Woman in tech, working on laptop, female entrepreneur

By Dash Tabor, co-founder of Tubr.

The first thing I would say to anyone thinking about working in tech, is that you don’t necessarily have to have a background in tech to make that step. I left university with degrees in Mass Communication and PR and City Planning and Development.

My first major role was as a project organiser in a tech-company, before I worked my way into the development divisions. There were periods when I was the only woman within management in my division. And I sat in countless meetings where I was also the only woman in the room.

Although at times it was difficult, I saw it as an opportunity to learn and embraced the chance I had.

January is a time where we are assessing where our lives are at, and where our careers are going. For many that can lead to applying for a new job, and going through the process of trying to stand out in a recruitment process.

It can be overwhelming to apply for jobs, particularly if you’re just starting out. It’s discouraging to see hundreds of applicants, and wonder how you’re going to stand out.

So in terms of getting into tech I’d offer four key planks of advice. One, make LinkedIn your friend. Find others in the space you’re interested in, and engage with them until you’re comfortable to drop a note and ask for a call. Learn what you need to have on your CV and then ensure you know the right language and key words to make your CV stand out.

Next, if you see a job posting that you’re interested in, go to the recruiter or hiring manager before you apply. Send an elevator pitch (it should be no more than 4-5 sentences) of why you’re interested. You will need to sell yourself, so don’t be afraid to do that but also don’t claim anything you can’t back up in an interview.

Also don’t be afraid to ask to learn more about the role before you apply. This puts you on the radar of an employer, and could get you through the screening process faster.

Third, expect the first few interviews to be a learning experience. I often tried to imagine I interviewing them as much as they were me. Four, count your ‘no’s” and celebrate them. Each no eventually leads you to the right yes

I often hear people in their late 20s saying they are unhappy with their career path, but are scared to change. Just think, you have another 40 years to work before you retire – maybe longer.

Ask yourself, what do you think you can’t accomplish in 40 years? But be sure you don’t quit your job before you have a clear plan that is already in motion.

If you’re stuck in a job you hate, focus on what you can get out of it during the time you’re there. Decide to learn or master a new skill, or perhaps set a goal that you can focus on that helps you get your next steps plan in motion.

There is opportunity everywhere.

The people who win are the people who see the opportunity and then capitalise on it.

Dash TaborAbout the author

Dash Tabor is co-founder and CEO of TUBR, a tech start-up which has developed machine learning technology that needs only a fraction of that data usually required to make real-time predictions across rapidly changing environments. She studied for a Masters at Kingston University in City Planning and Sustainable development and now runs TUBR.