WeAreTechWomen are proud to announce our 2022 TechWomen100 shortlist

WeAreTechWomen is extremely proud to announce the TechWomen100 shortlist for 2022!

Since July 2022, WeAreTechWomen has been searching the UK for the best female tech talent in the country. With the support of headline sponsor Barclays, WeAreTechWomen has now identified a shortlist of 200.

The TechWomen100 awards are the first of their kind to focus solely on the female tech talent pipeline and to also recognise the impact of champions, companies and networks that are leading the way for future generations of tech talent. Highlighting the achievements of these women is part of WeAreTechWomen’s campaign to shine a spotlight on 1,000 future female leaders in technology by 2025.

The shortlist showcases remarkable women within the technology and STEM sector, including Marie Hemingway, Founder and Chief Technology Officer at Speak Out Revolution, a not-for-profit with a mission to cancel the culture of silence on harassment in the workplace; Dayo Akinrinade, who built a social audio app to democratise access to mentorship and create a diverse community centred on knowledge sharing; Jessica Heagren, co-founder of That Works For Me, a platform that connects forward-thinking businesses with professional mums looking for flexible work; Priyanka Gangishetty, Senior Azure Customer Engineer at Microsoft and ambassador for women in STEM, aiming to show young girls from all backgrounds that you can achieve your dreams; and Dr Chun Huang, Senior Lecturer at Imperial College London and an award-winning innovator, working to reduce human impact on climate change.

The awards also recognise Champions, Networks and Companies, who are all actively supporting the progression of women in tech and STEM. The TechWomen100 awards also celebrate women in tech from outside the UK, in the Global Award for Achievement category.

The full shortlist includes individuals from leading firms such as Deloitte, KPMG, Santander, Amazon, Royal Air Force, Bloomberg, J.P. Morgan and many more.

Over the nomination period, we received over 1,000 nominations from across the UK and Northern Ireland. The calibre of entries for these awards was exceptional and all of the judges stated how difficult it was to arrive at the shortlist due to the amazing achievements of our nominees.

DISCOVER OUR SHORTLIST

The public vote of support will open on 04 October for our 200 individual shortlist nominees. Votes can be cast here*.

*Please note there is no public vote for Champions, Companies, Global Award for Achievement or Networks.

Craig Bright, Barclays“At Barclays, we’re focused on improving gender diversity through a workplace environment and culture that enables our female colleagues to fulfil their career aspirations. For me, as a leader in technology, this means really investing in how we attract, retain and develop our female tech talent. Recognising and celebrating female technologists is fundamental towards closing the gender gap and building a diverse, equitable and inclusive culture across the industry. Barclays has been working with WeAreTechWomen since 2015 because they do a fantastic job of shining a spotlight on female role models in technology, and those who support and empower them to realise their full potential. We want to help promote, support and amplify those voices leading positive change and inspiring others, which is why we’re proud to be the headline sponsor for the 2022 TechWomen100 awards.”

CRAIG BRIGHT, GROUP CHIEF INFORMATION OFFICER, BARCLAYS

“At WeAreTechWomen, we have made it our personal mission to shine a spotlight on women working in tech. Our strategic aim is to highlight 1,000 female future leaders in technology by 2025.”

“The response to this year’s awards has been fantastic and the calibre of entries has been outstanding. I am so proud to see so many women in tech recognised for their achievements and really look forward to seeing who our final winners will be on 10 October.”

VANESSA VALLELY OBE, MANAGING DIRECTOR, WEARETECHWOMEN

The 2022 awards are kindly powered by Barclays and sponsored by Accenture, BAE Systems, Bank of America, BT, Clifford Chance, Credit SuisseFunding CircleGoldman SachsHuawei, Morgan Stanley, Northern TrustOliver Wyman, PwC and Sky.

We would like to personally thank our judges who all gave up their valuable time to assemble our shortlist and to help WeAreTechWomen recognise the fantastic achievements of all of our amazing nominees.

Congratulations to all of our shortlisted nominees and best of luck in the next round of judging.

The final list will be announced 10 October. Finalists will be invited to attend a virtual award’s ceremony on 06 December.

POWERED BY

Barclays logo - NEW 2022

SPONSORED BY

TechWomen100 Sponsors 2022

Looking to 'Level Up' your career? Join us on 06 December for career conversations, awesome industry speakers, networking opportunities & more

Looking to ‘level up’ your career? Join us at our Level Up Summit on 06 December for career conversations, awesome industry speakers, networking opportunities and much more!

Over the past seven years, WeAreTechWomen’s Women in Tech conference and summit events have helped over 11,000 female technologists upskill and grow their networks.

We are now delighted to introduce our latest offering – the “Level Up” Women in Tech summit bringing together best practices for career progression. The summit will take place at the QEII Centre in Westminster, London on 06 December 2022 for over 400 in-person attendees, as well as through our live stream for thousands of participants.

WeAreTechWomen Barriers to Tech surveyWhy Level Up?

