Young women in tech, Tech She Can

Could you help inspire the next generation? Film a role model video for Tech She Can & encourage women into tech

Young women in tech, Tech She Can

Could you help inspire the next generation of women in tech?

Tech She Can is launching a new ‘Young women in tech’ role model video campaign, in collaboration with Workfinder, DCMS, everywoman and ourselves at We Are Tech Women, as part of our shared aim to encourage more women into tech roles.

You could be a data analyst, data engineer, software developer, systems engineer, DevOps engineer, intelligence analyst, app developer, data scientist, VR or metaverse designer, privacy analyst, security architect, Natural Language Processing (NLP) engineer, Blockchain developer, UX designer, or Cloud engineer. This isn’t an exhaustive list, but hopefully gives you a good idea of the types of roles we’re looking to profile.

Watch the video below for guidance on filming your video

If you fit the brief and would  like to feature in this video series, share your story to inspire girls and young women to consider a future career in tech.

Full details on how to get involved, including detailed guidance on how to film and submit your videos can be found here.

The campaign will launch in early March 2022 but role model videos will continue to be added into the collection on an ongoing basis. If you’d like to be featured in the initial launch, please ensure your video reaches them as soon as possible.

One Tech World Virtual Conference 2022

01 APRIL 2022

Join Tech She Can at our One Tech World conference, where they’ll be talking about how to make technology work for everyone & how to get more girls into the industry.

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Women 6.0 | Being a Tech Role Model | A Morgan Stanley & WeAreTheCity event | In Words

Women across the technology sector gathered to join, celebrate and learn about becoming a tech role model during the Women 6.0 event last week.
Mona Niknafs, Technical Associate, Morgan Stanley - Talking Tech role models
Mona Niknafs, Technical Associate, Morgan Stanley - Talking Tech role models

For the fourth consecutive year, Morgan Stanley and WeAreTheCity presented an innovative event, which heard from inspiring speakers such as Maggie Philbin and the next generation of tech; as well as showcasing not-for-profit organisations supporting the growth of women entering the technology industry.

Opening the night, Vanessa Vallely, founder of WeAreTheCity said, “It is humbling to see so many women who want to give back to technology.”

Continuing Managing Director at Morgan Stanley, Gerard Hester said, “It is extremely inspiring to see so many female technologists passionate about shaping the pipeline of women coming into technology. Whether you feel comfortable speaking at a school assembly, running an after-school club, sharing expertise via Skype or mentoring a fellow female technologist, we hope to offer something for all aspiring role models tonight.”

Tech journalist, former presenter of Tomorrow’s World and CEO of TeenTech, Maggie Philbin inspired the audience with her own journey into the tech industry.

She said, “I loved science at school and I thought that being a vet was my only option – and in many instances young girls still face this today.”

“It doesn’t matter what age you are, you are potentially a role model who can make a difference. Never underestimate the difference you can make as an individual.”

Further highlighting the need to promote and encourage more women to become tech role models, three young speakers spoke about their personal need to have a female influence when pursuing technology.

Ella Rosa, 12, spoke of the need to have a more in-depth technology curriculum and to ‘hear from adults who have fun tech careers’. She also did not want to be the only girl in a classroom of boys. Mohima Ahmed, Imperial College Student and AppsForGood graduate, encouraged attendees to say, ‘so what if I’m a girl’.

She continued, “This is the kind of generation we are so close to building. If you are interested in something, you can continue to be so.”

Mona Niknafs, Technical Associate at Morgan Stanley spoke of the need to promote women into the technology sector and encourage mentoring among them. She said, “In my experience, having a mentor has been extremely beneficial and I think others in my position will appreciate having one to help find their unique path in technology. As the network grows, there will be more members and therefore more mentors and so our cycle can continue.”

Over the course of the evening, attendees were given the opportunity to learn about each enterprise’s initiative and how they could get involved or inspire others to pursue a career in technology. Amongst the organisations were Stemettes, AppsForGood, #techMums and Code Club.

To view all the photos from the Women 6.0 event, click here.

 


CompTIA brings Dream IT programme to UK to inspire girls and create role models

IT trade association CompTIA has brought its Dream IT initiative to UK shores, to create female role models within the tech industry and to promote careers in IT.

The not-for-profit launched the Dream IT programme in the US last year, offering free online resources to inspire young girls to take up careers in tech or to encourage women to switch careers or re-enter the job market. CompTIA claims the US programme is on track to reach 10,000 people this year.Professional-Woman-Careers-400x400

The programme provides ready-to-use presentations and seminars, along with resources for young women to learn about the opportunities a career in IT can offer. The materials are designed to equip role models with the tools needed to present within schools, colleges, universities and careers fares. Articles are included which demonstrate what a career in IT is like and what skills are needed to get started.

Speaking to WeAreTheCity at CompTIA’s recent EMEA Conference in London, Nancy Hammervik, Senior Vice President, Industry Relations at CompTIA, said: "Women are 51% of the population and 60% of graduates are females overall. We are doing the IT industry a great dis-service if we don’t encourage more women to join. Women have been known to be more creative, better leaders and are the primary household buyers – they should share a perspective on products before they go to market.”

"Unfortunately only 9% of girls say they have considered a career in IT, so we have a responsibility as an industry to share what roles in IT look like. You have to interface with technology in every industry, whether it’s fashion, medicine, if you run a restaurant or you’re a coder. We need to take away the fear to ensure tech isn’t seen as a chore."

“The other side of this is that we want the women who are already here to feel good about themselves, empowered and to be able to share that. It’s not just about the women – about 30% of our male members are now on the roster to support with women in IT initiatives.”

She added: “There is an appreciation and frustration from women in the industry who want to give back. They appreciate that they are not in an industry where they are going to be replaced or downgraded and they have a sense of frustration that not many know how great a career in IT can be.”

Estelle Johannes, Director, Member Communities UK at CompTIA, said: “We follow where the need is and we’ve been localising the presentations and the video to ensure it engages the right people. Before the launch there was already a group in the UK who expressed their interested in launching the programme over here.”

“The materials aim to show that there is a place in IT for everybody.”

Cathy Alper, Director, Member Communities US, CompTIA, said: “Ensuring that more women enter the IT industry is hugely important for diversity and helping address the industry-wide skills gap. Women are actually well suited for a career in IT, which requires all sorts of skills, not just programming. Women bring leadership and interpersonal skills, which are a benefit to the IT workplace. In fact last year, we found that 73% of female IT professionals believe that their jobs make good use of their skills.

“We’ve been working closely with our UK member community over the past year to develop these new materials that will help ensure that women and girls hear about the opportunities and benefits of a career in IT.”