Marie Curie featured

Inspirational Quotes: Marie Curie | Physicist, Chemist & Pioneer in the study of radiation

Marie Curie featuredMarie Curie is remembered for her discovery of radium and polonium, and her huge contribution to the fight against cancer.

After her mother died and her father could no longer support her she became a governess, reading and studying in her own time to quench her thirst for knowledge. She never lost this passion.

Her sister offered her lodgings in Paris with a view to going to university, she grasped the opportunity and moved to France in 1891.

She immediately entered Sorbonne University in Paris where she read physics and mathematics – she had naturally discovered a love of the subjects through her insatiable appetite for learning.

It was in Paris, in 1894, that she met Pierre Curie – a scientist working in the city – and who she married a year later.

The Curies became research workers at the School of Chemistry and Physics in Paris and there they began their pioneering work into invisible rays given off by uranium – a new phenomenon which had recently been discovered by Professor Henri Becquerel.

In 1903 Marie and Pierre were awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics jointly with Henri Becquerel for their combined, though separate, work on radioactivity. In the same year, Marie passed her doctorate thesis in Physics.

When World War I broke out in 1914, Curie suspended her research and organized a fleet of mobile X-ray machines for doctors on the front.

After the war, she worked hard to raise money for her Radium Institute. But by 1920, she was experiencing health problems, likely because of her exposure to radioactive materials. On July 4, 1934, Curie died of aplastic anemia — a condition that occurs when bone marrow fails to produce new blood cells.

Curie was buried next to her husband in Sceaux, a commune in southern Paris. But in 1995, their remains were moved and interred in the Pantheon in Paris alongside France's greatest citizens. The Curies received another honor in 1944 when the 96th element on the periodic table of elements was discovered and named "curium."

Below, we look at some of Marie Curie's most inspirational quotes:


"Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and above all confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something and that this thing must be attained."

"Nothing in life is to be feared, it is only to be understood. Now is the time to understand more, so that we may fear less."

"One never notices what has been done; one can only see what remains to be done."

"A scientist in his laboratory is not a mere technician: he is also a child confronting natural phenomena that impress him as though they were fairy tales."

"Be less curious about people and more curious about ideas."

"I was taught that the way of progress was neither swift nor easy."

"There are sadistic scientists who hurry to hunt down errors instead of establishing the truth."

"It is my earnest desire that some of you should carry on this scientific work and keep for your ambition the determination to make a permanent contribution to science."

"I am one of those who think like Nobel, that humanity will draw more good than evil from new discoveries."

"I have frequently been questioned, especially by women, of how I could reconcile family life with a scientific career. Well, it has not been easy."

"All my life through, the new sights of Nature made me rejoice like a child."

"You cannot hope to build a better world without improving the individuals. To that end each of us must work for his own improvement, and at the same time share a general responsibility for all humanity, our particular duty being to aid those to whom we think we can be most useful."

"I am among those who think that science has great beauty."


Marie Curie featured

The Curie-ous Case of the STEM Diversity Gap

 

On 7 November 1867 Marie Curie was born. She is widely considered to be one of the most outstanding women in the history of science.
Marie Curie
Marie Curie provided by Shutterstock.com

She was the first person, and a woman for that matter, to win two Nobel Prizes. Marie’s work broke barriers not only in physics and chemistry but also for her gender, cementing the idea that women should very much have their equal place in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). Why then, a century after her accolades, is the gender gap in STEM still so prevalent?

In the UK, Tech Nation found that men outnumber women by a ratio of three to one within the technology sector.In the US, women make up 48 per cent of the workface – and yet, within STEM, only 24 per cent of employees are female. Despite progression in gender quality, women are still grossly underrepresented in STEM. These low levels of participation can be traced back all the way to the school years, where a number of influences from society and culture, education and the labour market are all at play.

Science and prejudice

Women have long faced trials when entering jobs that are seen as ‘for men’ – from directors all the way to the Supreme Court. Let’s face it, STEM compromises mainly of white males. People tend to hire people they feel they relate to and identify with. This unconscious bias can foster negative attitudes and lead to damaging stereotypical behaviours. These behaviours can negatively affect the education, hiring, promotion, and retention of women in STEM.

It doesn’t help that there are those who believe that women are not well matched to STEM in general.  Just look at James Damore’s Google manifesto. He still has the old fashioned attitude that women are better suited to social and artistic careers; that they would struggle with making controversial leadership decisions and that they are neurotic and can’t handle stress. Without realising, many men carry these views subconsciously, and – with most STEM decision makers being white, middle aged men – this can influence whom they hire or promote. It is the same reason why holding blind auditions for orchestras increases women’s chances of advancing to the final round by 30 per cent.

However, it’s not only men that believe this. Some women, too, feel that men suit STEM more than they do.  This is why there are so many programmes aimed at getting girls interested in these areas. These on-going drives are trying to eradicate and challenge old fashioned view points held by parents and teachers alike, that girls are less likely to want be involved in STEM career paths – or that they will find it too tough.