Just 17 per cent of tech workers in the UK are female, with even fewer in senior leadership – and our recent research with Tech Talent Charter and Ipsos Mori showed that one in five women are thinking of leaving the tech industry! We need to think fast and act innovatively if we are to keep women engaged in the industry and to accelerate their rise to the top.  At WeAreTechWomen, we want to ensure that Women in Tech and the UK tech industry are successful today, tomorrow, and long into the future.

About Level Up

The “Level Up” summit will bring together awesome industry speakers, panels, and personal stories to provoke your thinking, answer your questions and share sustainable solutions to help change representation outcomes in the tech industry. Time will be built into every session for lively facilitated table discussions so you and your colleagues can build executable ideas to progress back at the office from what you’ve learned at the summit.

SPONSORED BY

 
 

Who should attend?


Our Level Up Summit has been designed around and created for:

  • Mid-level Women in Tech e.g. 7 years+ experience, expecting to move into decision-making roles or seeking their next promotion
  • Male allies
  • HR/Tech business partners driving change
  • Senior tech leaders
  • Equity, Diversity and Inclusion leaders
  • ERG leaders supporting Women in Tech
  • Individuals representing smaller companies who want to drive change for women in tech
  • Individuals who are keen to progress themselves, network and gain industry connections

Why attend?


In-person attendees will have access to an entire exhibition floor where you can:

  • meet our sponsor organisations and learn about their career opportunities in tech
  • connect with other attendees to share ideas and practice your networking skills
  • benefit from access to mentors
  • speak with our on-site career coaches about achieving your ambitions and addressing any concerns
  • have professional headshots for your social media channels

Meet the incredible Dr Anne-Marie Imafidon MBE

She’s In CTRL - Anne Marie ImafidonDr Anne-Marie Imafidon MBE shares stories from her book “She’s in CTRL”, including how she founded the amazing tech organisation Stemettes, why she believes women need to take back tech, the importance of role models and her top tips for for a successful technology career.

 

FIND OUT MORE
Anne-Marie Imafidon circle

Plus hear from some inspiring leaders in tech...

What else is going on at Level Up?

LinkedIn Clinic

Need help with your LinkedIn profile or social media presence? You can visit our social experts for top tips and advice.

Headshots

Need a new headshot? You can book to have your new headshot taken by our team of photographers. Limited spaces, booking required.

Coaches

We will have a number of career coaches on site throughout the day. If you need help with your career choices, you can check in with one of our experts.

Creche

Worried about the kids? The summit has an on-site creche to support participating parents (limited spaces apply)! These areas will be open throughout the day.

Exhibition Village

Visit our sponsors to find out about career opportunities and to learn how they are supporting women in tech within their organisations.

CV Clinic

CV Clinic

Need help revamping your CV? You can visit our experts for top tips and practical advice.


Business Woman in tech. Stronger together, Happy women or girls standing together , girls, power, strong, strength, feminism Feminine, woman empowerment, vector illustration.

Why counter-stereotypical female role models are so important

Business Woman in tech. Stronger together, Happy women or girls standing together , girls, power, strong, strength, feminism Feminine, woman empowerment, vector illustration.Article by Alexandra Niessen-Ruenzi, Professor of Finance and Corporate Governance at the University of Mannheim, Business School

Over the last three decades, the lessening gap between the numbers of men and women in higher education and full-time employment has been its own kind of “grand convergence”.

Nevertheless, for now, gender pay parity remains a thing of the future, in part because women are still underrepresented in lucrative professions such as STEM, business, and finance.

Perhaps one reason for this has to do with women’s personal preferences. However, research on this topic has also suggested it could be caused by biases against women and a lack of female role models in these industries whose presence would encourage women to strive for positions in male-dominated industries.

It is noteworthy that the gender pay gap is significantly lower in US states where counter-stereotypical female role models are more popular. This suggests that women who achieve success in occupations that are traditionally perceived as the territory of men inspire other women to do likewise, which mitigates the effects of stereotypes arising from gender norms on women’s career choices.

Admiration for counter-stereotypical female role models is associated with women making decisions that improve their earning potential. For instance, entering high-earning occupations such as STEM, taking on senior-ranked positions, seeking higher education qualifications, and waiting until later in life to start having children.

To define a counter-stereotypical female role model, I, alongside fellow researchers Mengqiao Du from Mannheim Business School and Vidhi Chhaochharia from the University of Miami, analysed qualitative information from 46 cross-sectional Gallup surveys conducted from 1951-2014.

Respondents to these surveys identified a total of 247 famous women whom they said they admired. We sorted these role models into 14 categories depending on their primary occupation.

We compared these career categories to labour market information taken from the Current Population Survey and responses to questions about gender differences in the General Social Survey recorded over a period of around 50 years. This enabled us to get a clear understanding of gender norms at the state level, and helped us sort the 14 categories into stereotypical or counter-stereotypical career paths for a woman.

