely with engineering teams, to develop my understanding of how AWS works, and build networks internally.

The next challenge was arguably the hardest: how to bridge the gap in my technical knowledge by building my own skills? I decided to enrol in Computer Science and Python programming courses, and with support from Amazon, carved out the time to study. Those courses gave me the fundamentals in key areas, including a certification in Python programming, and it’s taken about 18 months to complete.

Amazon is also able to offer formal and informal retraining opportunities. For example, its new Amazon Amplify programme in the UK was launched to help further increase the number of women in technology and innovation roles across our UK business. Through Amazon Amplify, its degree apprenticeship programme, AWS (Amazon Web Services) Return to Work programme, in-work training and a new UK-wide interactive training programme all help to build confidence and personal skills.

Beyond that, you have to be prepared to learn on the job. I find it helps to understand that everybody else is learning on the job as well, even if they have a background in your chosen area.

Ask the right questions – and keep asking

In a supportive work environment, it’s totally acceptable to say: ‘I want to work for your team, but I don’t have the right credentials – how do I make this happen?’

I had a clear idea in my mind of which role I wanted within Amazon. During discussions, I was offered other roles – including an Executive Assistant position – but I knew that wasn’t the right step for me personally. By giving a clear impression of what I wanted, my managers knew that I understood the role and would be able to learn on the job.

Within those conversations, make sure to communicate your understanding of the company culture and demonstrate your interest in developing technical skills. Take the time to learn about similar roles and the other specialists that you will come into contact with, so you understand the bigger picture and can speak the right language.

Kate KoehnAbout the author

Kate Koehn is based in Seattle as a Program Manager for S3 Index, Amazon Web Services, where she is responsible for driving programmes for capacity management. Kate is passionate about technology, engineering, automation – and she loves to bake.