Men have a very important role to play in narrowing the gender gap. Invariably they are in the seat of the interviewer, and they need to be encouraged, trained and in some cases forced to create diverse teams. They need training in conscious and unconscious bias, and need to be educated about the benefits of diversity.

Equality within the sector

If there was ever a reason to assemble a diverse team, surely it is because your business will do better as a result? Companies in the top quartile for racial and ethnic diversity are 35 per cent more likely to have financial returns above their respective national industry medians, Forbes found. Additionally, a 2015 study from Bersin by Deloitte showed that diverse companies had 2.3 times higher cash flow per employee over a three-year period than non-diverse companies did.

Aside from this, the bottom line is that women are just as capable as men. People often ask, “Why should more women get into STEM?” It’s like asking why women should be doctors. These on-going drives to get women into science and technology will continue to happen until the question no longer needs to be asked.

Some women need to be persuaded to consider a career STEM. The opportunities for them in this industry are rife; it’s a growing trade with growing opportunities. But STEM companies need to make sure that they are promoting and paying women fairly. The stats would indicate that this might not be the case. For example, women comprise 20 per cent of engineering school graduates, but only 11 per cent of practicing engineers are women. There is a major drop off in the first ten years – women leave STEM jobs at a rate 45 per cent higher than men. It’s likely that gender bias plays a part here.

The UK has almost two million digital tech jobs, and between 2011 and 2015, the growth rate of digital jobs was more than double that of non-digital jobs. A lot of STEM jobs don’t exist yet.  In fact, Martin Boehm of IE University in Spain believes around 80 per cent per cent of jobs that will exist in 2025 don’t exist today.

Back to school

Encouraging women to get into STEM ultimately starts with education – from school to the boardroom. In school, coding should be mandatory for everyone; complex problem solving and critical thinking should be part of everyday life. When I was a child, we had computers around the house because my Dad was working with Digital in Ireland. I also remember all the Edward de Bono lateral thinking books we had. You will absorb what you are exposed to. As well as that, my Mum was an ardent feminist; she told her daughters they could do and be anything (and her son!). It was only when I started school that I realised people thought and told girls they couldn’t do things. Education and encouragement, fundamentally, is key to overhauling out-dated thinking.

In the workplace, training programmes can help people understand conscious and unconscious bias; both helping people to change the way they think, and call out unfair behaviour. Getting female talent into the industry is only half the story, however. Making sure they rise up the ranks is also key – with the support of women in leadership training programmes.

Overall, an attitude overhaul – for both women and men – is needed if we are to close the STEM gender gap. Through better education and encouragement of both genders, we can chip away at antiquated attitudes and create a more equal workplace.

About the author

This article was provided by Tara O’Sullivan, Chief Creative Officer at Skillsoft


Marie Curie featured

Inspirational Quotes: Marie Curie, Nobel Prize winning scientist

 

Marie Curie, born 1867, was a Polish physicist and chemist who was famous for her work in radioactivity.

Marie Curie
Marie Curie provided by Shutterstock.com

Throughout her life, Curie had many notable achievements. She was the first women to win a Nobel Prize; the first person and only woman to win the award twice; and the only person to win twice in multiple sciences.

She also founded the Curie Institutes, leading research centres, in Paris and Warsaw. During the First World War, Curie established the first military field radiological centres, meaning that mobile x-rays could be taken.

Curie died in 1934, aged 66 due to radiation poisoning from carrying around test tubes of radium in her pockets and coming into contact with radiation from x-ray machines.

Below you will find the best inspirational quotes from Marie Curie herself.


“Be less curious about people and more curious about ideas.”


“Have no fear of perfection; you’ll never reach it.”


“Nothing in life is to be feared; it is only to be understood. Now is the time to understand more, so that we may fear less.”


“I was taught that the way of progress was neither swift nor easy.”


“Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and above all confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something and that this thing must be attained.”


“You cannot hope to build a better world without improving the individuals.”


“You must never be fearful of what you are doing when it is right.”


“I have no dress except the one I wear every day. If you are going to be kind enough to give me one, please let it be practical and dark so that I can put it on afterwards to go to the laboratory.”


“One never notices what has been done; one can only see what remains to be done.”


“We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be attained.”


“First principle: never to let one’s self be beaten down by persons or by events.”


“Each of us must work for his own improvement, and at the same time share a general responsibility for all humanity.”


“I have frequently been questioned, especially by women, of how I could reconcile family life with a scientific career. Well, it has not been easy.”

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Marie Curie - Celebrating an Amazing Woman

Marie Curie is a lady synonymous with the area of science and in particular cancer research. An astounding and truly inspiring lady, she would be due to turn 147 this November. Born in Poland into an unassuming family, Marie Curie was determined to have a career defined by research even at an early stage. For a woman to show such determination in terms of her career at that particular time of the century is remarkable.

She moved to Paris to further her studies and it wasn’t without its challenges in terms of funding. However, this never halted the determination or tenacity of Marie Curie. Still today a hugely respected figure head in science worldwide, read more in this info-graphic about this woman who defined areas of science and learning and also learn how she made a name for herself even in the darkest of circumstance.

Source: http://www.homecareplus.ie/   

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