Level Up Summit 2022

Don’t miss our Level Up Summit on 06 December, where we’re tackling the barriers for women in tech head on. Join us for keynotes, panels, Q&A’s & breakout sessions on finance, people management, negotiation, influencing skills, confidence building, building internal networks, maximising the power of mentorship, and much more. 

BUY YOUR TICKETS

We classify counter-stereotypical female role models as women who are deemed admirable for their work as politicians, writers or journalists, businesswomen, astronauts, scientists, athletes, or activists. In contrast, stereotypical female role models are looked up to as famous wives, mothers, daughters, friends or other family members, nurses, religious persons, or entertainment figures.

The number of respondents who identified counter-stereotypical famous women as admirable has changed strongly over time. From 1950-2014, the percentage of people who look up to stereotypical female role models dropped from 80 percent to around 30 percent; meanwhile, the percentage of people who admired counter-stereotypical female role models rose from below 20 percent to 50 percent.

The real turning point seems to have been in the 1980s, as this was when counter-stereotypical women started to become more popular as role models than women who held more conventional positions.

Naturally, both gender norms and counter-stereotypical female role models play a part in women’s choices, but are such role models more likely to stem from states that already have relatively liberal gender norms? This does not appear to be the case, as we find that 46.5 percent of the counter-stereotypical female role models we identified from the Gallup surveys come from states with liberal gender norms, whereas 53.5 percent originate from states with overall more conservative views.

This suggests that counter-stereotypical role models are not just reflections of a state that is already far more liberally-minded. Furthermore, over time, observing women in atypical professions and positions alters people’s perceptions about which roles in society are supposed to be filled by a particular gender.

For this reason, counter-stereotypical female role models are a sort of square one for changing gender norms at the state level. If admiration for them increases significantly, the associated effects should propel women’s earnings closer to gender parity with men. This means that at some point, female role models that were once counter-stereotypical will cease to be so. They will instead reflect the new normal.

About the author

Alexandra Niessen-RuenziProf. Dr. Alexandra Niessen-Ruenzi holds the Chair of Corporate Governance at the University of Mannheim, Business School. Her research interests lie in the field of empirical financial market research with a special focus on gender differences in capital markets. Alexandra Niessen-Ruenzi’s research results have been published in top international journals and have been awarded several prizes such as the Rothschild Cesarea IDC Award and the SABE Award from the New York Stock Exchange. Her publications have also been well received by the media and have been discussed in the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal, among others. She is a sought-after speaker on gender topics and regularly presents her research findings at both academic conferences as well as in industry companies and associations.


Inspirational Woman: Zeinab Ardeshir | Co-founder & CEO of PillSorted

Zeinab ArdeshirZeinab Ardeshir co-founded PillSorted, a personalised pharmacy service, nearly three years ago with the aim of disrupting the traditionally transactional pharma experience and instead delivering a compassionate, more relationship-focused experience.

The healthtech – which works with a number of NHS services to deliver medications – uses technology to get medication dispensed and delivered to patients in a timely manner, which in turn means that pharmacists are able to optimise their time consulting patients.

Zeinab holds a Doctor of Pharmacy from Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences and a Postgraduate diploma for Overseas Pharmacists from Aston University and prior to Co-founding Pill Sorted, spent nearly 11 years working as a pharmacist at Boots and Tesco.

Tell us a bit about yourself, your background, your current role

I’m Zeinab Ardeshir, the Co-founder, CEO and Chief Pharmacist of PillSorted. I’m a qualified pharmacist and worked as a community pharmacist for 17 years before starting PillSorted, in various countries.

I’ve always particularly loved community pharmacy, because it’s such a rare blend of science and human relationships.

I set up PillSorted in November 2019, right before the pandemic hit, to deliver a pharmacy experience that combined compassionate care and technology. PillSorted is a product of my love for community pharmacy and my desire to ensure pharmacists are providing the best care possible. Pharmacists are often seen as glorified retail assistants, however I believe their potential is untapped and they could be delivering more holistic care. We provide a completely personalised pharmacy service for people who are on multiple medications, delivering their medication and dosage information to them each month and reviewing their medications constantly. Many of our patients are elderly people who have different medical prescriptions, so our service is designed to provide ongoing support and make managing their prescriptions easier for them.

There are many manual and repetitive tasks in community pharmacy, which is where companies like PillSorted can help. In the same way that we can get groceries delivered on-demand, I  wanted to create a company that could provide something similar for antibiotics. I want PillSorted to play a role in providing preventative healthcare for the community, which is so important given the NHS staff shortages we’re currently seeing.

As the CEO, my focus is on customer care and the clinical side of the business, where my Pharmacist background helps. My co-founder Mohammad ensures that the operations run smoothly and together we make sure all teams work in unison.

Did you ever sit down and plan your career?

I made a very conscious decision to move from being a pharmacist to an entrepreneur pharmacist, as I’ve always prioritised taking care of patients – it’s been my north star in all my career decisions.

Moving from a clinical focused background to being a Founder of a healthtech has definitely been a big change and a learning curve! I enjoy the multifaceted aspect of leadership, from marketing, finance, people management and moving the business forward and towards a common goal.

