Flavilla Fongang featured

Inspirational Woman: Flavilla Fongang | Founder, 3 Colours Rule & TLA Black Women In Tech

Flavilla Fongang

Flavilla Fongang is a serial entrepreneur, author and the founder of 3 Colours Rule, an award-winning branding and neuromarketing agency.

Computer Weekly named her among the top 5 most influential women in tech in the UK. Through her agency, she has helped her clients scale their brand nationally and internationally. She was awarded the “She’s Mercedes” businesswoman award by Mercedes Benz. Flavilla Fongang is a respected brand strategist with neuromarketing expertise and the creator of the D.A.C. system and The “Beyond marketing” strategy. Flavilla is the brand advisor for the BBC and provides regularly actionable brand strategy advice on live radio and TV. She is also the founder of Tech London Advocates for Black Women in Tech.  She hosts Tech Brains Talk podcast providing insights and advice to tech entrepreneurs and companies. She is also the author of “99 strategies to get customers”.

She has been a keynote speaker for the most prestigious international events, such as AdWeek, HubSpot, DMWF, MozCon, AdWorld, Upgrade100, CTA, MarTech and many more.

Tell us a bit about yourself, background and your current role

I run an award-winning branding and neuromarketing agency called 3 Colours Rule. I was named by Computer Weekly named the top 5 most influential women in tech in the UK. Through my agency, I help clients scale their brand nationally and internationally. I was awarded the “She’s Mercedes” businesswoman award by Mercedes Benz. I’m a brand strategist with neuromarketing expertise and the creator of the D.A.C. system and The “Beyond marketing” strategy. I’m the brand advisor for the BBC and provided regularly actionable brand strategy advice on live radio and TV. I was also the founder of Tech London Advocates for Black Women in Tech.  I host Tech Brains Talk podcast providing insights and advice to tech entrepreneurs and companies. I’m also the author of “99 strategies to get customers”.

I have been a keynote speaker for the most prestigious international events, such as AdWeek, HubSpot, DMWF, MozCon, AdWorld, Upgrade100, CTA, MarTech and many more.

Did you ever sit down and plan your career?

Not really, I must say, lol. The only thing I wanted from my career was creativity, excitement and impact. I’m really happy with this so far.

Have you faced any career challenges along the way and how did you overcome these?

Oh yes many! Opportunities were often given to the same people, so I decided to create my own opportunities. When they didn’t give me a seat at the table, I made my own table and brought the right people around me. As the women in a men’s world, my imposter syndrome used to kick in, but I now remind myself that I’m a Queen, the most piece of a chess board. If there isn’t like me in the room, I’m essential,

What has been your biggest career achievement to date?

I’m so lucky to have achieved so many amazing things. I’m really proud of creating Tech London Advocates Black Women in Tech. TLA Black Women has become bigger than me with Black women and allies around the world who have been able to connect. I’m so happy to have created a network where Black women can recognise themselves, feel valued, be themselves and no longer feel alone. That is important to me.

What one thing do you believe has been a major factor in you achieving success?

I’m fearless which means if I want to do something. I do it. I embrace fear and move forward. I remind myself that fear is a liar that will prevent me to take risks in life. My biggest achievements have been achieved by not worrying about what others think of me, trust myself and doing it.

What top tips would you give to an individual who is trying to excel in their career in technology?

If you are requested to do a task, always go beyond, always exceed expectations. It’s okay if people underestimate you, surprise them.

Do you believe there are still barriers for success for women working in tech, if so, how can these barriers be overcome?

Oh yes, many barriers and unfortunately there are invisible. We are now we seeing more and more allies understanding that we, as minorities, can’t fight these disparities alone. To overcome we need to carry on highlighting the work women have done so we can change the narrative and aspire young girls to believe in themselves.

What do you think companies can do to support to progress the careers of women working in technology?

We need more leaders within businesses supporting women to give them the experience and the know-how to progress within their career. We need to create working environments that don’t require women to choose between their children and their career.  We need more allies, especially more white men at the top, to champion change as they hold the power.

There is currently only 17 per cent of women working in tech, if you could wave a magic wand, what is the one thing you would do to accelerate the pace of change for women in the industry?

Wake up anyone who isn’t aware of their privilege so they think about hiring or promoting women as a necessity.

What resources do you recommend for women working in tech?

I recommend listening to my podcast, Tech Brains Talk to hear wise advice and amazing strategies from great entrepreneurs. My favourite app is blinkist, to discover summary audio books. I invite everyone to discover TLA Black Women in Tech who welcome Black women and allies. I also recommend reading 15 minutes per day. I love this book: Never Spilt The Difference.


WeAreTechWomen has a back catalogue of thousands of Inspirational Woman interviews, including Professor Sue Black OBE, Debbie Forster MBE, Jacqueline de Rojas CBE, Dr Anne-Marie Imafidon MBE and many more. You can read about all our amazing women here