Have you faced any career challenges along the way and how did you overcome these?

Starting a company was one of the pivotal changes in my career and definitely hasn’t come without its challenges. I started from thinking I wasn’t good enough, to realising that there are many questions that no one knows the answer to, and that it’s okay not to know everything.

I’d like to think I’ve embraced all the challenges as learning opportunities and am always asking questions.

And, having a great mentor helps too.

What has been your biggest career achievement to date?

Growing PillSorted from zero to where it is now is my biggest achievement to date, but it’s just the beginning. It has given me the chance to take care of patients more than any other time in my career and has been truly rewarding. I feel very lucky to have an amazing team of people in all aspects of the company.

What one thing do you believe has been a major factor in your success?

The obsession with delivering the best care possible has always been at the heart of my career. I’m also brutally honest with people around me and more importantly, with myself. Being true to oneself is absolutely key in making consistent decisions. I also have an incredible support network, particularly my children, who motivate me and are in my corner.

What top tips would you give to an individual who is trying to excel their career in technology?

Go ahead, be brave and ask questions! We have an amazing female software developer who is incredibly detailed in her work and has a positive attitude. She has been brave to join a sector that is completely new to her. She has been the only developer in our organisation for a while, has asked lots of questions along the way and has pioneered the creation of our operating system as a result. There will always be people in your corner.

Do you believe there are still barriers for success for women working in tech, if so, how can these barriers be overcome?

I think like many male dominated industries, it is challenging to find the right career advice at the right time. Becoming a founder, venturing into business, or asking for investment can all feel like daunting tasks just as being the only female tech developer in a team can be daunting. We need to think of ourselves as pioneers and feel confident that mistakes are learning opportunities and nothing more. Barriers become much easier to overcome when they don’t stem from a fear of failure.

What do you think companies can do to support the progress of the careers of women working in technology?

Creating a culture of nurture and mentorship enables women to flourish.

Companies need to provide training, to create career progression pathways, to proactively offer them to women and to encourage women to keep these decisions in their forecast.

Our employees trust their time and careers with us and we need to enable their career progression and the feeling of success being part of a winning team.

There are currently only 21 percent of women working in tech, if you could wave a magic wand, what is the one thing you would do to accelerate the pace of change for women in the industry

It starts in school. Educating girls to flourish in STEM topics and showing the excitement and impact that science brings to people’s lives is important. Women are naturally nurturing characters, so showing the impact that the STEM sector can have is especially important.

During their careers, encouraging women to consider choices that include learning and stepping up to the opportunities, are of utmost importance, as they would never know if they enjoy a new profession/ skill until they try.

For women who have been fortunate enough to succeed in their careers, holding the hands of the younger generation, helping them envision different perspectives so they make informed choices, is the most important contribution.

What resources do you recommend for women working in tech, eg Podcasts, networking events, books, conferences, websites etc?

I have used Coursera for my learnings and would recommend using any of the notable online courses. It is a true blessing to have this wealth of knowledge at your fingertips and being able to learn at your own convenience. I’ve learned a lot from YC Startup School and also following thought leaders in the industry. I prefer a mix of learning methods such as podcasts, well written subjects, and short videos. There’s a plethora of knowledge and I’d advise making it a priority to block time out of the day to learn and think.


TechWomen100 2022 Banners (800 × 600 px) (1)

One week to go until nominations close | TechWomen100 Awards 2022

TechWomen100 2022 Banners

Just one week to go until nominations close for the TechWomen100 Awards 2022!

Our awards focus solely on women working in tech below director level. We hope that by highlighting the accolades of up-and-coming inspirational female tech talent, we can help to create a new generation of female role models for the industry, and a pipeline of future leaders.

The awards also feature a “Global Award for Achievement” category, to help expand our search for global talent. This category is a female individual who works within the tech industry outside of the UK, whose current position is below director level.

Through the awards, we would also like to recognise a number of senior individuals who are championing up-and-coming women, as well as any organisations that have designed and implemented successful initiatives and programmes in order to attract, retain and develop the female tech talent.

Finally, we applaud the often-voluntary efforts of the women in tech networks that operate across the UK, and again would like to formerly recognise these within our awards.

Nominations close at 23:59 (BST) on 12 August 2022. Don’t miss your chance to nominate amazing women, Champions, Networks and Companies!

CAST YOUR NOMINATIONS

What happened next for our TechWomen100 alumni?


Hear from our TechWomen100 alumni about what they’ve achieved since winning the award, how it’s helped them progress and why you should nominate an amazing woman

Tribeni Chougule | Head of Change Management, Visa Finance (Europe)

Shruti Ajitsaria | Partner and head of Fuse at AllenOvery

The TechWomen100 awards are the first of their kind to focus solely on the female tech talent pipeline and recognise the impact of champions, companies and networks that are leading the way.

The 2022 awards are kindly powered by Barclays and sponsored by Accenture, BAE Systems, Bank of America, BT, Clifford Chance, Credit SuisseFunding CircleGoldman SachsHuawei, Morgan Stanley, Northern TrustOliver Wyman, PwC and Sky.

The process

Nominations open online on 01 July via WeAreTechWomen. Nominations will close after a six-week period on 12 August.

A shortlist of 200 women from a range of technology disciplines will be chosen in October by an esteemed panel of judges. There will also be a shortlist of three Champions, Global Award of Achievement, Companies and Networks.

The shortlist will then be published and we will also open the TechWomen100 individual category for public votes of support.

Winners will be announced in October and celebrated at award’s ceremony on 06 December. There will be 100 winners of the TechWomen100, a Champion of the Year, a Global Award of Achievement, a Company of the Year and a Network of the Year.

Who should nominate?

  • Self-nominations are encouraged
  • Organisations looking to recognise their emerging talent pool
  • Organisation wishing to obtain recognition for their initiatives
  • Individuals who would like to recognise their efforts of their champions/role models
  • Individuals/colleagues/friends/clients/mentors/sponsors of the nominee

Award’s timeline

Nominations open
01 July 2022

Nominations close
12 August 2022

Shortlist announced
03 October 2022

Public vote opens
04 October 2022

Voting closes
07 October 2022

Winners announced
10 October 2022

Winner’s celebration event
06 December 2022

POWERED BY

Barclays logo - NEW 2022

SPONSORED BY

TechWomen100 Sponsors 2022

TechWomen100 2022 Banners (800 × 600 px) (1)

WeAreTechWomen are proud to announce Barclays as headline sponsor for our 2022 TechWomen100 Awards

TechWomen100 2022 Banners

WeAreTechWomen is excited to announce Barclays as our headline sponsor for the 2022 TechWomen100 Awards!

Now in their sixth year, the TechWomen100 awards are once again looking to recognise and celebrate the achievements of women working in technology.

Our strategic objective is to use the awards to highlight 1,000 future female tech leaders by 2030. To date, we have celebrated the success of over 475 incredible women, alongside outstanding tech networks, senior champions who are driving change and companies who are doing their upmost to support the careers of their female technologists.

In previous years, the awards have been supported by an array of FTSE sponsors and this year is no different.

We are extremely proud to announce that the 2022 TechWomen100 Awards are powered by Barclays. We would like to extend our sincere thanks to Barclays for their support for this year’s awards, their words of encouragement and for helping us to celebrate the achievements of amazing women.

The 2022 awards are kindly sponsored by Accenture, BAE Systems, Bank of America, BT, Clifford Chance, Credit SuisseFunding CircleGoldman SachsHuawei, Morgan Stanley, Northern TrustOliver Wyman, PwC and Sky.

A word from our headline sponsor

“At Barclays, we’re focused on improving gender diversity through a workplace environment and culture that enables our female colleagues to fulfil their career aspirations. For me, as a leader in technology, this means really investing in how we attract, retain and develop our female tech talent. Recognising and celebrating female technologists is fundamental towards closing the gender gap and building a diverse, equitable and inclusive culture across the industry. Barclays has been working withWeAreTechWomen since 2015 because they do a fantastic job of shining a spotlight on female role models in technology, and those who support and empower them to realise their full potential. We want to help promote, support and amplify those voices leading positive change and inspiring others, which is why we’re proud to be the headline sponsor for the 2022 TechWomen100 Awards”

 Craig Bright, Group Chief Information Officer, Barclays

Craig Bright, Barclays
Barclays logo - NEW 2022
READ WHY OUR SPONSORS ARE SUPPORTING THE AWARDS

Nominations for our TechWomen100 Awards are open until 12 August 2022!

The TechWomen100 awards focus solely on women working in tech below director level.

We hope that by highlighting the accolades of up-and-coming inspirational female tech talent, we can help to create a new generation of female role models for the industry, and a pipeline of future leaders.

The awards also feature a “Global Award for Achievement” category, to help expand our search for global talent. This category is a female individual who works within the tech industry outside of the UK, whose current position is below director level.

Through the awards, we would also like to recognise a number of senior individuals who are championing up-and-coming women, as well as any organisations that have designed and implemented successful initiatives and programmes in order to attract, retain and develop the female tech talent.

Finally, we applaud the often-voluntary efforts of the women in tech networks that operate across the UK, and again would like to formerly recognise these within our awards.

The TechWomen100 awards are the first of their kind to focus solely on the female tech talent pipeline and recognise the impact of champions, companies and networks that are leading the way.


TechWomen100 2022 Banners (800 × 600 px) (1)

Two weeks to go until nominations close | TechWomen100 Awards 2022

TechWomen100 2022 Banners

Just two weeks to go until nominations close for the TechWomen100 Awards 2022!

Our awards focus solely on women working in tech below director level. We hope that by highlighting the accolades of up-and-coming inspirational female tech talent, we can help to create a new generation of female role models for the industry, and a pipeline of future leaders.

The awards also feature a “Global Award for Achievement” category, to help expand our search for global talent. This category is a female individual who works within the tech industry outside of the UK, whose current position is below director level.

Through the awards, we would also like to recognise a number of senior individuals who are championing up-and-coming women, as well as any organisations that have designed and implemented successful initiatives and programmes in order to attract, retain and develop the female tech talent.

Finally, we applaud the often-voluntary efforts of the women in tech networks that operate across the UK, and again would like to formerly recognise these within our awards.

Nominations close at 23:59 (BST) on 12 August 2022. Don’t miss your chance to nominate amazing women, Champions, Networks and Companies!

CAST YOUR NOMINATIONS

What happened next for our TechWomen100 alumni?


Hear from our TechWomen100 alumni about what they’ve achieved since winning the award, how it’s helped them progress and why you should nominate an amazing woman

Shruti Ajitsaria | Partner and head of Fuse at AllenOvery

Sonal Shah | Vice President in Projects, Barclays

The TechWomen100 awards are the first of their kind to focus solely on the female tech talent pipeline and recognise the impact of champions, companies and networks that are leading the way.

The 2022 awards are kindly powered by Barclays and sponsored by Accenture, BAE Systems, Bank of America, BT, Clifford Chance, Credit SuisseFunding CircleGoldman SachsHuawei, Morgan Stanley, Northern TrustOliver Wyman, PwC and Sky.

The Process

Nominations open online on 01 July via WeAreTechWomen. Nominations will close after a six-week period on 12 August.

A shortlist of 200 women from a range of technology disciplines will be chosen in October by an esteemed panel of judges. There will also be a shortlist of three Champions, Global Award of Achievement, Companies and Networks.

The shortlist will then be published and we will also open the TechWomen100 individual category for public votes of support.

Winners will be announced in October and celebrated at award’s ceremony on 06 December. There will be 100 winners of the TechWomen100, a Champion of the Year, a Global Award of Achievement, a Company of the Year and a Network of the Year.

Who should nominate?

  • Self-nominations are encouraged
  • Organisations looking to recognise their emerging talent pool
  • Organisation wishing to obtain recognition for their initiatives
  • Individuals who would like to recognise their efforts of their champions/role models
  • Individuals/colleagues/friends/clients/mentors/sponsors of the nominee

Award’s timeline

Nominations open
01 July 2022

Nominations close
12 August 2022

Shortlist announced
03 October 2022

Public vote opens
04 October 2022

Voting closes
07 October 2022

Winners announced
10 October 2022

Winner’s celebration event
06 December 2022

POWERED BY

Barclays logo - NEW 2022

SPONSORED BY

TechWomen100 Sponsors 2022

black woman working on computer in the hallway, diversity, SysAdmin Day

SysAdmins: The backbone of our organisations

SysAdmin Day has arrived, giving us a chance to show appreciation for our system administrators.

black woman working on computer in the hallway, diversity, SysAdmin Dayblack woman working on computer in the hallway, diversity, SysAdmin Day

They are the ones who undertake the work on the front line of the IT world, handling everything from system failures to updating hardware and a variety of other tasks in between. Unfortunately, because much of the work they do takes place behind the scenes, they are often under-appreciated despite being so integral to day-to-day runnings. We spoke to ten technology experts to give us a better insight into the vital work SysAdmins carry out and how we can appreciate them going forward.

The lack of acknowledgement of SysAdmins seems to stem from a lack of understanding their work.

Mike Gosling, IT Service Platforms Manager at Cubic Transportation Systems expands, “whilst SysAdmins are respected within the IT profession, many people do not understand the scope and complexity of their role. High quality IT services are often taken for granted, with the phrase ‘out of sight, out of mind’ proving indicative. Indeed, organisations have a tendency to recognise customer facing staff more than roles like the SysAdmin, which keep systems running behind the scenes”.

In order to rectify this under-appreciation, it is first important to realise what the role of a SysAdmin involves. Paul Farrington, Chief Product Officer at Glasswall explains: “SysAdmins are vital employees – from ensuring that system patches are rolled out on time, to monitoring the performance of all IT systems to ensure they’re working effectively, SysAdmins keep their organisations delivering services to customers”.

Advanced skillsets demanded of SysAdmins

The position also requires a great deal of multitasking as Terry Storrar, Managing Director, Leaseweb UK highlights. “SysAdmins not only have to contend with day-to-day tasks, they also have to be crisis managers in the event of a natural disaster or cyber attack. In addition to this, they also have to keep up with the latest IT trends, home working and introduction of BYOD – no mean feat by anyone’s standards. When it comes to multitasking and wearing many hats, SysAdmins reign supreme”.

David Miller, SVP Technology, at Fluent Commerce also touches on the many roles SysAdmins cover: “they have evolved into DevOps, cloud, and site reliability engineers (SREs) in the age of the cloud. These individuals are the backbone of organisations by ensuring shipping software is cost-effective, reliable, secure and performant. By converting committed code into value that is delivered to clients, they empower users to have all they need to accomplish their jobs securely.”

He adds “they are the foundation for ensuring that performance and availability are increasing globally. On SysAdmin Day, we are proud to honour their dedication and hard work.”

With technology advancing, this only means the requirements expected of SysAdmins are increasing. Richard Orange, Vice President EMEA at Exabeam furthers, “their job is getting harder every year. Challenges now facing SysAdmins include supporting a geographically diverse workforce, while contending with an ever-expanding attack surface and diminishing distinguishable corporate perimeter.

“And, as organisations become increasingly cloud-focused, SysAdmins are doing a huge amount of the heavy lifting when it comes to migration. Accelerated cloud adoption is also removing some of the previous security controls inherent in provisioning on-premise infrastructure, causing further complexities for our SysAdmins”.

Working from home impact

The pandemic thrust everyone into the unknown territory of working from home, meaning different things for different professions and industries, and SysAdmins were no exception. Steve Young, UKI Sales Engineering Director at Commvault, explains, “as working from home has doubled in the UK in the past two years, more employees are remotely accessing company networks than ever before. At the same time, the threat landscape has grown dramatically, with 39% of UK businesses suffering a cyberattack in 2021. Not only are there now more potential entry points for bad actors to access systems, but files are increasingly being stored locally, creating a greater risk of data loss as a result of shadow IT and files not being backed up. For this reason, the job of a SysAdmin has never been more necessary”.

Despite these added challenges, SysAdmins continue to persevere. Rob Gilbert, Managing Director for Commercial and Logistics Business at Totalmobile discusses how this is evident within the transport sector. “Despite this increase in workload and simultaneous decrease in team members, SysAdmins have worked around the clock during the past few years and helped to successfully keep the country moving – literally. It’s important therefore to take the time to appreciate them for keeping drivers on the road. Just one of the ways businesses can do this is through training and development: creating a clear path for career progression through regular training sessions and opportunities to take on greater responsibilities, supported by fit-for-purpose and innovative technologies that enable them to deliver maximum value”.

Valuing your SysAdmins

No one can argue that the role of SysAdmins is easy, by any means, therefore we must remember to value them and the work they do. Gregg Mearing, CTO at Node4 notes, “SysAdmins quietly bear the full-force of any and all IT business challenges thrown their way. And while they bear the huge responsibility of making sure every piece of equipment and technology runs correctly and efficiently, a SysAdmin’s job is often overlooked. We should appreciate these crucial workers everyday – if you rarely notice the work of a SysAdmin, it proves how good of a job they do! Take time this SysAdmin Day to celebrate the unsung heroes of your business”.

There is a role we can all play in appreciating SysAdmins. Steve Cochran, CTO, ConnectWise advises, “the best thing an organisation can do to support its SysAdmins is to find the right programs to provide insight into workflows and efficiency while facilitating system response monitoring. This frees up SysAdmin to address other, more pressing issues so they are able to be more proactive and handle reactive situations with ease”.

Hugh ScantleburyHugh Scantlebury, CEO and Founder of Aqilla concludes, “they play a central role in maintaining applications, coordinating cloud services and environments, managing data storage and business continuity strategies, and supporting the broader IT infrastructure. They’re the people who keep our networks up and running, rain or shine. We simply would not be able to work without them”.


Portrait of Smart Little Schoolgirl Looking Under the Microscope. In Elementary School Classroom Cute Girl Uses Microscope. STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) Education Program

How to nurture the next generation of women in STEM

Portrait of Smart Little Schoolgirl Looking Under the Microscope. In Elementary School Classroom Cute Girl Uses Microscope.jpg

Article by Ana Sousa Dias, Manager Product Stewardship and Regulatory Affairs, Avantium

The outcomes and results of businesses are a culmination of many things – but arguably, there is no contribution larger than the work of our team members.

Team structures make up the essence of our companies, meaning that it is essential that our leaders foster an inclusive workforce that works for everyone. A work environment should be collaborative between everybody and look to uplift its current employees and potential ones, so that everyone feels motivated to achieve their potential.

By encouraging diversity, we are encouraging the varied and rich perspectives needed to drive innovation. For women in STEM, this is vital and will inform the next generation of people entering jobs in the industry. Already, we are seeing women championing a new wave of innovation, and with solid collaboration, we can continue to do so.

Creating the foundations

As Marie Curie said, “I was taught that the way of progress was neither swift nor easy.” I believe that this applies to both leaders and budding young women wanting to start a career in STEM. Progress and success are built from the ground-up for most people, and the foundations in which one grows has to be carefully laid to ensure its sturdiness.

My background is in chemistry, more specifically I graduated in organic chemistry in the Universidade Nova de Lisboa.  I have been working on sustainable solutions since the beginning of the 2000s. During this time, I have gone from developing technologies to exploring environmental impact of those technologies and the safety of the products within the regulatory landscape. There have been many opportunities to test the waters of the different facets of chemistry which are also open for others to experiment with. And the great thing about innovation is that new possibilities are multiplying – STEM is an area of true variety and growth. It is vital that these opportunities are taken, to build up one’s experience and find a focus that inspires.

It is also important that leaders continue to offer opportunities and ways into the industry for younger women, whether this be through work experience for high school students or internships for those studying STEM subjects at degree level. Whilst education is a key component to harnessing the knowledge needed to work in the industry, in-person, hands-on experience is incomparable and exposes people to the skills needed to succeed. A mixture of the two, education and work experience, bring a rich and strong foundation for future generations of women to excel in STEM. In other words, this is a collaborative effort between leaders in the field and the budding scientists themselves.

Establishing the best possible environment

Taking my findings in sugar chemistry during my PhD in CICECO, Universidade de Aveiro, I joined forces with the equally passionate company in The Netherlands: Avantium, one of the very few scientific groups active in the sugar conversion field. This was a huge turning point for me, being the first opportunity to analyse data and explore more technologies and catalytical systems, benefiting from high throughput screening knowledge and capabilities of Avantium. Having solidified a passion for sustainable chemistry beforehand, it was ideal that I had found a match in a company which could help me excel both as an individual and in a team.

With a positive, motivational work environment, it becomes easy to grow and deliver. This is where companies must take initiative and continuously strive towards the best possible workplace, even those who are already succeeding in this. As workplaces are pushed to be more inclusive, businesses must remember that their team consists of individuals with diverse needs and lifestyles. In STEM, we must look to cater to every person and circumstance, wanting the best for employees so that we ensure good mental wellbeing and the best outcomes as a business.

Current leaders of STEM can reflect on our collective experiences, good and bad, to advise how we continue to harness inclusivity in all we do. My person experiences are hopefully a motivator to nurture women in STEM careers and continuously support changes that lead to equal opportunities.

And we must continue to keep mindful of the varying experiences of women who have unfortunately been underestimated and not offered the chances to excel in STEM. As someone who is thankful to be part of a team that wanted to help kick start my career in the industry, we must take these as examples of how we can ensure all women around the world are able to do the same.

We must collectively continue to do the same by offering opportunities to generations of underrepresented communities of all ages to be a part of the future of sustainable innovation. Technology and science move at an accelerated rate and with that, the way we approach developing next-generation technologies must be reflected in our approach to nurturing future scientists.

Representation matters

As demonstrated in many disheartening figures regarding workplace behaviour towards women, there are instances where discrimination is being made, based on gender, as well as race, sexuality and age. These behaviours are leading to some women feeling unsafe and undervalued, and risks preventing others from stepping forward and progressing in their careers. In telling experiences of women in STEM who have had positive, rewarding professional experiences, we can promote best practice for inclusive environments and ways to champion diversity. We must continue to represent the wealth of enrichment that can be gained in this field of work.

Visibility and representation are some of the key ways businesses can create a future workplace where women flourish and feel safe; young girls can envision themselves working in a STEM leadership position if they have the correct example of the ambition needed and path to follow to reach their goal. And whilst quota principles mean well, we must firstly lead by example through our efficiencies and performance, rather than by numbers.

Fundamentally, Diversity in leadership roles helps marginalised communities across the board, through visibility and showing that this achievement is possible. It also inspires others to follow, or through education and implementing practices that foster opportunities that encourage other women to enter the workplace.

From the perspective of providing sustainable alternatives, we are working for the future and need the most forward-thinking people to help do that. As a mother, I know that our work developing sustainable solutions will impact my child and her generation the most. But I also work to give her the example and confidence to be daring and outspoken qualities that are often pinned against women as ‘undesirable’.

Many women underestimate their own abilities and dilute their bold personalities to fit the mould constructed for them. It is our job as leaders to help them realise their full potential. My advice for budding women entering STEM – be eager, ambitious and enjoy each moment.

Keeping the momentum up

Whilst I feel I have been successful in my career as a woman in leadership and STEM, producing innovative, sustainable technologies, it does not stop there. My work in regulatory compliance and science has shown that in our everchanging world, discoveries happen every day. There is no single end goal, and the goalposts are always moving. This pace of change keeps me motivated to continue to climb to the next level and help lead the next generation to create more diversity into the industry.


S04E14 Day in the life of a software engineer SST

Listen to our latest She Talks Tech podcast on 'A Day in the Life of a Software Engineer' with DWP Digital

S04E14 Day in the life of a software engineer SST

A career in software engineering can open a lot of exciting doors for anyone, with it being one of the fastest-growing areas in the digital sector. 

Today on She Talks Tech, DWP Digital software engineers Chloe, Shivangi and Beth will share their journeys into tech. They discuss what a day-in-the-life of a software engineer looks like, as well as the different career paths into this field. They’ll also cover the difference between front-end and back-end, popular programming languages, and the use of API’s. Not to mention top tips to kick start your career in software engineering.

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Vanessa Valleley OBE, founder of WeAreTheCity and WeAreTechWomen brings you this latest resource to help you rise to the top of the tech industry. Women in tech make up just 21 per cent of the industry in the UK and we want to inspire that to change.

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